U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > North Carolina > Charlotte
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 01-22-2018, 06:57 PM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
940 posts, read 503,483 times
Reputation: 372

Advertisements

@Vatnos post is quality. I second that. Didnt even think of the Hillsborough St neighborhood being more of a comparison to South End. Just maybe in a funkier way because obviously the college vibe and influence. More interesting but less stuff then South End for sure.
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-22-2018, 07:01 PM
 
1,211 posts, read 2,309,067 times
Reputation: 642
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbancharlotte View Post
Population of Raleigh + Durham County + Chapel Hill
820,000

Population of Charlotte
850,000

So YES, I agree. Charlotte is "roughly" the same size as Raleigh + a few neighbors.
Manipulating stats is silly man. Ignoring the fact that Raleigh is surrounded by continuous population on all sides is as well. City boundaries are used for political purposes... The second largest "Town" in the nation is West Raleigh (Cary), so stop.

If I went by your measurements, Charlotte is larger than Atlanta.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-22-2018, 07:07 PM
 
6,272 posts, read 10,021,726 times
Reputation: 4724
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vatnos View Post
Are there other areas? I don't actually know.
Elizabeth, Midtown, Plaza Midwood (smaller version of Hillsborough Street), Dilworth, Myers Park, Madison Park, Cotswold (think Cameron Village), South Park (larger version of North Hills), Ballantyne (larger version of Brier Creek), Ayrsley....

The best way that I can describe Charlotte is this: Pretend that Raleigh, Cary, and Durham were all one city. Place a larger downtown in the middle, and wrap I-540 around it all. That's Charlotte in a nutshell.

There are large areas of Charlotte like the I-85 corridor that has the look, feel, and demographics of Durham (or south east Raleigh). Then there are parts of Charlotte that feel like Cary (Ballantyne). Charlotte has many of the same parts as the Triangle. In Charlotte though, those parts are located within one city.

Triangle residents tend to travel from Raleigh to Chapel Hill to experience different vibes. In Charlotte, people travel between South End and Plaza Midwood (4 miles) to experience different vibes. The closer proximity of "hot spots" in metro Charlotte gives Charlotte a more connected/cohesive feel. You feel like you're in a city with more action. That's what I've noticed when comparing the two areas.

Last edited by urbancharlotte; 01-22-2018 at 07:37 PM..
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-22-2018, 07:44 PM
 
1,211 posts, read 2,309,067 times
Reputation: 642
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbancharlotte View Post
Elizabeth, Midtown, Plaza Midwood (smaller version of Hillsborough Street), Dilworth, Myers Park, Madison Park, Cotswold (think Cameron Village), South Park (larger version of North Hills), Ballantyne (larger version of Brier Creek), Ayrsley....

The best way that I can describe Charlotte is this: Pretend that Raleigh, Cary, and Durham were all one city. Place a larger downtown in the middle, and wrap I-540 around it all. That's Charlotte in a nutshell.

There are large areas of Charlotte like the I-85 corridor that has the look, feel, and demographics of Durham (or south east Raleigh). Then there are parts of Charlotte that feel like Cary (Ballantyne). Charlotte has many of the same parts as the Triangle. In Charlotte though, those parts are located within one city.

Triangle residents tend to travel from Raleigh to Chapel Hill to experience different vibes. In Charlotte, people travel between South End and Plaza Midwood (4 miles) to experience different vibes. The closer proximity of "hot spots" in metro Charlotte gives Charlotte a more connected/cohesive feel. You feel like you're in a city with more action. That's what I've noticed when comparing the two areas.

More lies... So Raleigh doesn't have different vibes within it's boundaries? Most mid-size cities have various cultures. Why do you slam Raleigh consistently? Do you enjoy Charlotte?
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-23-2018, 09:14 AM
 
185 posts, read 103,812 times
Reputation: 182
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trent Y View Post
@Vatnos post is quality. I second that. Didnt even think of the Hillsborough St neighborhood being more of a comparison to South End. Just maybe in a funkier way because obviously the college vibe and influence. More interesting but less stuff then South End for sure.
Nah, Raleigh doesn't have any transit-based neighborhood like South End just yet, Hillsborough has historical landmarks and considerations that will largely keep Hillsborough Street from receiving stupidly huge housing and office developments--that's a good thing. I say this even though most of the current development near Downtown Raleigh is actually on Hillsborough, 701H, 400H, 301H, One and Two Glenwood, so many housing projects completed or just starting, not to mention the street improvement project will wrap up next year.

The thing is Hillsborough St is a transitional street so all the cool stuff is also apart of other neighborhoods. Is Trophy Brewing considered Hillsborough St Neighborhood or Glenwood South or Boylan or Warehouse? Where does the Hillsborough St Neighborhood end exactly? At Glenwood or all the way to Downtown? What is the backbone of Hillsborough St? Just off Glenwood or is the second roundabout where the Green Monkey is? Is the NCSU portion included? It's not as easy to point and say what's Hillsborough like with Five Point. Hillsborough is also restricted at what you can build since they're many historic landmarks like the St. Mary School.

In the near future Raleigh could have at least two transit-based neighborhoods: The Southern Gateway and New Bern. Both are slated for Phase 1 Bus Rapid Transit, they're next to Downtown Raleigh, low density of historic properties, and developers are already buying up lots in anticipation. Alamo Drafthouse will open soon on New Bern--so you know that area will be gentrified fast.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-23-2018, 09:17 AM
 
185 posts, read 103,812 times
Reputation: 182
Quote:
Originally Posted by metro.m View Post
More lies... So Raleigh doesn't have different vibes within it's boundaries? Most mid-size cities have various cultures. Why do you slam Raleigh consistently? Do you enjoy Charlotte?

Apparently Oakwood/Mordecai, Five Points, and Glenwood South have all the same 'vibe'. Haha. Someone please tell me where all the divvy dance-bars are on Oakwood! I'm missing out!

Last edited by raleighsocial; 01-23-2018 at 10:05 AM..
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-23-2018, 11:33 AM
 
Location: Carrboro, NC
1,461 posts, read 1,445,249 times
Reputation: 1878
Quote:
Originally Posted by raleighsocial View Post
Nah, Raleigh doesn't have any transit-based neighborhood like South End just yet, Hillsborough has historical landmarks and considerations that will largely keep Hillsborough Street from receiving stupidly huge housing and office developments--that's a good thing. I say this even though most of the current development near Downtown Raleigh is actually on Hillsborough, 701H, 400H, 301H, One and Two Glenwood, so many housing projects completed or just starting, not to mention the street improvement project will wrap up next year.
I really do disagree with this. Hillsborough has the best transit communication in the city, because in addition to CAT, there's the Wolfline, which serves the NCSU area. It is also on the corridor that will eventually--even if it takes a long time, inevitably, host Raleigh's first light rail.

For better or worse you're also mistaken about the stupidly huge housing/office developments. There's an $11 million project that will overturn some neighborhoods and connect Hillsborough to Cameron Village along the Enterprise Street area.

Quote:
Originally Posted by urbancharlotte
Elizabeth, Midtown, Plaza Midwood (smaller version of Hillsborough Street), Dilworth, Myers Park, Madison Park, Cotswold (think Cameron Village), South Park (larger version of North Hills), Ballantyne (larger version of Brier Creek), Ayrsley....
I meant urban ones. I'm not talking about malls. Did you see me listing Cameron Village or North Hills? Plaza Midwood is a good example though... I had been down Central Avenue but didn't know the name of the place.

Quote:
Originally Posted by urbancharlotte
The best way that I can describe Charlotte is this: Pretend that Raleigh, Cary, and Durham were all one city. Place a larger downtown in the middle, and wrap I-540 around it all. That's Charlotte in a nutshell.
No, it isn't. Between Chapel Hill, Durham, and Raleigh there is much more. However, despite their proximity the three cities are not well connected by transit yet. The Triangle is very car-dependent, just like Charlotte's greater metro area. Nobody spends an afternoon hopping between things in multiple downtowns because that's an hour of driving back and forth.

So I think it's more suitable to compare Raleigh by itself, as the biggest of the three, with Charlotte. And I'd say Raleigh alone is a pretty 1-to-1 comparison. Charlotte has tall buildings and a larger population in its downtown of course, but the amount of urban retail space with local establishments in it is similar between the two cities. Charlotte's is more concentrated in its urban spokes, while Raleigh's urban spokes are a bit further behind, but its downtown has more. It's a tradeoff.

Last edited by Vatnos; 01-23-2018 at 11:50 AM..
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-23-2018, 12:50 PM
 
6,272 posts, read 10,021,726 times
Reputation: 4724
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vatnos View Post
No, it isn't.
YES it is! And before you attempt to argue again, look up the visitor spending of Meck county vs the visitor spending of Wake + Durham + Orange counties combined. That comparison alone will probably shock you...

I understand that you're proud of Raleigh. However, I'd NEVER call Charlotte a 1 to 1 comparison to a city with 2.5 times more visitor spending. You may want it to be a 1/1 deal, but I can show you numbers from both chamber of commerces that would make your arguments look quite silly. I'd rather not do that because lately you've been one of the more sensible posters from your area.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-23-2018, 01:01 PM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
940 posts, read 503,483 times
Reputation: 372
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbancharlotte View Post
YES it is! And before you attempt to argue again, look up the visitor spending of Meck county vs the visitor spending of Wake + Durham + Orange counties combined. That comparison alone will probably shock you...

I understand that you're proud of Raleigh. However, I'd NEVER call Charlotte a 1 to 1 comparison to a city with 2.5 times more visitor spending.
Well i think the point was you were talking about and comparing Charlottes neighborhoods as being an equal in culture to Raleigh, Durham, and Chapel Hill. Not to mention all of the other great towns in the Triangle. THAT was laughable. But if you want to do the typical statistics of numbers for population and GDP or whatever else it is you guys love stats about, i dont think anyone is arguing that Charlotte in most metrics is roughly double the size of Raleigh alone. Doesnt mean everything is automatically better though or certain areas and pockets cant be compared. If more people visit and spend money in Charlotte, that doesnt mean "X Charlotte neighborhood cant be related to Y Raleigh neighborhood."
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-23-2018, 01:12 PM
 
6,272 posts, read 10,021,726 times
Reputation: 4724
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trent Y View Post
If more people visit and spend money in Charlotte, that doesnt mean "X Charlotte neighborhood cant be related to Y Raleigh neighborhood."
If more people visit and spend money in Atlanta/New Orleans, that doesnt mean "X Atlanta/New Orleans neighborhood cant be related to Y Charlotte neighborhood."

Sounds silly when we apply your logic to cities with stronger visitor spending than Charlotte doesn't it?
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > North Carolina > Charlotte
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top