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Old 10-18-2018, 12:16 PM
 
29,737 posts, read 27,153,434 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by meep View Post
And no, you can not put a big box store in central downtown around peachtree/fivepoints, itís too urban in layout. Downtown Atlanta is not like uptown Charlotte, please stop trying to compare them.

As far as putting big box stores in urban areas, you can do that. Midtown Atlanta (which is more similar to uptown Charlotte) has a high population density, which is technically urban, but its layout (unlike downtown Atlanta) is more conducive to box stores. Itís new and was built with that in mind. Downtown has more of a historic urban fabric.
There's plenty of space in other parts of downtown Atlanta for a full-service grocery store, even one with more of a big-box format. However, that wouldn't really be appropriate given the location.
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Old 10-18-2018, 12:51 PM
 
Location: Washington DC
3,750 posts, read 3,267,604 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GoPhils View Post
Of course, as a whole DC is more "urban" than ATL. But midtown ATL specifically is urban, and IMO it makes no sense to group Foggy Bottom with downtown DC but not group midtown with downtown ATL.

I don't know what Walmart is being referred to but, it is also about 0.9 miles from the Foggy Bottom metro stop to what appears to be roughly the geographic center of "downtown" according to Google Maps, the National Geographic museum.
I don’t mean to be rude at all, but this sounds like you don’t know DC at all.


The differences between ATL and DC’s urban build is soooooo different from DC or Philly or other cities that posters want to think it is. It would require its own complete separate topic - if at all. Just not comparable at all.


There’s no way you could outline the boundaries of downtown DC without knowing the city very well. That’s not the case with Downtown and Midtown Atlanta.. It’s beyond obvious. But you don’t drive a mile from the heart of “downtown DC” to a typical Walmart with a huge parking lot.

Quote:

The boundaries of the Downtown district are irregular and difficult to define.[2] Historically, downtown was bounded by Pennsylvania Avenue NW, New York Avenue NW, Massachusetts Avenue NW, and Indiana Avenue NW.[2] This area includes the Penn Quarter, Mount Vernon Square, Chinatown, and Judiciary Square neighborhoods. With the growth of the city, "downtown" is now considered to include Federal Triangle, the Pennsylvania Avenue National Historic Site, the K Street NW corridor west to Connecticut Avenue NW, and the Connecticut Avenue NW corridor below the Dupont Circle neighborhood.[2]

However, in 2004 Frommer's defined downtown's boundaries as 7th Street NW, Pennsylvania Avenue NW, 22nd Street NW, and P Street NW.[3] This definition includes the neighborhoods listed above, as well as Foggy Bottom, West End, Logan Circle, and the lower part of the Dupont Circle neighborhood.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Down...ashington,_D.C.


Atlanta, based on all that’s being said the last few post sounds more than ever like a giant Charlotte.
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Old 10-18-2018, 01:34 PM
 
5,869 posts, read 7,705,030 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Charlotte485 View Post
I don’t mean to be rude at all, but this sounds like you don’t know DC at all.


The differences between ATL and DC’s urban build is soooooo different from DC or Philly or other cities that posters want to think it is. It would require its own complete separate topic - if at all. Just not comparable at all.


There’s no way you could outline the boundaries of downtown DC without knowing the city very well. That’s not the case with Downtown and Midtown Atlanta.. It’s beyond obvious. But you don’t drive a mile from the heart of “downtown DC” to a typical Walmart with a huge parking lot.





Atlanta, based on all that’s being said the last few post sounds more than ever like a giant Charlotte.
Again, I'm not saying Atlanta is anywhere close to being as "urban" as DC as a whole. Just pointing out that if you are grouping all of DC's "urban sections" together, then you should at least be able to group midtown and downtown ATL together. The Walmart on MLK is neither in downtown nor midtown so I'm not sure how that's really relevant, other than saying it's "close" to downtown.

I'm not a DC expert, but I lived in Baltimore for a few years and have been several times. I was going off of the boundaries defined by google maps.
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Old 10-18-2018, 03:00 PM
 
3,454 posts, read 3,134,336 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
There's plenty of space in other parts of downtown Atlanta for a full-service grocery store, even one with more of a big-box format. However, that wouldn't really be appropriate given the location.
That's what I was thinking. I mean, is he talking about the same Atlanta? Even DC (urban city) has big box chains and regular ole grocery stores scattered throughout the city.
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Old 10-18-2018, 04:07 PM
 
Location: Washington DC
3,750 posts, read 3,267,604 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GoPhils View Post
Again, I'm not saying Atlanta is anywhere close to being as "urban" as DC as a whole. Just pointing out that if you are grouping all of DC's "urban sections" together, then you should at least be able to group midtown and downtown ATL together. The Walmart on MLK is neither in downtown nor midtown so I'm not sure how that's really relevant, other than saying it's "close" to downtown.

I'm not a DC expert, but I lived in Baltimore for a few years and have been several times. I was going off of the boundaries defined by google maps.

But boundaries defined by google maps doesnít really reflect reality here.


The downtown of DC, which in general terms, lots can and do consider the lower portions of DuPont, Foggy, Chinatown, etc to be it.

The ďurban sectionsĒ of DC to me would be the downtown of DC AND Bethesda, Silver Spring, Alexandria, Pentagon City, Rosslyn, Ballston, Clarendon, Crystal City.....


But as you say, Atlanta isnít as close to being as urban as DC. Thatís not really my point, rather my point is the built urban environments of Charlotte and Atlanta are similar with one being on a large scale. I only use DC because I use places in familiar with. FYI. Atlanta seems pretty different from Phoenix and Albuquerque and cities in other regions.

Itís much more difficult to drawn comparisons - in my mind - between Baltimore and Atlanta or Baltimore and Charlotte vs. Atlanta and Charlotte. Charlotte is bigger than Pittsburgh in both city and metro and I think overall. Theyíre both very similar in size. But I still feel in general, Charlotte and Atlanta are more similar than Pittsburgh is to Charlotte.

I could see the case being made Houston and Dallas are similar to Atlanta. But beyond Charlotte, Austin, Dallas, Raleigh and Houston.... Atlanta seems fairly different from the rest.
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Old 10-18-2018, 04:19 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
829 posts, read 569,365 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Charlotte485 View Post
Iím not putting Atlanta in any place. Iím saying to calm your panties that ATL is so mind blowingly different than CLT. It induces eye rolls. I think your entire point, ironically, is to put Charlotte ďin its placeĒ (since you think Iím doing that to ATL.)

I donít really care to explain the differences between the urbanity of DC vs. ATL. Itís night & day. The differences are far to great and youíre talking about a Walmart 1 mile away versus Foggy Bottom. You donít get it.

Foggy Bottom & downtown DC


DuPont & downtown DC


DuPont, Foggy, downtown, Logan, China town




And you compare it to the very suburban Walmart thatís not urban in anyway.


And honestly, again, thatís why itís like a bigger Charlotte and/or a bigger - and I think slightly lower quality - version of Raleigh (though I like Atlanta more than Raleigh, Iím not sure being bigger makes ATLís education or tech scene or QOL any better than RDU)


A lot of what is being described is so similar to Charlotte except ATLís Marta is bigger (but CLTís Lynx is just as good on scale and goes to the major destinations), Atlanta is grittier (not a quality most people care for) and is a Capitol. Other than that, it is very similar to CLT just bigger.

And FYI. If I was insulting Atlanta... I would basically be saying, by own logic, Charlotte is just a smaller disappointment than Atlanta
Sigh. I donít know what your point is suppose to be with those pictures? You donít dictate where neighborhoods end for DC. Iím sure they merge together at their edges, still distinct areas, BUT...Vine City (where the Walmart is located) does this with downtown Atl. Itís not suburban. Again, itís not even a mile from the stadium is located, which is downtown Atlanta. Itís a quarter mile from Clark Atlanta ó an urban campus. Stop trying twist this to support your contention. Please.

Iím not trying to say Atlanta blows anything away, but downtown isnít like your uptown. Thatís either dishonest or shows you havenít spent time in one of them. Thatís all.
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Old 10-18-2018, 04:23 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
829 posts, read 569,365 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
There's plenty of space in other parts of downtown Atlanta for a full-service grocery store, even one with more of a big-box format. However, that wouldn't really be appropriate given the location.
Umm, he means what is technically defined as central downtown on a map. He would just say greater downtown neighborhoods arenít downtown, itís a semantic game. The vine city wall mart is considered suburban to that poster lol.
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Old 10-18-2018, 05:36 PM
 
29,737 posts, read 27,153,434 times
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This is all really besides the point. Downtown Atlanta doesn't have a full-service grocery store (and it doesn't need to be big box to be full-service) because the vast majority of commercial and residential development in the core of the city in the past three decades has gone to Midtown. Most of the development in downtown Atlanta during that time has either been tourist- or GSU-related. But with plans in place to redevelop Underground (which may include a national grocer) and south downtown, I suspect it won't be long until downtown gets one.

Hopefully this clears some stuff up.
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Old 10-18-2018, 05:38 PM
 
Location: Washington DC
3,750 posts, read 3,267,604 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by meep View Post
Sigh. I don’t know what your point is suppose to be with those pictures? You don’t dictate where neighborhoods end for DC. I’m sure they merge together at their edges, still distinct areas, BUT...Vine City (where the Walmart is located) does this with downtown Atl. It’s not suburban. Again, it’s not even a mile from the stadium is located, which is downtown Atlanta. It’s a quarter mile from Clark Atlanta — an urban campus. Stop trying twist this to support your contention. Please.

I’m not trying to say Atlanta blows anything away, but downtown isn’t like your uptown. That’s either dishonest or shows you haven’t spent time in one of them. That’s all.



You don’t get it. It’s fine.





You seriously don’t get it. This supposed Walmart is beyond suburban.


I can’t believe anyone would compare “vine city” to Foggy Bottom or Penn or DuPont or ChinaTown, etc . To me, it screams WestEnd Charlotte... westend might be a little more urban though. Maybe Optimist Park.


And again. You convince me even more, the two cities are very similar




^ sooooooo Charlotte.
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Old 10-18-2018, 05:41 PM
 
29,737 posts, read 27,153,434 times
Reputation: 18269
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charlotte485 View Post
You donít get it. Itís fine.





You seriously donít get it. This supposed Walmart is beyond suburban.


I canít believe anyone would compare ďvine cityĒ to Foggy Bottom or Penn or DuPont or ChinaTown, etc . To me, it screams WestEnd Charlotte... westend might be a little more urban though. Maybe Optimist Park.


And again. You convince me even more, the two cities are very similar
You guys are obviously talking past each other. You're using the term "suburban" with respect to layout, whereas meep is using it in the more literal, traditional sense--located in the actual suburbs.
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