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Old 01-17-2008, 02:35 PM
 
Location: Uptown CLT (4th Ward)
2,560 posts, read 7,719,628 times
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And also if they ever call for an icestorm...TRUST ME when I tell you this!

Go beforehand and purchase batteries and candles. We had an ice storm a few years back where people were without power for 7 days. We lost it for 2 (guess that is the advantage about living Uptown, they probably restore power there 1st since Duke Energy is headquarted Uptown...what you think) and I went everywhere to find batteries and candles the day of the storm. SOLD OUT! Went to Target, Home Depot, Lowes, Eckerds...etc...SOLD OUT!

Just a heads up.

THANK GOD for gas fire logs. I will always have heat and a little light from the logs!
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Old 01-17-2008, 02:36 PM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,165,475 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by njmdpanc View Post
OK I have to ask and this is probably geared more for a Charlottean native - why bread and milk?
Even with 4 people in my house, bread and milk can last a couple of days. The average ice or snow in Charlotte comes down, covers the roads, and melts in a couple of hours when the temperature goes up. So maybe the ice and snow will last 2 days.
Besides feeding kids (as Loves pointed out) - there is the risk of power outage - so you can't cook.

Now other members can correct me if my memory is fuzzy. I am sure about the 2002 storm b/c we had just moved in and not been here but a matter of days . . . and an ice storm hit and our power was off for five days. Lost everything in the freezer (had leftovers from T'giving in freezer)

Then I think the next year (or was it 2004?) our power was off twice. Once for three days, once for two days. We could not get out of our driveway b/c of the layer of ice (no matter how much ice melt - it won't help that stuff).

I keep a very stocked pantry, but bread and milk are perishables. If the power is off, you can feed your family:

Peanut butter sandwiches, tuna sandwiches, cereal w/ milk, peanut butter crackers, cheese sandwiches, berries w/ milk - plus all fresh fruits you may have. You can survive quite a few days like that. When you have kids, you can also use milk to make instant pudding, and you can add berries or fruit to the pudding.

When the power is off, then you grab meat out of the freezer and put it on the grill, assuming your grill is close to the house. You may fall and bruise your tuckus if you try to negotiate on icy steps, however!

We also keep canned sardines, as we like them, and eat them w/ crackers. Not for everyone, but great source of protein.

So there you have it. The bread and milk run is to keep everyone fed for several days.

Last edited by brokensky; 01-17-2008 at 02:38 PM.. Reason: add word
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Old 01-17-2008, 02:41 PM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,165,475 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SunnyKayak View Post
ok lovemountains answered your question but I want to ask a question back lol.

How does a snowblower work?

On T.V. it looks like a ground tiller that some how spits snow off to the side.
Does it have a vaccum and what is with those blade looking things?

Is it louder than a power washer?
Do you shovel a spot to put it down in and does it chop up your yard?
You use it like a lawnmower, but on the snow. It has blades, like turbines, that throw the snow up and out a chute. No vacuum, just movement from blades throwing the snow up and out. It is loud, but depends on size of motor how loud. I would say comparable to a lawnmower - about that loud.

You do not use it in your yard. Only on hard surfaces of walkway and driveway.

The blades are typically tough rubber. Works great in dry snow but not as well in wet snow.
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Old 01-17-2008, 02:51 PM
 
Location: Up above the world so high!
45,269 posts, read 88,542,478 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anifani821 View Post
Besides feeding kids (as Loves pointed out) - there is the risk of power outage - so you can't cook.

Now other members can correct me if my memory is fuzzy. I am sure about the 2002 storm b/c we had just moved in and not been here but a matter of days . . . and an ice storm hit and our power was off for five days. Lost everything in the freezer (had leftovers from T'giving in freezer)

Then I think the next year (or was it 2004?) our power was off twice. Once for three days, once for two days. We could not get out of our driveway b/c of the layer of ice (no matter how much ice melt - it won't help that stuff).

I keep a very stocked pantry, but bread and milk are perishables. If the power is off, you can feed your family:

Peanut butter sandwiches, tuna sandwiches, cereal w/ milk, peanut butter crackers, cheese sandwiches, berries w/ milk - plus all fresh fruits you may have. You can survive quite a few days like that. When you have kids, you can also use milk to make instant pudding, and you can add berries or fruit to the pudding.

When the power is off, then you grab meat out of the freezer and put it on the grill, assuming your grill is close to the house. You may fall and bruise your tuckus if you try to negotiate on icy steps, however!

We also keep canned sardines, as we like them, and eat them w/ crackers. Not for everyone, but great source of protein.

So there you have it. The bread and milk run is to keep everyone fed for several days.
December 4, 2002 ice storm - 4 very long cold days with no power at our house - bbrrrrrrr... Fortunately, I had just the week before purchased a new rated down to 0 degrees sleeping bag, which my son lived in for those days, LOL. Other neighbors were out 7 days that time. We basically shut off all the rooms in the house and lived in front of the fireplace - including sleeping there. Every once in a while we would go out to the driveway to start the car and sit in it after it got warm
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Old 01-17-2008, 02:52 PM
 
Location: The 12th State
22,974 posts, read 58,600,696 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anifani821 View Post
You use it like a lawnmower, but on the snow. It has blades, like turbines, that throw the snow up and out a chute. No vacuum, just movement from blades throwing the snow up and out. It is loud, but depends on size of motor how loud. I would say comparable to a lawnmower - about that loud.

You do not use it in your yard. Only on hard surfaces of walkway and driveway.

The blades are typically tough rubber. Works great in dry snow but not as well in wet snow.
Ok sounds like work

Winter is suppose to be vacation season between leaf blowing season and lawn mowing season.
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Old 01-17-2008, 03:10 PM
 
Location: State of Being
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SunnyKayak View Post
Ok sounds like work

Winter is suppose to be vacation season between leaf blowing season and lawn mowing season.
Sunny, it is work. Fer shur.

When all the Northern transplants refer to getting away from snow, one of the things they are meaning is - having to shovel or snow blow all the snow.

Some winters were not so bad in Kansas. Some were just horrific. I injured my back trying to shovel snow one winter. Bad stuff.

I bought a snowblower after that.

The streets got cleared . . . but the blades would pile up snow at the edge of the driveway. That stuff would harden and turn into an iceberg. Life just stops and you have to address your driveway. Once you do that - getting out on roads is no problem.

So yes . . .it is work. Add to that the tree limbs that fall due to ice or a heavy snow . . . and the ice/snow on your roof . . . ice dams . . .icicles. . . very damaging. And that mess falls off in sheets and you do not want to be around your roofline when it happens.

I did enjoy it there, tho. But I totally understand why so many people from cold regions move to the South.
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Old 01-17-2008, 04:16 PM
NCN
 
Location: NC/SC Border Patrol
21,135 posts, read 21,886,305 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by groove1 View Post
Power in Fort Mill went out twice overnight...hopefully it will stay on now.
Our outside night light went out and the night light in the bathroom went out for a second when the power flickered. I was so glad to see it come back on. We have an electric heat pump. We suffered through several days the last time we had a long outage. Next time I will be in a motel somewhere immediately.

There is an order to who gets their power back on first. Necessary places like hospitals are first, etc.

We went to Monroe earlier and they don't have nearly as much snow as we have less than 10 miles away. On the weather map, we were at the edge of the snow.
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Old 01-17-2008, 05:01 PM
 
Location: Moon Over Palmettos
5,975 posts, read 17,592,410 times
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Default Snowblower Anatomy

Sunny - to further your education on snowblowers, here's more:

There are some that are electric started...you plug it in, turn a switch, pump a choke button and hit start, except, it doesn't always start as easy as I said...you could drown it like I did. Like a lawnmower also, it has a manual override, that string that you yank over and over till the engine turns. As I yanked that puppy one time that I was trying to be a good Samaritan to my husband who still has 3 hours to a commute and already 6 inches of snow on our driveway, apparently, I tore my rotator cuff that year. It has a little chute like ani said that throws the snow on one side of the driveway. You reverse this with a little lever, so that on your return pass, it is on the side where you want to blow the snow onto. Eventually, you will have a snowbank on either side of you, so if that bank gets taller than the chute, the snow will just tumble back where you just plowed. To prevent that, you would have to level the bank a little bit...you take a shovel and push the snow to your neighbor's yard or on your lawn, whatever. If you are vertically challenged like me, then you have to lift that shovel almost as high as your head...March or April snow is especially fun, since it's exceptionally heavy! That increased the tear on my rotator cuff, eventually needing surgery and me having to be on disability for 8 weeks, excluding the therapy. The area that the snow blower clears may have ice but you can't leave it like that. It makes you slip, or it cracks your driveway, so you have to get the salt and sprinkle it on. It is the same salt that your kids will carry on the soles of their boots into your nice shiny hardwood floors...which you will have to watch out for and eventually refinish. And the saga continues each time there is a snowstorm, and every year you live there.

Does this sound like work enuff?
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Old 01-17-2008, 05:09 PM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,165,475 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bibit612 View Post
Sunny - to further your education on snowblowers, here's more:

There are some that are electric started...you plug it in, turn a switch, pump a choke button and hit start, except, it doesn't always start as easy as I said...you could drown it like I did. Like a lawnmower also, it has a manual override, that string that you yank over and over till the engine turns. As I yanked that puppy one time that I was trying to be a good Samaritan to my husband who still has 3 hours to a commute and already 6 inches of snow on our driveway, apparently, I tore my rotator cuff that year. It has a little chute like ani said that throws the snow on one side of the driveway. You reverse this with a little lever, so that on your return pass, it is on the side where you want to blow the snow onto. Eventually, you will have a snowbank on either side of you, so if that bank gets taller than the chute, the snow will just tumble back where you just plowed. To prevent that, you would have to level the bank a little bit...you take a shovel and push the snow to your neighbor's yard or on your lawn, whatever. If you are vertically challenged like me, then you have to lift that shovel almost as high as your head...March or April snow is especially fun, since it's exceptionally heavy! That increased the tear on my rotator cuff, eventually needing surgery and me having to be on disability for 8 weeks, excluding the therapy. The area that the snow blower clears may have ice but you can't leave it like that. It makes you slip, or it cracks your driveway, so you have to get the salt and sprinkle it on. It is the same salt that your kids will carry on the soles of their boots into your nice shiny hardwood floors...which you will have to watch out for and eventually refinish. And the saga continues each time there is a snowstorm, and every year you live there.

Does this sound like work enuff?
Ohhhh, Bibit - this brings back memories! I put tile in my foyer for this very reason. I hated that I couldn't put wood in the foyer (had it in rest of the house) but I knew what was going to happen!!!! AARRRGGGHHH. The salt was so damaging - to floors and to cars, as well! And yes - rotator cuff! Still suffering w/ that injury - rehab didn't do the trick and I don't want to have surgery for it. . . I had forgotten about how that injury got started - it was 14 years ago. Wow.

Yeah, no mystery why we are all here now, LOL. I loved Kansas City, but managing the snow . . . ungodly hard work - especially if you have a H who travels, and I did.
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Old 01-17-2008, 05:17 PM
 
Location: The 12th State
22,974 posts, read 58,600,696 times
Reputation: 14926
Quote:
Originally Posted by bibit612 View Post
Sunny - to further your education on snowblowers, here's more:

There are some that are electric started...you plug it in, turn a switch, pump a choke button and hit start, except, it doesn't always start as easy as I said...you could drown it like I did. Like a lawnmower also, it has a manual override, that string that you yank over and over till the engine turns. As I yanked that puppy one time that I was trying to be a good Samaritan to my husband who still has 3 hours to a commute and already 6 inches of snow on our driveway, apparently, I tore my rotator cuff that year. It has a little chute like ani said that throws the snow on one side of the driveway. You reverse this with a little lever, so that on your return pass, it is on the side where you want to blow the snow onto. Eventually, you will have a snowbank on either side of you, so if that bank gets taller than the chute, the snow will just tumble back where you just plowed. To prevent that, you would have to level the bank a little bit...you take a shovel and push the snow to your neighbor's yard or on your lawn, whatever. If you are vertically challenged like me, then you have to lift that shovel almost as high as your head...March or April snow is especially fun, since it's exceptionally heavy! That increased the tear on my rotator cuff, eventually needing surgery and me having to be on disability for 8 weeks, excluding the therapy. The area that the snow blower clears may have ice but you can't leave it like that. It makes you slip, or it cracks your driveway, so you have to get the salt and sprinkle it on. It is the same salt that your kids will carry on the soles of their boots into your nice shiny hardwood floors...which you will have to watch out for and eventually refinish. And the saga continues each time there is a snowstorm, and every year you live there.

Does this sound like work enuff?
Bless your heart!! Definitely welcome to the south and away from all that. Now leaf season seems like nothing
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