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Old 07-20-2011, 07:01 AM
 
Location: Union County
38 posts, read 65,219 times
Reputation: 18

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Hellman's? Miracle Whip? I grew up knowing that mayonnaise and Dukes are one and the same.
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Old 07-20-2011, 07:05 AM
 
1,661 posts, read 2,781,041 times
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While European cooking certainly influenced American cooking, a great deal of Carolina cooking was derived from Africa because of the slave trade. Slaves often cooked for the Plantations and many of the recipes were brought over and passed along. They were adapted to the types of crops grown here such as sweet pototoes, rice (SC was once the only source for it), tomatoes, and corn, greens, peanuts, etc. Much of what is identified as Southern cooking actually came from this source.

Carolina cooking was also influenced a great deal by local Native Americans. Most people don't realize that, corn, already discussed here many times, was a product derived from Indian cultivation of grasses over 1000s of years. It doesn't exist in nature. Hence the corn recipes that we see were based on what the natives were eating when people moved into this area.
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Old 07-20-2011, 07:09 AM
 
3,774 posts, read 6,978,743 times
Reputation: 4402
Quote:
Originally Posted by lmhelms View Post
Hellman's? Miracle Whip? I grew up knowing that mayonnaise and Dukes are one and the same.
No mayo but Duke's in my family. I don't think my father would have let you in our house if you were carrying a bottle of Miracle Whip! Hellman's would have elicited at least a raised brow.

Also distinctly southern IMO is Neeses's Livermush, fried squash and okra, sliced tomatoes and cucumbers at every meal, creamed corn, green bean casserole, biscuits and gravy, and who could forget north Americas first winery...muscadine wine!
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Old 07-20-2011, 07:11 AM
 
Location: Near the water
8,231 posts, read 11,565,718 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Native_Son View Post
No mayo but Duke's in my family. I don't think my father would have let you in our house if you were carrying a bottle of Miracle Whip! Hellman's would have elicited at least a raised brow.

Also distinctly southern IMO is Neeses's Livermush, fried squash and okra, sliced tomatoes and cucumbers at every meal, creamed corn, green bean casserole, biscuits and gravy, and who could forget north Americas first winery...muscadine wine!

Man oh man!!!!!
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Old 07-20-2011, 07:14 AM
 
1,661 posts, read 2,781,041 times
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Yeah, I didn't know what Miracle Whip was until I was in my early 20s and I met some people who moved here from Missouri that used it.
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Old 07-20-2011, 07:32 AM
 
1,661 posts, read 2,781,041 times
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Cube Steak isn't particularly Southern I don't think, but it was cooked alot here because it was cheap. This will take a pressure cooker to cook properly. This method can be used for round steak or any piece of meat that is on sale. The pressure cooker will make the toughest meat very tender and good.
  • Couple of pounds of cube steak. Buy it on sale.
  • Sliced Large Onion
  • Sliced Large Bell Pepper (green or red)
  • Can Mushrooms
  • Broth (water can be used if you have none)
  • Mix up a cup of flour, salt & pepper to taste, and optionally some paprika.
  • Flour the cube steaks in this mixture and sit aside for an hour. The reason for sitting these out for at least an hour is because the flour won't come off the steak when being cooked. if you don't have time you can skip this wait.
  • Keep the left over flour.
  • Heat up the pressure cooker and brown the cube steak. You might have to do several batches.
  • Return the steak to the cooker, add onions, peppers, mushrooms, cover with broth by about an inch.
  • Close up pressure cooker and cook at 10 lbs for 20 minutes or 15 lbs for 15 minutes.
  • Meanwhile take the left over flour and mix with a cup of water.
  • When the cooking time is done, take the pressure off the cooker and open.
  • Pour in the flour/water mixture and bring back to a boil. This will make an instant gravy.
  • Serve over rice, potatoes or noodles.
This recipe is very forgiving and can benefit from changes like adding wine or soy sauce or anything you think might to well with this combination.

Last edited by yantosh22; 07-20-2011 at 07:50 AM..
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Old 07-20-2011, 07:58 AM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
21,811 posts, read 27,068,128 times
Reputation: 8888
Quote:
Originally Posted by Native_Son View Post
No mayo but Duke's in my family. I don't think my father would have let you in our house if you were carrying a bottle of Miracle Whip! Hellman's would have elicited at least a raised brow.

Also distinctly southern IMO is Neeses's Livermush, fried squash and okra, sliced tomatoes and cucumbers at every meal, creamed corn, green bean casserole, biscuits and gravy, and who could forget north Americas first winery...muscadine wine!
I mentioned Miracle Whip in a post where I was illustrating that most 1950s foods were not indigenous to any specific area. Also, a lot of old recipes travelled with settlers. The person who I addressed it to got the point. My Midwestern mother wouldn't have had anything but Kraft mayonaise & Miracle Whip in her house. Well, except the time during the 70s when they rationed gas & the store ran out of Kraft & she bought Hellmans & nobody would touch the stuff. . .

Green bean casserole? It came off the O&C onion ring can! It spread like wildfire in the '50s.

Ani & I discussed the livermush thing long ago in an old thread. Livermush, liver pudding & scrapple are all related. She has old family recipes for all 3. Scrapple & liver pudding are available in the Philadelphia area. There are at least 5 brands of scrapple there. The link is the PA Dutch. Branches of a lot of those families are here.

LOL, people were afraid of tomatoes until the early 1800s.

Creamed corn????????????

Last edited by southbound_295; 07-20-2011 at 08:10 AM..
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Old 07-20-2011, 08:08 AM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
21,811 posts, read 27,068,128 times
Reputation: 8888
Quote:
Originally Posted by yantosh22 View Post
Cube Steak isn't particularly Southern I don't think, but it was cooked alot here because it was cheap. This will take a pressure cooker to cook properly. This method can be used for round steak or any piece of meat that is on sale. The pressure cooker will make the toughest meat very tender and good.
  • Couple of pounds of cube steak. Buy it on sale.
  • Sliced Large Onion
  • Sliced Large Bell Pepper (green or red)
  • Can Mushrooms
  • Broth (water can be used if you have none)
  • Mix up a cup of flour, salt & pepper to taste, and optionally some paprika.
  • Flour the cube steaks in this mixture and sit aside for an hour. The reason for sitting these out for at least an hour is because the flour won't come off the steak when being cooked. if you don't have time you can skip this wait.
  • Keep the left over flour.
  • Heat up the pressure cooker and brown the cube steak. You might have to do several batches.
  • Return the steak to the cooker, add onions, peppers, mushrooms, cover with broth by about an inch.
  • Close up pressure cooker and cook at 10 lbs for 20 minutes or 15 lbs for 15 minutes.
  • Meanwhile take the left over flour and mix with a cup of water.
  • When the cooking time is done, take the pressure off the cooker and open.
  • Pour in the flour/water mixture and bring back to a boil. This will make an instant gravy.
  • Serve over rice, potatoes or noodles.
This recipe is very forgiving and can benefit from changes like adding wine or soy sauce or anything you think might to well with this combination.
My mother made cubed steak & chicken-fried steak. (We've established in an old thread that chicken-fried steak is essentially known here as country-fried steak.) When we moved to the MidAtlantic, the only others who made them were also transplanted Midwesterners. Both were made in a big skillet
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Old 07-20-2011, 08:42 AM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
21,811 posts, read 27,068,128 times
Reputation: 8888
Quote:
Originally Posted by yantosh22 View Post
While European cooking certainly influenced American cooking, a great deal of Carolina cooking was derived from Africa because of the slave trade. Slaves often cooked for the Plantations and many of the recipes were brought over and passed along. They were adapted to the types of crops grown here such as sweet pototoes, rice (SC was once the only source for it), tomatoes, and corn, greens, peanuts, etc. Much of what is identified as Southern cooking actually came from this source.

Carolina cooking was also influenced a great deal by local Native Americans. Most people don't realize that, corn, already discussed here many times, was a product derived from Indian cultivation of grasses over 1000s of years. It doesn't exist in nature. Hence the corn recipes that we see were based on what the natives were eating when people moved into this area.
Yes, the SC rice was called Carolina Gold. Also, many Union prisoners during the Civil War had their 1st exposure to peanuts (goober peas). The Indians were also growing corn & using similar recipes in the other colonial areas.

Not only did old recipes travel with settlers, they would have travelled with the Native Americans. Look up the known interactions between the Lenni Lenape (English name for the tribe was Delaware) & the Cherokee.
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Old 07-20-2011, 09:35 AM
 
Location: Charlotte Girl, currently residing in Miami
149 posts, read 218,132 times
Reputation: 129
May not be authentic Southern, but I am, so I am posting it! Very simple and inexpensive and elegant to serve at brunches - I never have any left.

Pina Colada Cake

1 box White Cake Mix
1 Chop Stick
1 Can Frozen Bacardi Pina Colada Mix (thawed)
1 Tub Cool Whip
1 Bag Shredded Coconut

Cook cake mix according to package directions. Let cool.

Poke holes all over cake with chopstick.

Pour thawed Pina Colada Mix all over cake. Spread wth spatula, making sure all mix gets through all holes.

Heavily spread Cool Whip over cake.

Sprinkle heavily with Coconut.

Chill well and serve cold with hot coffee or other hot beverage.

Easy, elegant and under $10
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