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Old 07-17-2012, 09:01 PM
 
6,270 posts, read 9,992,152 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
I don't think I denied that Charlotte has had more in-migration.
You could have saved yourself alot of time just by typing this statement and nothing more. I agree, Charlotte has more in-migration (which is exactly what this thread is about).
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Old 07-18-2012, 01:35 AM
 
3,914 posts, read 3,940,876 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
That's all a lovely story, but like most stories contains a whole lot of fiction.
I think urbancharlotte proved his point by switching to county statistics since county borders don't change. Pontificating about Tokyo, NYC, Dallas, Atlanta, etc are irrelevant and IMO nothing but distractions from the point made. I also disagree with some of your statements but I won't get into them since, in terms of places where people want to live, I notice that you no longer live in Columbus (based on your prof) It's easy to talk the talk, but quite another to walk the walk.
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Old 07-18-2012, 01:06 PM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
13,088 posts, read 13,420,738 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by frewroad View Post
I think urbancharlotte proved his point by switching to county statistics since county borders don't change. Pontificating about Tokyo, NYC, Dallas, Atlanta, etc are irrelevant and IMO nothing but distractions from the point made. I also disagree with some of your statements but I won't get into them since, in terms of places where people want to live, I notice that you no longer live in Columbus (based on your prof) It's easy to talk the talk, but quite another to walk the walk.
And the point was not that the Charlotte area hasn't grown population wise, but when it comes to the city, if the borders had stayed exactly the same, there simply wouldn't have been as much growth. And the argument can be made that annexation gives an inflated perception of growth and makes an area appear more popular for migration. This can and does play a role in regional growth, including at county and metro level. The real test will happen in the next few years. Will Charlotte's economy be able to recover? Will the housing boom return (a big part of the growth)? At what point does annexation run into the suburban borders and cut off the city's expansion? Booms come to an end. All of them. The question is not if, but when, and I don't think anyone can deny that there are certainly some negatives that exist today that didn't 5 or 10 years ago, or the last 50 years for that matter. Also, if Northern cities continue to improve and revitalize, what happens to that flow of in-migration from those places? Some cities have already reversed their losses, including Philly, Rochester, Dayton and Pittsburgh. Cleveland is on a building boom in it's downtown area and the population there increased almost 100% the last 10 years alone. Things are changing, and this will ultimately play a major role in where people continue to move. Not to say that Charlotte won't continue to grow, as I think it will, but it's best growth days may be behind it. And I didn't bring up those other cities, the other poster did.

And not that it's really any of your business, but the real reason I'm not in Columbus now is two-fold... a relationship and a job, the former being the main reason. It was easier to go to Mexico than the other way around in terms of immigration policy. I didn't leave because I wasn't happy there. It's a great city and I had a great life there with friends and a well-paying job. But there are instances where you have to make tough choices and I did. I chose a person over a city. At some point, though, I will return, but in the meantime, there's nothing wrong with experiencing other parts of the world.
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Old 07-18-2012, 02:47 PM
 
3,914 posts, read 3,940,876 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post

And not that it's really any of your business, but the real reason I'm not in Columbus now.....
The reasons that you left Columbus are yours and I don't care to know them. People migrate for all sorts of reasons and the statistics being cited here don't care about these specifics either. What one should learn from this, and you are living it yourself, is that generalizations don't even begin to tell the story as to why people move from A to B.
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Old 07-19-2012, 10:20 AM
 
3,451 posts, read 3,132,169 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
And the point was not that the Charlotte area hasn't grown population wise, but when it comes to the city, if the borders had stayed exactly the same, there simply wouldn't have been as much growth. And the argument can be made that annexation gives an inflated perception of growth and makes an area appear more popular for migration. This can and does play a role in regional growth, including at county and metro level. The real test will happen in the next few years. Will Charlotte's economy be able to recover? Will the housing boom return (a big part of the growth)? At what point does annexation run into the suburban borders and cut off the city's expansion? Booms come to an end. All of them. The question is not if, but when, and I don't think anyone can deny that there are certainly some negatives that exist today that didn't 5 or 10 years ago, or the last 50 years for that matter. Also, if Northern cities continue to improve and revitalize, what happens to that flow of in-migration from those places? Some cities have already reversed their losses, including Philly, Rochester, Dayton and Pittsburgh. Cleveland is on a building boom in it's downtown area and the population there increased almost 100% the last 10 years alone. Things are changing, and this will ultimately play a major role in where people continue to move. Not to say that Charlotte won't continue to grow, as I think it will, but it's best growth days may be behind it. And I didn't bring up those other cities, the other poster did.

And not that it's really any of your business, but the real reason I'm not in Columbus now is two-fold... a relationship and a job, the former being the main reason. It was easier to go to Mexico than the other way around in terms of immigration policy. I didn't leave because I wasn't happy there. It's a great city and I had a great life there with friends and a well-paying job. But there are instances where you have to make tough choices and I did. I chose a person over a city. At some point, though, I will return, but in the meantime, there's nothing wrong with experiencing other parts of the world.
That's not true, without annexation Charlotte city proper might reflect less population size but the MSA/CSA would be the same. I don't put too much weight on city proper population but more so on MSA/CSA; it's a better indication of city/metro area growth/size.

I think southern or sun belt cities are focusing on urban core development and vibrancy. Sure, the burbs will always be the more popular destination but there are a multitude of urban living options in the south that were nonexistent 25+ years ago.

The neck pace growth rate in Raleigh, Charlotte, Atlanta, etc was/is straining many aspects of the transportation infrastructure. The NC Department of Transportation seemed to have deer-in-head-light stare, especially when it comes to Charlotte. Some of the interstate interchanges (I-85/I-77) were designed to handle traffic in Mayberry...it's absolutely mindboggling.
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Old 07-19-2012, 12:02 PM
 
3,185 posts, read 5,758,064 times
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Any figures are just a joke, You see we have thousands and thousands and thousands and thousands and thousands of people here that havent been counted.
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Old 07-19-2012, 08:21 PM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
13,088 posts, read 13,420,738 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Aristotle View Post
That's not true, without annexation Charlotte city proper might reflect less population size but the MSA/CSA would be the same. I don't put too much weight on city proper population but more so on MSA/CSA; it's a better indication of city/metro area growth/size.

I think southern or sun belt cities are focusing on urban core development and vibrancy. Sure, the burbs will always be the more popular destination but there are a multitude of urban living options in the south that were nonexistent 25+ years ago.

The neck pace growth rate in Raleigh, Charlotte, Atlanta, etc was/is straining many aspects of the transportation infrastructure. The NC Department of Transportation seemed to have deer-in-head-light stare, especially when it comes to Charlotte. Some of the interstate interchanges (I-85/I-77) were designed to handle traffic in Mayberry...it's absolutely mindboggling.
If a core city has boom growth, it creates a perception of a "hot" area to move to. While it won't count for all the growth, certainly, perception plays a big role in how areas are perceived. After all, quite a few people still believe that the North is full of Rust Belt cities in decline when the reality is different.
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Old 07-19-2012, 08:33 PM
 
Location: livin' the good life
2,147 posts, read 3,658,858 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
If a core city has boom growth, it creates a perception of a "hot" area to move to. While it won't count for all the growth, certainly, perception plays a big role in how areas are perceived. After all, quite a few people still believe that the North is full of Rust Belt cities in decline when the reality is different.
As the saying goes 'perception is reality' ...the perception is that Charlotte is a great place to move to and the people that come here usually aren't disappointed. The weather is quite fine as well. It seems you have difficulty with the concept that Charlotte is one of the more desireable cities to move to and continues to see steady growth. Live with it.
Yes I have lived in the rust belt, lived in the wonderful town of Chagrin Falls (CLE) and lived in Columbus (Dublin) and they are both very nice towns. I find many of folks down here from both those areas and they would never move back.
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Old 07-21-2012, 09:33 AM
 
29,696 posts, read 27,123,188 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
If a core city has boom growth, it creates a perception of a "hot" area to move to. While it won't count for all the growth, certainly, perception plays a big role in how areas are perceived.
It's mostly metro growth that creates that perception. For instance, Atlanta's official city population in the last census fell woefully short of the estimates, as the actual municipality only added a little over 3K people from 2000-2010 (the estimate was 121K people off). The city of Dallas added less than 10K residents in the last decade which amounted to an 0.8% increase in the last decade, the lowest rate of growth since official decennial municipal figures are available for the city (going back to 1870). Yet these two metros are still by and large seen as "it" cities for migration.

Quote:
After all, quite a few people still believe that the North is full of Rust Belt cities in decline when the reality is different.
No, but the Rust Belt metros still posted population loss in the last decade. They may be seeing trends begin to reverse, but the fact of the matter is that they are still in the hole by and large. The other Northern metros aren't necessarily booming, but they register average, respectable annual/decennial growth rates.
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Old 07-21-2012, 02:00 PM
 
248 posts, read 525,380 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ZnGuy View Post
As the saying goes 'perception is reality' ...the perception is that Charlotte is a great place to move to and the people that come here usually aren't disappointed. The weather is quite fine as well. It seems you have difficulty with the concept that Charlotte is one of the more desireable cities to move to and continues to see steady growth. Live with it.
Yes I have lived in the rust belt, lived in the wonderful town of Chagrin Falls (CLE) and lived in Columbus (Dublin) and they are both very nice towns. I find many of folks down here from both those areas and they would never move back.

Ive met many people from Charlotte who no longer liver there and are now in COlumbus that say the same about Charlotte as well
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