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Old 08-23-2010, 08:27 AM
 
841 posts, read 2,143,643 times
Reputation: 385

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My husband is a victim of identity theft a few times a year. We have identity protection on all of our cards and we even get alerts by email when any transaction goes thru via web or phone for our debit card. We also shred all our paperwork that has sensitive information on it. He was a victim a couple of months ago when someone went on a shopping spree in NY with his debit card...and now just this weekend someone went on another shopping spree in Georgia with his credit card. I've heard of people becoming identity fraud victims, but how is it that 1 specific person can have so many instances?? I can understand 1 time..but this has already happened to him like 3 times within the last year and a half. Everytime I use any of my cards, I am asked for ID. How does identity theft work? Does someone physically come into a store with a fake credit card and ID? Is there anything else we can do to protect ourselves?
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Old 08-23-2010, 11:01 AM
 
551 posts, read 1,194,405 times
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Does your husband do any online purchasing or banking? That is my guess. Your computer may be compromised and his passwords may have been logged by a virus and/or hackers.

You won't need to pay for an antivirus software since there are many good free ones (MSE, Avast, AVG, Avir, etc.) not to mention malware removal tools like Malwarebytes. I suggest you go consult someone who really knows about malware removal and prevention. Also, have your husband change his passwords on a CLEAN computer, preferably someone else's you trust.
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Old 08-23-2010, 12:47 PM
 
841 posts, read 2,143,643 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tban View Post
Does your husband do any online purchasing or banking? That is my guess. Your computer may be compromised and his passwords may have been logged by a virus and/or hackers.

You won't need to pay for an antivirus software since there are many good free ones (MSE, Avast, AVG, Avir, etc.) not to mention malware removal tools like Malwarebytes. I suggest you go consult someone who really knows about malware removal and prevention. Also, have your husband change his passwords on a CLEAN computer, preferably someone else's you trust.
Hmm..he rarely uses a computer and when he does, it's just to browse sites and look up information. He's never purchased anything online and I do all the banking. But that is a great idea...I never thought of that so I will definitely look into that. Maybe I will change all passwords on all of our accounts to be on the safe side. I just hate that we work so hard for our money and these lowlives are going around stealing our hard earned money! I hope something can be done to catch these thieves!
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Old 08-23-2010, 12:53 PM
 
Location: Matthews, NC
14,693 posts, read 23,128,863 times
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1. Did you guys get all new cards when it happened?
2. The breach may be on the bank's side. Are the cards through the same bank?
3. Being asked for an ID when making a credit transaction is the exception, in my opinion. They don't even bother most times whether or not you have a signature or "check ID" written on the back. Since transactions can be so easily disputed stores have opted to save time by not asking the customers for ID. Some places now ask for the last 5 digits on the card, I guess because it is harder for a spoofed card to have the actual correct account number embossed on it.
4. You might find more useful information in the Personal Finance forum: http://www.city-data.com/forum/personal-finance/
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Old 08-23-2010, 01:39 PM
 
841 posts, read 2,143,643 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bs13690 View Post
1. Did you guys get all new cards when it happened?
2. The breach may be on the bank's side. Are the cards through the same bank?
3. Being asked for an ID when making a credit transaction is the exception, in my opinion. They don't even bother most times whether or not you have a signature or "check ID" written on the back. Since transactions can be so easily disputed stores have opted to save time by not asking the customers for ID. Some places now ask for the last 5 digits on the card, I guess because it is harder for a spoofed card to have the actual correct account number embossed on it.
4. You might find more useful information in the Personal Finance forum: http://www.city-data.com/forum/personal-finance/
Yes, they cancelled the cards and issued us new ones with new account numbers and yes, the cards have been through the same bank. Last time it was our debit card, this time a credit card with the same bank. You're right about them [the merchants] not asking for ID the majority of the time. What we did now (which will probably be very inconvenient) is that we blocked the card from any usage outside our town unless we call them first and let them know that we will be using the card in another city/town etc that day. Hopefully this will help.
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Old 08-23-2010, 01:48 PM
 
1,253 posts, read 4,171,245 times
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From what I understand, once someone has your social security number and information they sell this data on the black market. Its very scary, there are probably new people buying his information online every few months.
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Old 08-23-2010, 02:07 PM
 
841 posts, read 2,143,643 times
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Originally Posted by FrankTheTank2 View Post
From what I understand, once someone has your social security number and information they sell this data on the black market. Its very scary, there are probably new people buying his information online every few months.
What's crazy is that he has a VERY easy social security number..it's almost unreal that he would have the number he has...I wish there was a way to change your social security number...
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Old 08-23-2010, 03:18 PM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC
4,761 posts, read 6,437,417 times
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I've been in that situation and its awful. Put a Security Freeze on all of his accounts until things cool down. This should prevent anyone from obaining new credit in his name. I'd even reccomend changing banks since it seems like the common thread here. Dispute everything he didn't charge/buy/etc. Stick with it. I'm still dealing with my ID theft in minor ways 3 years later.

I found the guy who had my info and he told me where it came from. It came from a hospital. His group had a person in the billing department and she would sell your info for $10-20 per setup. Its a real shame that you're worth that little. But its easy money when you have access to thousands of patients' info.

Think about EVERY place that he's been where his personal info would have been used. Think back to several months before the first time and I bet something will stick out.

Best of luck with this nightmare. Just be sure to see it through until the end.
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Old 08-23-2010, 09:15 PM
 
551 posts, read 1,194,405 times
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Place a fraud alert, extended one if you want, on your credit report so that it will be tough for anyone to obtain credit under your name and ssn. This may make it harder for you but only you can prove your identity.

I had a ID theft scare two weeks ago and had change all of my account passwords, closed a few accounts, etc. to prevent any id theft.

I agree, I hate how there are people out there that want to ruin your name and your hard work! I would love to get my hands on them =)
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Old 08-24-2010, 08:51 AM
 
Location: Waxhaw
440 posts, read 1,009,852 times
Reputation: 233
I never get asked for ID. Besides, they can take a card of any sort & with a re-encoding machine just re-encode the card. So they could for example have any stolen card & re-encode it with his info since it sounds like they have it on file. There's also an internet black market out there for stolen card #'s whereby the criminals buy the card & then use it. Kinda like how you can search for an internet coupon that people share/post for free, except it's stolen cards. There's a million ways for criminals to commit crime. I'm curious if you've tried LifeLock?? I've always wondered about them.
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