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Old 04-12-2011, 06:42 PM
 
359 posts, read 505,037 times
Reputation: 280

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rampart2 View Post
That could happen with anyone.. Could be a guy with no criminal history what so ever and being pulled over for a speeding violation...

I see what you're saying, and forgive me if I point to the fact that I've never seen any officer wait for a second officer before turning on his lights, but many times have seen an officer follow someone for a few minutes before turning the lights on. I guess I'll just have to take your word for it...

I am in no way intending this as an insult to you or your profession. I'm just saying, there is a lot of weight put on an officers testimony, and it's awful convenient that many infractions aren't caught on tape. Especially in my case..
A reasonable person would think the following:

1. A person who has a criminal history is much more likely to commit future crimes.
2. Officers call in their stops so that other officers know where they are just in case something crazy happens.
3. Crimes are more important than traffic violations and more resources will be used for prosecuting criminals

Once again, it sounds like you're upset you were given a ticket and feel as though it was wrongfully given to you. Did you or your lawyer request a copy of the traffic stop footage?
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Old 04-12-2011, 06:53 PM
 
103 posts, read 368,618 times
Reputation: 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by NDAlum View Post
A reasonable person would think the following:
1. A person who has a criminal history is much more likely to commit future crimes.
And yet there are first time offenders every day right? People aren't born with a criminal history.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NDAlum View Post
2. Officers call in their stops so that other officers know where they are just in case something crazy happens.
Calling a stop in can happen before, during, or after an officer decides to turn on his lights

Quote:
Originally Posted by NDAlum View Post
3. Crimes are more important than traffic violations and more resources will be used for prosecuting criminals
We agree there..

Quote:
Originally Posted by NDAlum View Post
Once again, it sounds like you're upset you were given a ticket and feel as though it was wrongfully given to you. Did you or your lawyer request a copy of the traffic stop footage?
Once again... sigh... OBVIOUSLY.. If you couldn't tell by that being plainly stated in my previous posts, you could just assume that no one wants to be sitting in court for some crime/infraction they did not commit.. But that doesn't change the fact that there are problems with the system.

Maybe everything is perfect, you should go to internal affairs and tell them their services are not needed. I'm not sure they understand it that way.
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Old 04-12-2011, 07:06 PM
 
Location: Up above the world so high!
45,269 posts, read 88,615,347 times
Reputation: 39870
Quote:
Originally Posted by NDAlum View Post
Yes I am in regards to a felony stop, which is why I run the tag. It's policy and I'm not stopping a person in a stolen car by myself. That is just stupid.

I don't see why an officer immediately has to turn on their lights/siren when they see a violation. I don't think they need to follow you around for two miles and then do it, but about 30 seconds to run a tag is a safety precaution. I don't know who you are. You could have a gun and want to kill yourself but take me out first.

There are too many things that could possibly happen.
Just a hunch, but I'm betting your goal every day is to just do a good job protecting the citizens you serve AND to go home alive and well when your shift ends.

I cannot imagine going to a job where I had to be conscious of the fact that somebody in the course of my day might want to hurt or kill me

With that thought always in the back of your mind it's very understandable to me why you'd always be thinking of your own safety and what things "could possibly happen".

One of my sons is in his mid 20's. He's a great young man, but let's just say, he doesn't look like he's a card carrying member of the Young Republicans Club His car is older and a bit beat up. He's got tats on both arms, a few piercings and usually some kind of heavy metal music blaring out of his car speakers.

When he was much younger we had conversations with him to make him aware that kids who look like him might be looked on somewhat suspiciously by law enforcement if they were ever pulled over. Sure, no one should judge a book by its cover, but it happens.

Especially when a police officer is looking for a specific suspect and he only has a split second to size up the person he's pulled over or risk not making it home that night himself. We taught our son the importance of showing the officer immediate respect and giving full cooperation.

As a teen he bristled about being judged unfairly. We reminded him life is not fair. As he matured into his 20's and actually had a few occasions to be pulled over for various reasons (a tail light not working, a DWI checkpoint, a license checkpoint, etc) he followed our instructions and grew to appreciate them. He tells me every encounter he's had with a CMPD officer over the years has been professional and courteous.

Maybe he's just been lucky.

Or maybe the fact we taught him to respect the badge and the person behind the badge, (a person with a job to do who just wants to do it well and go home safely at the end of his shift) created that environment.

Either way, it's a good day when everyone goes home to their families
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Old 04-12-2011, 07:08 PM
 
359 posts, read 505,037 times
Reputation: 280
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rampart2 View Post
And yet there are first time offenders every day right? People aren't born with a criminal history.



Calling a stop in can happen before, during, or after an officer decides to turn on his lights



We agree there..



Once again... sigh... OBVIOUSLY.. If you couldn't tell by that being plainly stated in my previous posts, you could just assume that no one wants to be sitting in court for some crime/infraction they did not commit.. But that doesn't change the fact that there are problems with the system.

Maybe everything is perfect, you should go to internal affairs and tell them their services are not needed. I'm not sure they understand it that way.
Ok

Have a good night, sir.
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Old 04-12-2011, 08:08 PM
 
103 posts, read 368,618 times
Reputation: 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by lovesMountains View Post
I cannot imagine going to a job where I had to be conscious of the fact that somebody in the course of my day might want to hurt or kill me
I've done my fair share sweetheart, and I don't need to explain it for you or anyone else. I've put my life on the line for what our government tells us was your "freedom".. And have seen probably 100 times more true life threatening situations than your average law enforcement officer that hasn't been in the military. Believe it or not, there are officers that never, ever see an incident of violence directed at them or have ever been in life threatening situations..

It's not all cops and robbers out there. As much as you'd like to dramatize it...

Quote:
Originally Posted by lovesMountains View Post
With that thought always in the back of your mind it's very understandable to me why you'd always be thinking of your own safety and what things "could possibly happen".

One of my sons is in his mid 20's. He's a great young man, but let's just say, he doesn't look like he's a card carrying member of the Young Republicans Club His car is older and a bit beat up. He's got tats on both arms, a few piercings and usually some kind of heavy metal music blaring out of his car speakers.

When he was much younger we had conversations with him to make him aware that kids who look like him might be looked on somewhat suspiciously by law enforcement if they were ever pulled over. Sure, no one should judge a book by its cover, but it happens.

Especially when a police officer is looking for a specific suspect and he only has a split second to size up the person he's pulled over or risk not making it home that night himself. We taught our son the importance of showing the officer immediate respect and giving full cooperation.

As a teen he bristled about being judged unfairly. We reminded him life is not fair. As he matured into his 20's and actually had a few occasions to be pulled over for various reasons (a tail light not working, a DWI checkpoint, a license checkpoint, etc) he followed our instructions and grew to appreciate them. He tells me every encounter he's had with a CMPD officer over the years has been professional and courteous.

Maybe he's just been lucky.

Or maybe the fact we taught him to respect the badge and the person behind the badge, (a person with a job to do who just wants to do it well and go home safely at the end of his shift) created that environment.

Either way, it's a good day when everyone goes home to their families
First of all, none of the above has anything to do with whether or not law enforcement officers are prone to the same sins and temptations that the rest of humanity is, or whether or not an officers testimony in court carries water. So, I'm not sure what the overall point of your post is unless it's to suggest that your child rearing was brilliant, or that your child's experiences somehow epitomize all that is law enforcement...?

Obviously you have to let them do their jobs, and obviously you need to cooperate, but you don't stand blindly by and say their aren't morally incorrect, liars, and even bad people in law enforcement along with the good.

Internal affairs in around for a reason, because being in law enforcement doesn't make you are a saint.

AND, IN NO WAY DOES EVEN ONE TIME PUTTING YOURSELF IN A LIFE THREATENING SITUATION MAKE IT OK TO LIE IN COURT IN ORDER TO GET A CONVICTION!! And that does happen.. Will you say it doesn't? And if you concede that it is possible, then you'd understand the reson behind suggesting an officers camera might suit a great purpose if used to actually catch the incident on tape...

Last edited by SunnyKayak; 04-12-2011 at 08:23 PM.. Reason: flaming
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Old 04-12-2011, 08:11 PM
 
Location: Up above the world so high!
45,269 posts, read 88,615,347 times
Reputation: 39870
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rampart2 View Post
.

My comments to NDAlum are very sincere,
I have the utmost respect for those in law enforcement, epecially the officers of CMPD.

Last edited by SunnyKayak; 04-12-2011 at 08:30 PM.. Reason: the referring post is edited
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Old 04-12-2011, 08:29 PM
 
Location: Up above the world so high!
45,269 posts, read 88,615,347 times
Reputation: 39870
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rampart2 View Post
I've done my fair share sweetheart, and I don't need to explain it for you or anyone else. I've put my life on the line for what our government tells us was your "freedom".. And have seen probably 100 times more true life threatening situations than your average law enforcement officer that hasn't been in the military. Believe it or not, there are officers that never, ever see an incident of violence directed at them or have ever been in life threatening situations..

It's not all cops and robbers out there. As much as you'd like to dramatize it...



First of all, none of the above has anything to do with whether or not law enforcement officers are prone to the same sins and temptations that the rest of humanity is, or whether or not an officers testimony in court carries water. So, I'm not sure what the overall point of your post is unless it's to suggest that your child rearing was brilliant, or that your child's experiences somehow epitomize all that is law enforcement...?

Obviously you have to let them do their jobs, and obviously you need to cooperate, but you don't stand blindly by and say their aren't morally incorrect, liars, and even bad people in law enforcement along with the good.

Internal affairs in around for a reason, because being in law enforcement doesn't make you are a saint.

AND, IN NO WAY DOES EVEN ONE TIME PUTTING YOURSELF IN A LIFE THREATENING SITUATION MAKE IT OK TO LIE IN COURT IN ORDER TO GET A CONVICTION!! And that does happen.. Will you say it doesn't? And if you concede that it is possible, then you'd understand the reson behind suggesting an officers camera might suit a great purpose if used to actually catch the incident on tape...



Actually, I really AM a sweetheart, thanks for noticing

Sounds like you've served in the military - thanks for your service to the greatest nation on earth!
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Old 04-12-2011, 08:32 PM
 
Location: Charlotte, N.C. area
445 posts, read 681,566 times
Reputation: 513
Quote:
Originally Posted by lovesMountains View Post
Actually, I really AM a sweetheart, thanks for noticing
I will vouch for that!
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Old 04-12-2011, 08:34 PM
 
Location: Lakeside. Of course.
532 posts, read 1,571,620 times
Reputation: 1255
<shrug> YEARS ago, we lived right on Thermal (before there was a stop sign at Welford.) While the speed limit was 35, we used to watch the traffic whiz by at over 55 mph. We got pretty used to the cacophony of the traffic and the trains. We couldn't let our son outside to play in the front yard for fear that he'd chase after a stray ball and the drivers wouldn't see him. We later moved to north Charlotte and the first few nights were awed by the "quiet" we hadn't experienced in years.
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Old 04-12-2011, 08:38 PM
 
Location: Up above the world so high!
45,269 posts, read 88,615,347 times
Reputation: 39870
Quote:
Originally Posted by LakesideAnnie View Post
<shrug> YEARS ago, we lived right on Thermal (before there was a stop sign at Welford.) While the speed limit was 35, we used to watch the traffic whiz by at over 55 mph. We got pretty used to the cacophony of the traffic and the trains. We couldn't let our son outside to play in the front yard for fear that he'd chase after a stray ball and the drivers wouldn't see him. We later moved to north Charlotte and the first few nights were awed by the "quiet" we hadn't experienced in years.

Yeah, it's a shame it's become such a cut thru over the years. I'm actually glad to know CMPD is watching the area and writing tickets to offenders.
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