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Old 02-26-2008, 05:09 PM
 
158 posts, read 314,197 times
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OK Got it! Thanks ya'l I knew it was Union County as I am moving to Waxhaw in July. (OK call me silly for not knowing) I just couldn't pinpoint it. Sigh..... thanks again!
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Old 02-26-2008, 05:56 PM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC
713 posts, read 1,355,325 times
Reputation: 449
Quote:
Originally Posted by the 7 oh 4 View Post
How come the signs don't say "Welcome to Downtown Charlotte"...have you never seem them. They say "Welcome to Uptown Charlotte"
I remember this debate as far back as 12 years, and I'm pretty sure there *used to be* at least one sign around 77 that said "Welcome to Downtown Charlotte."

Does anyone else remember this, or am I getting senile?

(Regardless, I'm pretty sure they've changed them all by now.)
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Old 02-26-2008, 07:13 PM
 
Location: Charlotte NC
1,054 posts, read 1,464,501 times
Reputation: 931
I am new in town and respect the wishes of the locals and call it uptown, although every single time I say it there is a pause beforehand so I can remember that "in Charlotte, and possibly only in Charlotte, do they call what should be downtown, uptown". Sorry to the poster who thought it should be called uptown because of a "higher elevation" (I hope that was a joke), but areas are called uptown/downtown for specific reasons:

Noun
uptown
  1. (mostly North America) the residential part of a city, away from the commercial center
Noun
downtown
  1. (mostly US) either the lower, or the business center of a city or town
As the newspaper article said it was clearly called something different simply to change people's view of that area. Sort of silly, but, whatever, it's all good.
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Old 02-26-2008, 07:20 PM
 
Location: Charlotte NC
1,054 posts, read 1,464,501 times
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oh, I forgot about the original post....the way I see uptown is approximately a 12 x 12 square block area inside the 277 border.
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Old 02-27-2008, 10:25 AM
 
Location: Up above the world so high!
45,177 posts, read 57,278,628 times
Reputation: 38458
Quote:
Originally Posted by eman1200 View Post
I am new in town and respect the wishes of the locals and call it uptown, although every single time I say it there is a pause beforehand so I can remember that "in Charlotte, and possibly only in Charlotte, do they call what should be downtown, uptown". Sorry to the poster who thought it should be called uptown because of a "higher elevation" (I hope that was a joke), but areas are called uptown/downtown for specific reasons:

Noun
uptown
  1. (mostly North America) the residential part of a city, away from the commercial center
Noun
downtown
  1. (mostly US) either the lower, or the business center of a city or town
As the newspaper article said it was clearly called something different simply to change people's view of that area. Sort of silly, but, whatever, it's all good.

Actually, I wasn't joking. When you are approaching uptown from certain parts of Charlotte you see it in the distance because it sits on a higher piece of ground than its immediate surrounding area. I didn't say my definition was scientific, just that it has always made sense to me to call it "uptown" since when driving to it from my side of town I am going up in elevation when I approach it.
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Old 02-27-2008, 10:27 AM
 
Location: Uptown CLT (4th Ward)
2,560 posts, read 5,725,978 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lovesMountains View Post
Actually, I wasn't joking. When you are approaching uptown from certain parts of Charlotte you see it in the distance because it sits on a higher piece of ground than its immediate surrounding area. I didn't say my definition was scientific, just that it has always made sense to me to call it "uptown" since when driving to it from my side of town I am going up in elevation when I approach it.
loves is 1000% CORRECT as usual!

Named chaned to Uptown in 1987!

21 years ago!

I live UPTOWN...I should know!
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Old 02-27-2008, 10:34 AM
 
Location: Uptown CLT (4th Ward)
2,560 posts, read 5,725,978 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ultraviolet* View Post
I remember this debate as far back as 12 years, and I'm pretty sure there *used to be* at least one sign around 77 that said "Welcome to Downtown Charlotte."

Does anyone else remember this, or am I getting senile?

(Regardless, I'm pretty sure they've changed them all by now.)
There still is 1 sign coming southbound on I-85 getting onto southbound I-77 that says Downtown Charlotte. They need to replace that sign. Has been Uptown for 21 years now.
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Old 02-27-2008, 11:33 AM
 
1,159 posts, read 2,673,073 times
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Actually, the downtown vs uptown designation originally referred to Manhattan Island in NY. I found this in Wikipedia:
"The term is thought to have been coined in New York City, where it was in use by the 1830s to refer to the original town at the southern tip of the island of Manhattan.[1] As the town of New York grew into a city, the only direction it could grow on the island was toward the north, proceeding upriver from the original settlement (the "up" and "down" terminology in turn came from the customary map design in which up was north and down was south). Thus, anything north of the original town became known as "uptown", while the original town (which was also New York's only major center of business at the time) became known as "downtown" or "Lower Manhattan". During the late 19th century, the term was gradually adopted by cities across the United States and Canada to refer to the historical core of the city (which was most often the same as the commercial heart of the city).[2] It was not included in dictionaries as late as the 1880s.[3] By the early 1900s, downtown was clearly established as the proper term in American English for a city's central business district."
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Old 02-27-2008, 11:55 AM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC
713 posts, read 1,355,325 times
Reputation: 449
Quote:
Originally Posted by the 7 oh 4 View Post
There still is 1 sign coming southbound on I-85 getting onto southbound I-77 that says Downtown Charlotte. They need to replace that sign. Has been Uptown for 21 years now.
YES! Thank you. You don't know how much better that makes me feel, that I didn't imagine that.

I always think of uptown vs. downtown like that person defined above, maybe because I grew up near Manhattan.

But I'm more than happy to call it "Uptown Charlotte."

It sounds...righter?
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Old 02-27-2008, 12:37 PM
 
Location: Huntersville
1,852 posts, read 3,412,609 times
Reputation: 515
Quote:
Originally Posted by BarbJ View Post
Actually, the downtown vs uptown designation originally referred to Manhattan Island in NY. I found this in Wikipedia:
"The term is thought to have been coined in New York City, where it was in use by the 1830s to refer to the original town at the southern tip of the island of Manhattan.[1] As the town of New York grew into a city, the only direction it could grow on the island was toward the north, proceeding upriver from the original settlement (the "up" and "down" terminology in turn came from the customary map design in which up was north and down was south). Thus, anything north of the original town became known as "uptown", while the original town (which was also New York's only major center of business at the time) became known as "downtown" or "Lower Manhattan". During the late 19th century, the term was gradually adopted by cities across the United States and Canada to refer to the historical core of the city (which was most often the same as the commercial heart of the city).[2] It was not included in dictionaries as late as the 1880s.[3] By the early 1900s, downtown was clearly established as the proper term in American English for a city's central business district."
And this is why it should be downtown. Marketing campaigns mess it up for everyone! Historically a bigger city my have an uptown and a downtown, but Charlotte is not NY.

Last edited by Whytewulf; 02-27-2008 at 12:48 PM..
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