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Old 10-05-2011, 08:34 PM
 
Location: Chicago
38,690 posts, read 88,937,127 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CVP View Post
When my daughter was in high school she worked part-time at a rural diner. I recall many a night when she returned home with her apron pockets full of bills and coins...her tip money. She'd dump it on the living room floor and count it and proudly announce "I made $200 tonight in tips!" She saved thousands of dollars working that job in high school. It was hard work but she LOVED those tips!

On another note, my mother would base her tips on the total BEFORE taxes. She always said, "Why should I tip on the tax?" She had a point, but talk about splitting hairs! I always tip on the total bill and ALWAYS the amount prior to coupon discounts.
I tip on the pre-tax amount too. It may be splitting hairs, but around here sales tax is astronomical -- in some tax districts it's above 11%. Call me a tightwad but if we're already spending anywhere from $30 to $100+ for a night out and then anywhee from 9.75% to 11%+ on top of that, you can bet I'm taking that part out of the calculation. It's not value added by my server or the restaurant so I don't see why I should include it. Maybe sales tax isn't so crazy in Charlotte but here it can easily add another 10 bucks to the price of your meal.
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Old 10-06-2011, 08:13 AM
 
820 posts, read 1,526,778 times
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Default Tipping

Quote:
Originally Posted by bs13690 View Post
I was with you until all the way to the end of your OP. If I have to talk to the manager on account of the server screwing something up or giving poor service then why on Earth would I give a full tip? I also disagree with going straight to the manager. The server should have the opportunity to correct a problem him or herself. This is dependent, of course, on how big the issue is.

In regards to the coupon, we always tip what the full amount of the ticket would be (before tax) before the discount.
I amend to say that it depends on the server before I discuss with the manager. Good point on your part.
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Old 10-06-2011, 10:14 AM
 
11,836 posts, read 25,421,690 times
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The problem I've had with waiters & coupons is that for some unfathomable reason some of them don't list the original amount of the tab before the coupon is applied. Thus they are tipped on the amount after the coupon is applied. It takes a few seconds to list the original amount. Seems that they're shooting themselves in the foot. I also tip on the pre-tax amount.
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Old 10-06-2011, 12:02 PM
 
5,864 posts, read 7,687,263 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tober138 View Post
Knowing a few people in the restaurant business, I tend to disagree that "most people" are aware of this. From what I hear a lot of people tend to be fairly stingy tip-wise during Restaurant Week too.
I think most people know you're "supposed to" tip on the pre-coupon amount, but I guess some just choose not to.

But IMO restaurant week is a little different. I don't think you're "supposed to" tip on what the dinner would have cost if it wasn't restaurant week. For one, most of the restaurants come up with separate restaurant week menus, so you may not even know what it would have cost, especially if you've never been there before. Although of course it wouldn't hurt to throw in a little extra since restaurant week is always a very busy time for them. But similar to some coupons, restaurant week may be the only reason someone is at that restaurant, so if not for restaurant week (or the coupon), that restaurant may not be getting that person's business at all, so complaining about a bad tip may not be the best idea...

In general, obviously it's the accepted practice, but I never really understood why the tip has to be based on the amount of the bill. Waiters do pretty much the same thing regardless of how much the food costs, and they're not the ones making it. I ate at Denny's recently and left a 25% tip...of $5. But if you eat at Capital Grille you could leave a 15% tip of $15. Is the $5 tip really "better" than the $15 tip?
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Old 10-07-2011, 09:36 AM
 
Location: Ayrsley
4,714 posts, read 8,452,341 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GoPhils View Post
But IMO restaurant week is a little different. I don't think you're "supposed to" tip on what the dinner would have cost if it wasn't restaurant week. For one, most of the restaurants come up with separate restaurant week menus, so you may not even know what it would have cost, especially if you've never been there before.
Agreed, but from what I have heard, a number of the Restaurant Week diners tend to be fairly stingy with the tips based on the actual bill Along the lines of: 3-course meal for $30 per person, add in a drink or two and wind up with an $80 total, and then leaving an $8 tip.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GoPhils View Post
In general, obviously it's the accepted practice, but I never really understood why the tip has to be based on the amount of the bill. Waiters do pretty much the same thing regardless of how much the food costs, and they're not the ones making it. I ate at Denny's recently and left a 25% tip...of $5. But if you eat at Capital Grille you could leave a 15% tip of $15. Is the $5 tip really "better" than the $15 tip?
Percentage wise, I may be more inclined to leave a slightly larger amount (percentage wise) at a cheap diner (mainly because I remember waiting tables at cheap restaurants back in the day. But then again, I would say the level of service at Capital Grille is a lot higher than a Denny's.

But I also agree with you in part. If we go to dinner and order a $100 bottle of wine vs. a $40 bottle of wine, should the tip really go up $9-$12 simply because that bottle was $60 more than another we may have ordered? In either case, the waiter / waitress is going to bring the wine to the table, open it and pour the first glass, regardless of the price of that bottle. Granted it is rare that we order a terribly expensive bottle of wine at a restaurant, but on those few occasions when we do, my tip is usually closer to 15% of the total bill (when normally I usually do about 20% for good service).

I'm sort of the same when sitting at a bar for a drink or two before dinner, my tip is usually $1 per drink - if its someplace more upscale like Capital Grille or The Palm I may toss in a bit more on top of that. But really, the level of service required to pour me a Wild Turkey on the rocks is the same as pouring me an 18 year old McClelland on the rocks. Now if we're sitting at a bar for quite a while and going through several rounds, then I'll treat the bar tab more like a dinner tab in terms of the tip.
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Old 10-07-2011, 01:26 PM
 
Location: Shakedown Street
1,452 posts, read 2,565,974 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tober138 View Post
I'm sort of the same when sitting at a bar for a drink or two before dinner, my tip is usually $1 per drink - if its someplace more upscale like Capital Grille or The Palm I may toss in a bit more on top of that.
This is where I have a hard time - $1 to crack open a beer bottle, or pour a pint? If the beer is $4, that is a 25% tip on top of that. If it is a mixed drink I would do it. I usually open a tab with a credit card and tip well based on the total.

I can see if the place is busy you want to tip well early on so the bartender will take care of you quicker the next time.
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Old 10-07-2011, 01:41 PM
 
41 posts, read 142,307 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GoPhils View Post
In general, obviously it's the accepted practice, but I never really understood why the tip has to be based on the amount of the bill. Waiters do pretty much the same thing regardless of how much the food costs, and they're not the ones making it. I ate at Denny's recently and left a 25% tip...of $5. But if you eat at Capital Grille you could leave a 15% tip of $15. Is the $5 tip really "better" than the $15 tip?

I've always said this!!! so true!!
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Old 10-07-2011, 06:51 PM
 
32 posts, read 91,151 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by intellegentz View Post
I've always said this!!! so true!!
Same here...glad to see others agree.
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Old 10-08-2011, 06:56 AM
 
3,774 posts, read 6,983,939 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SB_Nikki View Post
Same here...glad to see others agree.
No, not really so true.

At Denny's a server may get to wait on 10 tables. They may have up to 30-35 people or more that they are collecting tips from since the "service" side of the job is pretty standard. They are not timing apps, salads and entrees, they are not making lattes and espressos, they are not decanting a $280 bottle of wine four times in one evening.

At a fine-dining establishment a server probably doesn't have more than 4 (maybe 6, rarely) tables, and 2 or 3 of those will be two-top tables. The management is very careful not to "overbook" any server, because top-quality service suffers significantly if the server is juggling too many customers. Fine-dining servers will be much more knowledgeable about food/wine pairings and should be able to answer, in-depth, any questions about any item on the menu... down to sauces and marinades. The hardest question at Denny's is "do you guys have Dr. Pepper or Mr. Pibb?"

A Denny's meal takes 15-30 minutes, a meal at a fine dining establishment often takes 90 minutes or more.

But it's true, that at the end of the day the server at the fine-dining place makes more money. And they should. They have received more training, they endure more stress and they are most-likely well trained at customer service. You don't have to worry about them sweating in your salad, or smoking right before they serve you dessert. I'd like to see Flo from Chili's trying to serve a bottle of '86 Chateau D'Armailhac! It's a skill, and people who order and appreciate 20 year old Bordeaux will usually tip accordingly.

I waited table for a while at a Relais & Chateaux restaurant... and trust me, it's stressful when you're trying to pop a cork and decant a $4500 bottle of wine in front of a table of patrons who are expecting nothing less than perfection. I made $300-500/night and sometimes more but I treated my job like a craft. I came to work and considered myself a professional, I practiced my craft, I read books about food and wine, I talked to the Chefs and visited other respected establishments as part of my preparation. And I earned my money!
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Old 10-08-2011, 09:54 AM
 
292 posts, read 590,712 times
Reputation: 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by Native_Son View Post
No, not really so true.

At Denny's a server may get to wait on 10 tables. They may have up to 30-35 people or more that they are collecting tips from since the "service" side of the job is pretty standard...

And I earned my money!
I would say the servers at Denny's earn their money as well. I imagine that waiting on so many people can be stressful. From what you described it does sound like you have to know more to work in the "finer" establishments and have more training, but that doesn't mean that people who work in more affordable establishments don't work as hard and have stress.

Also, I've never had anyone sweating into my food before. That sounds crazy. Did that happen to you before?
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