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Old 10-30-2017, 11:54 AM
 
376 posts, read 222,379 times
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Helpful walkability analyses: https://www.walkscore.com/
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Old 10-30-2017, 03:50 PM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC
3,356 posts, read 8,854,663 times
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Where i Live my walk score is Zero.

Nearest public transport is over two miles away with no sidewalk.

Which really is a shame, did not get my first car until I was in my 30's as I needed to at that point.

Highlands of Scotland had no need for a car.

Last edited by flyingscotsman; 10-30-2017 at 03:51 PM.. Reason: Added More
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Old 10-30-2017, 05:58 PM
 
528 posts, read 446,534 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GoPhils View Post
How many people are going to walk 15 minutes to a grocery store for example? Good luck getting all your groceries back - but at least now many have the option for delivery.
Typical American viewpoint...people walk more than 15 minutes with groceries in other countries (including wealthy developed ones)...
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Old 10-30-2017, 07:39 PM
 
5,863 posts, read 7,679,286 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shunketsu View Post
Typical American viewpoint...people walk more than 15 minutes with groceries in other countries (including wealthy developed ones)...
I think the "American" part of it has more to do with the fact that Americans buy more groceries than people in other countries, not necessarily that they're lazy and don't want to walk for 15 minutes.
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Old 10-31-2017, 06:47 AM
 
6,800 posts, read 4,327,808 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shunketsu View Post
Typical American viewpoint...people walk more than 15 minutes with groceries in other countries (including wealthy developed ones)...
In urban areas thats true, of course its true in urban areas of the US as well. In equivalent suburban areas, its not so true.
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Old 11-01-2017, 11:52 AM
 
391 posts, read 239,308 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flyingscotsman View Post
Where i Live my walk score is Zero.

Nearest public transport is over two miles away with no sidewalk.

Which really is a shame, did not get my first car until I was in my 30's as I needed to at that point.

Highlands of Scotland had no need for a car.
Just curious, where in the Highlands did you live? I have been everywhere there and seems like the only place in the Highlands where one can just get by is Inverness or Fort William. Other towns are so small. Did you ride on the back of a goat or sheep. LOL. Seriously, you must love walking to have existed. By the way, I love the highlands.
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Old 11-01-2017, 11:56 AM
 
391 posts, read 239,308 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BC1960 View Post
In urban areas thats true, of course its true in urban areas of the US as well. In equivalent suburban areas, its not so true.
As one of those that walked from the grocers overseas, the difference is that Europeans usually pick up a few things at the grocers a couple of times a week. Here in the U.S. we tend to buy bags and bags of groceries and it is impossible to carry home no matter how far away one lives. Unfortunately, that might explain why we see an occasional Fresh Market or Harris Teeter cart in ditches. Sad.
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Old 11-01-2017, 12:01 PM
 
391 posts, read 239,308 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GoPhils View Post
I think the "American" part of it has more to do with the fact that Americans buy more groceries than people in other countries, not necessarily that they're lazy and don't want to walk for 15 minutes.
Sorry, I seem to have repeated what you said in this posting. You are absolutely correct about buying more groceries. However, the 15 minute thing depends on where one lives. In my community, lots of people walk over 15 minutes. The thing is, it is mostly for exercise or for fitbit gratification. We love our cars here in the U.S. and they do give us freed from fight crowds in the subways (tubes), buses, and other modes of transportation. Go to live in the good ole U.S. and be able to have a choice without paying a fortune to park in front of you own dwelling, etc.
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Old 11-03-2017, 04:01 PM
 
570 posts, read 539,721 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GoPhils View Post
How many people are going to walk 15 minutes to a grocery store for example? Good luck getting all your groceries back - but at least now many have the option for delivery.
I do! Where I lived in DC (Arlington, VA, to be exact), I could walk to both Harris Teeter and Costco. My big grocery shopping was at Costco, and for that, I bought a fold-up portable cart, like this one: https://s7d9.scene7.com/is/image/Bed...9816518078643p

Being in a walkable neighborhood is one of the most important things for me. I loathe having to drive places and being a slave to an automobile. I love the convenience of being able to walk places, and also seeing people out and about in my neighborhood. And I love the neighborhood businesses where the people working there know my face, and we have a common interest in our community.

When I lived in Arlington, I had a car but I used it so little that my battery would die. So I finally got rid of the car. For what was not available in my neighborhood, a Metro station was nearby to get me to other parts of the city. And I used Zipcar if I needed to go someone not on the Metro line. And for trips out of town, I could walk to a car rental place. All my needs were covered. Owning a car was a nuisance.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Laowai View Post
Helpful walkability analyses: https://www.walkscore.com/
Thank you for this. My old neighborhood in Arlington, VA, gets a score of 78. Where I live now in San Diego it's 89. I imagine one day I might be back in Charlotte and I hope there are abundant walkable communities by then. I've attached here the 30 most walkable neighborhoods in Charlotte according to this website.
Attached Thumbnails
Walkability in the Charlotte area.-30-most-walkable-charlotte-neighborhoods.jpg  

Last edited by brichard; 11-03-2017 at 04:29 PM..
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Old 11-04-2017, 09:55 PM
 
Location: Charlotte
645 posts, read 752,748 times
Reputation: 664
Many CHARLOTTE neighborhoods (not Mooresville Huntersville, Davidson,or Cornelius) built before 1975 don't have sidewalks. This is tremendous hindrance to walkability.

Some folks need to get out more.
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