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Old 09-01-2013, 07:46 PM
 
5,102 posts, read 5,979,372 times
Reputation: 3116

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Quote:
You want Charlotte to grow the city center but don't want a new office building to be built there because of potential traffic issues?
What? No, that's not what I said at all.
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Old 09-02-2013, 12:15 AM
NDL
 
Location: Gaston County
3,188 posts, read 3,645,980 times
Reputation: 2085
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeP View Post
I'm just saying that Charlotte should do all it can to maintain and grow the city center. Suburban offices are a given, but Charlotte has a nice downtown to build on.
I couldn't agree with you more.

While I do think it's wise having a diversity of business districts/zones, many of Charlottes suburbs are growing rapidly - which will do nothing but tax an (already) overtaxed 77/85/485.

Traffic is a serious, quality of life issue.

Many of the new urbanism concepts used in planning CLT are an abysmal failure. Example: in many older style American cities, (e.g. NYC), a resident needing groceries, can literally run down the block to the corner store. If he or she wants a bite to eat, they are within walking distance of a restaurant, bar, etc. Likewise, they can usually depend upon mass transit, to commute to work.

Conversely, if you're in South Charlotte, you're screwed. If you live in South Charlotte, you're dependant upon your car to go to work, even if you work in S CLT. The grocery store might be a few miles down the road, but you haven't any means to get there, sans your car. Same with dining. (South) Charlotte promotes a lifestyle that's way too car dependant.

The City has responded by spending tens of millions of dollars on dedicated bike lanes, which aren't practical for regular use. I can't imagine masses of white collar professionals biking to work, in a subtropical environment that is the South.

Conversely, in older American cities, it is quite popular for people to go out at night, and walk, or use mass transit, as a means of transportation.

The medium density building in areas like South End, are a good idea, supported by light rail. Plaza Midwood is reasonably close to Downtown CLT, and the City has promoted sensible planning that encourages residents to walk and bike.

But areas like Ballantyne, Old Providence, Arboretum, Steele Creek...they're designed in a way that's far too car dependant, to suggest that spending tens of millions of dollars on bike lanes, will somehow mediate traffic issues. And it boggles the mind that they continue to develop these areas in ways that are car dependant.
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Old 09-02-2013, 08:41 AM
 
Location: Charlotte
1,399 posts, read 1,876,013 times
Reputation: 827
Quote:
Originally Posted by NDL View Post
I couldn't agree with you more.

While I do think it's wise having a diversity of business districts/zones, many of Charlottes suburbs are growing rapidly - which will do nothing but tax an (already) overtaxed 77/85/485.

Traffic is a serious, quality of life issue.

Many of the new urbanism concepts used in planning CLT are an abysmal failure. Example: in many older style American cities, (e.g. NYC), a resident needing groceries, can literally run down the block to the corner store. If he or she wants a bite to eat, they are within walking distance of a restaurant, bar, etc. Likewise, they can usually depend upon mass transit, to commute to work.

Conversely, if you're in South Charlotte, you're screwed. If you live in South Charlotte, you're dependant upon your car to go to work, even if you work in S CLT. The grocery store might be a few miles down the road, but you haven't any means to get there, sans your car. Same with dining. (South) Charlotte promotes a lifestyle that's way too car dependant.

The City has responded by spending tens of millions of dollars on dedicated bike lanes, which aren't practical for regular use. I can't imagine masses of white collar professionals biking to work, in a subtropical environment that is the South.

Conversely, in older American cities, it is quite popular for people to go out at night, and walk, or use mass transit, as a means of transportation.

The medium density building in areas like South End, are a good idea, supported by light rail. Plaza Midwood is reasonably close to Downtown CLT, and the City has promoted sensible planning that encourages residents to walk and bike.

But areas like Ballantyne, Old Providence, Arboretum, Steele Creek...they're designed in a way that's far too car dependant, to suggest that spending tens of millions of dollars on bike lanes, will somehow mediate traffic issues. And it boggles the mind that they continue to develop these areas in ways that are car dependant.
Why is being car dependent in a specific area a bad thing? Is it okay to stop development to areas that aren't served by light rail?
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Old 09-02-2013, 09:33 AM
 
Location: Inactive Account
1,508 posts, read 2,479,189 times
Reputation: 966
There nothing inherently wrong about preferring urban life. But it isn't the mindset of US citizens in general.

I doubt car dependent development will disappear in our lifetimes. Even if gas was $10 a gallon, some people will make sacrifices elsewhere in their lives (drive a smaller car, or get rid of an extra one, buy an electric vehicle, or a moto, or heck meet the neighbors and work out some rideshares).

Generally, people rasing children want a yard for the dog, and separation from neighbors so that nobody needs to complain about the children playing and making noise. Plus those who like having a garden, or simply want to be left alone. There are exceptions of course, but just browse this forum for a day and you can tell it is often the young couples without kids and the empty nesters looking for an interesting urban life. The families focus on "good schools" and "reasonable commutes".

Last edited by Sean_CLT; 09-02-2013 at 09:57 AM..
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Old 09-03-2013, 08:10 PM
NDL
 
Location: Gaston County
3,188 posts, read 3,645,980 times
Reputation: 2085
Quote:
Originally Posted by Austincool View Post
Why is being car dependent in a specific area a bad thing? Is it okay to stop development to areas that aren't served by light rail?
Charlotte is not designing it's infrastructure in a way that will support car dependancy *and* greater density.

Take Rea Road, in Olde Providence, for example: taxpayers are forking over millions of dollars for road improvements, and the implementation of center turning lanes are a needed improvement. But instead of widening the roadway from two lanes to four, they're spending millions of dollars to construct bike lanes. Foolish.

East Blvd in Dilworth was the victim of "traffic calming." The City spent taxpayer money on narrowing the road, from four lanes travel lanes, to two.

Neither one of the above areas have access to light rail. This forces people into their cars. But instead of building roads with sufficient capacity, the City is installing bike lanes - as if a family is going to ride their bicycles to Target or Lowe's.

That isn't to say that the City isn't doing a lot of good. I think Charlotte's park system, and greenways, are great ideas. But the obsession with bike lanes, in lieu of vehicle travel lanes...bad idea.
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Old 09-09-2013, 08:18 PM
 
53 posts, read 82,636 times
Reputation: 33
Yet another 1,350 foot tower was revealed today for NY. This will bring its total 1,000 foot towers built since 2010 to 10, including the following 6 that meet or exceed 1,300 feet:

1 WTC
2 WTC
432 Park Avenue
One Hudson Yards
107 W 57th
217 W 57th

It's time for Charlotte to get one.




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Old 09-09-2013, 08:40 PM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
11,810 posts, read 18,799,113 times
Reputation: 11136
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShlomoLowenstein View Post
Yet another 1,350 foot tower was revealed today for NY. This will bring its total 1,000 foot towers built since 2010 to 10, including the following 6 that meet or exceed 1,300 feet:

1 WTC
2 WTC
432 Park Avenue
One Hudson Yards
107 W 57th
217 W 57th

It's time for Charlotte to get one.



God that second one is U-G-L-Y.
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Old 09-09-2013, 08:57 PM
 
53 posts, read 82,636 times
Reputation: 33
If you think that's ugly, you should see 8 Spruce and 56 Leonard, two 900 foot monuments to NY craziness. While our towers in Charlotte might be short and boring, at least they're not crazy!

8 Spruce



56 Leonard


With respect to NY's new "low rises," these 2 crazy 500 foot shards of glass and Pyramid are under construction.

57th St Pyramid


400 Park Ave South


35 W15th St


950 feet of crazy curves rising in Midtown

I'll take the good ol' Catalyst over that nonsense anyday!


Last edited by ShlomoLowenstein; 09-09-2013 at 09:54 PM..
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Old 09-10-2013, 06:50 AM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
11,810 posts, read 18,799,113 times
Reputation: 11136
I actually think that 8 Spruce is quite interesting and has an apparent design methodology to its madness.
56 Leonard looks like it belongs in Miami.
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Old 09-10-2013, 07:28 AM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
11,810 posts, read 18,799,113 times
Reputation: 11136
I actually think that 8 Spruce is quite interesting and has an apparent design methodology to its madness.
56 Leonard looks like it belongs in Miami.
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