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Old 11-18-2011, 12:14 PM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
21,877 posts, read 27,138,998 times
Reputation: 8943

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Quote:
Originally Posted by anifani821 View Post
Over yonder, but not a fur piece. Past the holler and down by the branch.
Ani, you know that as a Midwesterner, I know where over yonder is & not a fur piece is the same as not a far piece. The rest is pretty easy.

I wasn't going to get involved with this thread based on the OP, after all I say hun-drid.

This sort of discussion always reminds me of reading Longstreet's account of his near capture at Chickamauga. He heard soldiers talking on the picket line & thought that he'd come across Bragg's army. It was a regiment from the Army of the Cumberland.

Last edited by southbound_295; 11-18-2011 at 12:40 PM.. Reason: typo
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Old 11-18-2011, 01:51 PM
 
5,869 posts, read 7,703,331 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bibit612 View Post
Ugh! Two people I work with always "aks" instead of "ask", in a conference call nonetheless.

And hubby is now fixin' to do something, and says " I wheeeeelll!" when asked to do something!

On the pike thing, up north, if you call the Mass Pike Massachusetts turnpike, you're definitely NOT a native.
I do agree that "aks" can be annoying, and I can't tell if you were even commenting about this one, but "fixin' to ...." is one phrase that I find a little odd (but not "peeved" by it at all!)
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Old 11-18-2011, 01:59 PM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,023,037 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GoPhils View Post
I do agree that "aks" can be annoying, and I can't tell if you were even commenting about this one, but "fixin' to ...." is one phrase that I find a little odd (but not "peeved" by it at all!)
I find "fixin' to" a puzzler, also, even tho I grew up hearing it - so you are not alone, lol. I always assumed it was some old English thing . . . or something Irish . . . with the same meaning as "getting ready to" . . . but I have never looked it up to find the roots of the phrase.

Y'all do know this one, right?

"If you don't stop, I'm fixin' to tan ya behind."

Note: in this case, "behind" is pronounced - Bee' hind (accent on first syllable)
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Old 11-18-2011, 02:02 PM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,023,037 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southbound_295 View Post
Ani, you know that as a Midwesterner, I know where over yonder is & not a fur piece is the same as not a far piece. The rest is pretty easy.

I wasn't going to get involved with this thread based on the OP, after all I say hun-drid.

This sort of discussion always reminds me of reading Longstreet's account of his near capture at Chickamauga. He heard soldiers talking on the picket line & thought that he'd come across Bragg's army. It was a regiment from the Army of the Cumberland.
Oh my. We will have to start a thread on Longstreet (history forum?) One of my favorites . . . Yes, goes to show - we all have roots somewhere, lol.
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Old 11-18-2011, 03:51 PM
 
373 posts, read 669,132 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anifani821 View Post
And when I ask people where they are from originally, they refer to some place I have never heard of before: Long Guy Land
What the hell is a "long guy?"
Well.
Not bragun (bragging)
but I think I got the ansa (answer) right heya (here).
You might need an amba-lance though.
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Old 11-18-2011, 03:53 PM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,023,037 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheesecracker View Post
Well.
Not bragun (bragging)
but I think I got the ansa (answer) right heya (here).
You might need an amba-lance though.
Just be sure to turn on the sigh reen as you go through my 'hood, lol.
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Old 11-18-2011, 06:49 PM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
21,877 posts, read 27,138,998 times
Reputation: 8943
Quote:
Originally Posted by anifani821 View Post
I find "fixin' to" a puzzler, also, even tho I grew up hearing it - so you are not alone, lol. I always assumed it was some old English thing . . . or something Irish . . . with the same meaning as "getting ready to" . . . but I have never looked it up to find the roots of the phrase.

Y'all do know this one, right?

"If you don't stop, I'm fixin' to tan ya behind."

Note: in this case, "behind" is pronounced - Bee' hind (accent on first syllable)
LOL, I also grew up with fixin' to, Ani, but my concept was that it denoted something that was going to happen, but not immediately.

When my mom was fixin' to do some tanning, she always said "If you don't stop that immediately, I'm gonna tan yer hide."
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Old 11-18-2011, 07:05 PM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
21,877 posts, read 27,138,998 times
Reputation: 8943
Quote:
Originally Posted by anifani821 View Post
Oh my. We will have to start a thread on Longstreet (history forum?) One of my favorites . . . Yes, goes to show - we all have roots somewhere, lol.
That sounds like a winner to me, Ani.
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Old 11-18-2011, 10:03 PM
 
301 posts, read 1,503,434 times
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Just the other day, at my regular Harris-Teeter supermarket, the cashier kept asking me "Don't you want some better?" I didn't know what she meant, had to ask her twice to repeat herself, but still didn't get it.

I'm a transplant from Buffalo NY (in Charlotte 3 yrs now) & usually have no problems understanding what people here are saying. Then again, I'm often talking to other transplants from the Northeast or from the Midwest. But at this supermarket, many of the workers there are native Southerners (and originally from Charlotte?)

To me, this cashier has a very "strong" Southern accent, but usually have no problem understanding what she's saying. Not this day, I was confused at why she thought I should have something "better." Finally, she pointed to an picture in the sales ad and I caught on: "Oh-- butter!"

"Yeah, a great deal on better," she stated. Well, I didn't need "better" but learned something about Southern pronounciation.

Of course, SHE has an accent but I don't!
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Old 11-19-2011, 07:09 AM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,023,037 times
Reputation: 22370
Quote:
Originally Posted by newbie09 View Post
Just the other day, at my regular Harris-Teeter supermarket, the cashier kept asking me "Don't you want some better?" I didn't know what she meant, had to ask her twice to repeat herself, but still didn't get it.

I'm a transplant from Buffalo NY (in Charlotte 3 yrs now) & usually have no problems understanding what people here are saying. Then again, I'm often talking to other transplants from the Northeast or from the Midwest. But at this supermarket, many of the workers there are native Southerners (and originally from Charlotte?)

To me, this cashier has a very "strong" Southern accent, but usually have no problem understanding what she's saying. Not this day, I was confused at why she thought I should have something "better." Finally, she pointed to an picture in the sales ad and I caught on: "Oh-- butter!"

"Yeah, a great deal on better," she stated. Well, I didn't need "better" but learned something about Southern pronounciation.

Of course, SHE has an accent but I don't!
Yes, only the natives have accents, lol.

Typically, you would hear very much the "UH" in "butter" in this part of the world. You got me on that one, Newbie. I think I would have had to wonder what the cashier meant, too.
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