U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > North Carolina > Charlotte
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 01-19-2008, 12:14 PM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,165,475 times
Reputation: 22373

Advertisements

Well this information on diet and nutrition was fascinating! I am going to share this w/ my son, who is majoring in health promotion. Wonderful info! Thank you so much, Barb - and thank your DH, as well!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-19-2008, 12:18 PM
 
Location: Up above the world so high!
45,269 posts, read 88,542,478 times
Reputation: 39866
Quote:
Originally Posted by anifani821 View Post
Well this information on diet and nutrition was fascinating! I am going to share this w/ my son, who is majoring in health promotion. Wonderful info! Thank you so much, Barb - and thank your DH, as well!
Barb's husband's info reminds me of this guy I have seen on cable a few times, don't know the name of his show or him, but he spends the whole show teaching you how to cook a particular thing while explaining the science of it all to you!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-19-2008, 12:27 PM
 
1,166 posts, read 3,548,736 times
Reputation: 378
Just a short PS -

At our house as the kids were growing up, it was common knowledge that you never asked Dad a food question at the table - if you mistakenly did, you knew that you might never want to eat that food again!!! (Or at best, your dinner would get cold as you politely sat there fork in hand - not in mouth - listening to his scholarly explanations.)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-19-2008, 12:32 PM
 
Location: Up above the world so high!
45,269 posts, read 88,542,478 times
Reputation: 39866
Quote:
Originally Posted by BarbJ View Post
Just a short PS -

At our house as the kids were growing up, it was common knowledge that you never asked Dad a food question at the table - if you mistakenly did, you knew that you might never want to eat that food again!!! (Or at best, your dinner would get cold as you politely sat there fork in hand - not in mouth - listening to his scholarly explanations.)
hahahahahahahahahahahahaha - I can just picture it!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-30-2009, 11:29 PM
 
54 posts, read 99,026 times
Reputation: 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by BRKLYN2CLT View Post
I define Southern Cooking as: meat with meat , with a side of fried meat & fried vegetables, topped off with an extra serving of lipitor!!! Just kidding!!!! Is there anything healthy in traditional southern foods?
Where did you hear this from? I was born and raised in Charlotte. My momma and I grew up canning beets, green beans (that I strung and broke), lettuce, loads of tomatoes, cabbage, carrots, muscadine grapes, apples, etc. Also, she sure IS the best biscuit maker in the world.

You really do need to lay off the stereotypes and quit lumping a group of people from a common area all together. It says a lot about your character when you do that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-07-2011, 11:13 AM
 
Location: Charlotte Girl, currently residing in Miami
149 posts, read 219,074 times
Reputation: 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by ilovethemountains2 View Post
Where did you hear this from? I was born and raised in Charlotte. My momma and I grew up canning beets, green beans (that I strung and broke), lettuce, loads of tomatoes, cabbage, carrots, muscadine grapes, apples, etc. Also, she sure IS the best biscuit maker in the world.

You really do need to lay off the stereotypes and quit lumping a group of people from a common area all together. It says a lot about your character when you do that.
same here. Grew up in Charlotte - mama is from Old Fort. I spent my summers with a huge tall basket of green beans. Stringing and breaking. Helped my mama can beets, sweet and sour pickles, vegetable juice, vegetable soup, green beans, corn, etc. etc.

My mama never fried anything except bacon lol. Southern Cooking is about using fresh ingredients.

we had a muscadine vine in the backyard. I remember standing there all the time in the summer eating those grapes. Also sucking on honeysuckle yum.

I guess you and I can agree to disagree about the best biscuit maker (MY mom) lol. I guess we are both biased ha ha.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-08-2011, 07:25 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn, New York
1,194 posts, read 1,565,027 times
Reputation: 1727
Southern cooking reminds me of going outside in the summer picking blackberries, scupernongs, muscedine grapes LOL oh and picking veggies such as cabbage and collard greens etc... Also picking peas before the frost came and sitting on the porch shelling them and complaining that my fingers were sore!! Of course traditional southern dishes which may vary from regions in the south
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-08-2011, 09:30 PM
 
Location: Durham UK
2,031 posts, read 4,702,881 times
Reputation: 1132
The Spartanburg Pellagra Hospital in SC was the nation's first facility dedicated to discovering the cause of pellagra. It was established in 1914 with a special congressional appropriation to the U.S. Public Health Service (PHS) and set up primarily for research.
Unfortunately, though they managed to induce and cure pellagra by feeding only corn and then returning to a balanced diet they initially failed to identify that it was Niacin (Vit B3) that caused the disease.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-09-2011, 05:30 PM
 
58 posts, read 107,172 times
Reputation: 71
My husband and I moved to NC about 3 years ago and with cooking being a big hobby for us we jumped right into southern recipes. Shrimp and Grits did not sound appetizing but after my first taste at a local restaurant we soon were researching recipes, now everyone who visits from out of state requests S&G. We found out how to make collard greens from an older guy who ran a ma and pa grocery store in Spencer, LOVE THEM! Although it took 2 attempts to figure out that rinsing the greens is very important. Collard greens have also been noted as one of the most healthful foods you can eat, it's up there with blueberries if you keep the sodium low. My cornbread has to have sugar in it although locals tell me it's not southern. And I have a hard time with restaurants listing macaroni and cheese as a vegatable, and no one I know would eat it as a main dish, it's only considered a "side". We tried livermush, once is enough. It is an aquired taste. We miss not having access to a good butcher and good bakeries that specialize in bread (they all specialize in desserts it seems), but we really like southern food and cooking and have gotten pretty good at it. One thing I have noticed though is the pride shown in soouthern cooking. We came from Minnesota which has some darn good cooks, but a conversation can go on forever regarding southern recipes and techniques! And it can be pretty hard to pry a recipe from a good cook!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-10-2011, 09:09 AM
 
1,661 posts, read 2,793,930 times
Reputation: 549
Shrimp and grits isn't Piedmont southern. Neither is cheese and grits. IMO, these were made up for non-Southerners. I grew up in the South and never heard of this combination until about 20 years or so when the transplants started showing up. Grits should only be eaten with a little butter or if you must some gravy. Another hugely favorite way to eat grits in these parts, which you will never see in the restaurants (except the ones only known to locals) is with stewed tomatoes that were home canned from the previous crop. These are the kinds of grits that I grew up with in Charlotte.

Southern cornbread absolutely doesn't have sugar in it. No Sugar. The batter also has to be poured in an extremely hot cast iron frying pan that was well oiled or greased. (put it in the preheating oven) Anything else is a cake that would be laughed at in the South. There is an episode of America Test Kitchen that shows exactly how to make Southern cornbread. I recommend watching it as it explains why you must use buttermilk, and the proper technique.

Collard greens are OK. My preference is for mustard and turnip greens. You should try these.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:



Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > North Carolina > Charlotte
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top