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Old 01-17-2008, 07:35 PM
 
1,166 posts, read 3,548,420 times
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I meant to say the White Water Center!

Ani, that spoon bread recipe makes me hungry even if I'm an imported Yankee.

Last edited by BarbJ; 01-17-2008 at 08:08 PM..
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Old 01-17-2008, 08:06 PM
 
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Ladies, I'd love to give you Fran's (my mother-in-law's) recipes for both shrimp and grits and spoon bread but honestly I no longer have them. I make shrimp and grits from my own recipe which is really no recipe at all - just whatever comes into my head - surely influenced by the way they were prepared when last we ate them in a restaurant. My husband orders them about 65-70% of the time they are offered on a menu. As for the spoon bread recipe, I believe it's in DC at my daughter's condo. I gave her and my son most of their grandmother's original recipes and her old cook books when she died in the 90's. I can't retrieve the spoon bread from Sarah E. because she is currently working in Viet Nam, goes next to China, then Laos and Cambodia - won't be back for over a month. If you can remember to remind me, I'll ask her to send me a copy.
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Old 01-18-2008, 06:37 AM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,154,265 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BarbJ View Post
Ladies, I'd love to give you Fran's (my mother-in-law's) recipes for both shrimp and grits and spoon bread but honestly I no longer have them. I make shrimp and grits from my own recipe which is really no recipe at all - just whatever comes into my head - surely influenced by the way they were prepared when last we ate them in a restaurant. My husband orders them about 65-70% of the time they are offered on a menu. As for the spoon bread recipe, I believe it's in DC at my daughter's condo. I gave her and my son most of their grandmother's original recipes and her old cook books when she died in the 90's. I can't retrieve the spoon bread from Sarah E. because she is currently working in Viet Nam, goes next to China, then Laos and Cambodia - won't be back for over a month. If you can remember to remind me, I'll ask her to send me a copy.
Well, Barb, we will remind you later, but it sounds to me as tho SE probably has a lot more to deal with than trying to locate a recipe for us, Hee Hee. I can only imagine traveling all over Asia as she is now. WOW!!!! We will remind you later on in the year . . . Meanwhile, I will do some experimenting and see how that works out.

I do hope SE will have pics that she posts somewhere so we can get a link and see them!
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Old 01-18-2008, 07:19 AM
 
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I have a terrible memory, so will definitely need a reminder. SE will have photos as she is into photography and we gave her a new special lens for her already (according to her father) too elaborate camera. He fears thst she's a walking magnet for thieves with her photo equipment. But she does have her photos from her trip to India and Nepal in October posted on Flicker and I'll see if i can figure out how to get a URL so you can see them. She has some wonderful shots of villagers.

I looked in my Charleston cookbook last night and found a recipe for spoon bread which my husband thinks was probably very much like what his other used to make since she was born and raised in Charleston. Does that interest you? I can copy it if you like.
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Old 01-18-2008, 07:32 AM
 
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Default Great thread!

A great intro to Southern food is "The Gift of Southern Cooking" by Edna Lewis and Scott Peacock. Wonderful book, great stories & everything in it is delicious, especially soups.

If I remember right, it has a great recipe for pineapple upside down cake (or try with peaches) -- perfect for those of you with those cast iron skillets. Try it, works great.
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Old 01-18-2008, 07:57 AM
 
Location: State of Being
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BarbJ View Post
I have a terrible memory, so will definitely need a reminder. SE will have photos as she is into photography and we gave her a new special lens for her already (according to her father) too elaborate camera. He fears thst she's a walking magnet for thieves with her photo equipment. But she does have her photos from her trip to India and Nepal in October posted on Flicker and I'll see if i can figure out how to get a URL so you can see them. She has some wonderful shots of villagers.

I looked in my Charleston cookbook last night and found a recipe for spoon bread which my husband thinks was probably very much like what his other used to make since she was born and raised in Charleston. Does that interest you? I can copy it if you like.
When you find the time, Barb, would love to have it! Sounds like Loves wants it, too! The cooks out here wanna know more, LOL!!!!
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Old 01-18-2008, 07:59 AM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,154,265 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Plan R View Post
A great intro to Southern food is "The Gift of Southern Cooking" by Edna Lewis and Scott Peacock. Wonderful book, great stories & everything in it is delicious, especially soups.

If I remember right, it has a great recipe for pineapple upside down cake (or try with peaches) -- perfect for those of you with those cast iron skillets. Try it, works great.
Pineapple upside down cake is a favorite, but always love seeing other recipes. Thank you so much for the link!!!
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Old 01-18-2008, 08:01 AM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,154,265 times
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Originally Posted by BarbJ View Post
I meant to say the White Water Center!

Ani, that spoon bread recipe makes me hungry even if I'm an imported Yankee.
You have definitely earned title of Southerner by now, Barb! LOL!!! And I assumed you meant White Water Center, LOL. I had to stop and think about it a bit . . .but got it in the end!!!
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Old 01-19-2008, 12:02 PM
 
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Default Corn grits, niacin and pellagra.

I reported all of this talk of shrimp and grits, his favorite food, to my
husband, the biochemist, who is fascinated by the way that primitive peoples learned to adapt the available food sources to their nutritional needs. Native Americans, for example, depended heavily on corn in their diet. However, corn does not provide the necessary nutrient niacin unless it is first soaked in an alkaline solution of ashes or crushed limestone and water to soften the shell and release the niacin. He is intrigued by how the native Americans discovered this process; a fact which is still unknown. I thought some of you grits lovers might like to hear what he told me.

Although their indigenous predecessors on this continent knew of the necessity of soaking corn, the European settlers did not. Thus, in the early years of the colonies many people in the South who depended on corn grits as a diet staple suffered from pellagra, a body-wide disease that leads to dermatitis ,diarrhea and depression. It can even lead to death, if deprivation continues long enough.

During the years of slavery, slaves had to grind their own corn, soaking it first to soften the seed coat. Although laborious, this practice of grinding their own corn had benefits that didnít become apparent until after the Industrial Revolution. Unlike its counterpart on todayís tables, the corn doled out to slave families had a tough seed coat. Before it could be ground into meal or grits, it had to be soaked in an alkaline solution of ashes or crushed limestone and water, the traditional Native American practice that produces hominy. No one knew that the soaking released the bound-up niacin. After the slaves were freed and the country became more industrialized. Blacks went to work in mills and factories and began buying pre-ground cornmeal instead of soaking and grinding their own. Thus the niacin was not released. Around the same time, thousands of low-income people, both white and black, started showing signs of pellagra, still a potentially fatal disease with a then unknown cause. Not until the 1930s was the discovery made that pellagra results from niacin deficiency. It was at this time that the federal government began to encourage the eating of greens such as collards, mustard and kale - all rich in niacin - among the poor.
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Old 01-19-2008, 12:06 PM
 
Location: Up above the world so high!
45,269 posts, read 88,525,786 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BarbJ View Post
I reported all of this talk of shrimp and grits, his favorite food, to my
husband, the biochemist, who is fascinated by the way that primitive peoples learned to adapt the available food sources to their nutritional needs. Native Americans, for example, depended heavily on corn in their diet. However, corn does not provide the necessary nutrient niacin unless it is first soaked in an alkaline solution of ashes or crushed limestone and water to soften the shell and release the niacin. He is intrigued by how the native Americans discovered this process; a fact which is still unknown. I thought some of you grits lovers might like to hear what he told me.

Although their indigenous predecessors on this continent knew of the necessity of soaking corn, the European settlers did not. Thus, in the early years of the colonies many people in the South who depended on corn grits as a diet staple suffered from pellagra, a body-wide disease that leads to dermatitis ,diarrhea and depression. It can even lead to death, if deprivation continues long enough.

During the years of slavery, slaves had to grind their own corn, soaking it first to soften the seed coat. Although laborious, this practice of grinding their own corn had benefits that didnít become apparent until after the Industrial Revolution. Unlike its counterpart on todayís tables, the corn doled out to slave families had a tough seed coat. Before it could be ground into meal or grits, it had to be soaked in an alkaline solution of ashes or crushed limestone and water, the traditional Native American practice that produces hominy. No one knew that the soaking released the bound-up niacin. After the slaves were freed and the country became more industrialized. Blacks went to work in mills and factories and began buying pre-ground cornmeal instead of soaking and grinding their own. Thus the niacin was not released. Around the same time, thousands of low-income people, both white and black, started showing signs of pellagra, still a potentially fatal disease with a then unknown cause. Not until the 1930s was the discovery made that pellagra results from niacin deficiency. It was at this time that the federal government began to encourage the eating of greens such as collards, mustard and kale - all rich in niacin - among the poor.

Barb, this is fascinating - kudos to your hubby for sharing this info
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