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Old 01-24-2018, 11:34 PM
 
Location: charlotte
291 posts, read 151,766 times
Reputation: 242

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The city is stating that full benefit of the gold line will not be recognized until it expands to biddleville to the west and continues toward the old eastland mall site. The 3 miles from
Uptown to Presbyterian hospital is far too early to judge this line. I think they envision that it could be a commuter line for some workers. If you recall the development in south end did not start off like gangbusters. It started slow and built momentum gradually after the blue line was built. So, I believe they think that it may generate some economic development. The developer that has bought land in Elizabeth realizes this and is simply waiting for the line to expand before he moves forward.
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Old 01-25-2018, 08:57 AM
NDL NDL started this thread
 
Location: Gaston County
3,128 posts, read 3,610,899 times
Reputation: 2048
Quote:
Originally Posted by The QC View Post
The city is stating that full benefit of the gold line will not be recognized until it expands to biddleville to the west and continues toward the old eastland mall site. The 3 miles from
Uptown to Presbyterian hospital is far too early to judge this line. I think they envision that it could be a commuter line for some workers. If you recall the development in south end did not start off like gangbusters. It started slow and built momentum gradually after the blue line was built. So, I believe they think that it may generate some economic development. The developer that has bought land in Elizabeth realizes this and is simply waiting for the line to expand before he moves forward.
Yes...I agree with you on Biddleville, and if and when the streetcar ties into the Blue Line, things should perk up. For me to comment further is silly, as I don't know who owns what on Elizabeth Ave.
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Old 01-25-2018, 12:30 PM
 
Location: North Carolina
430 posts, read 244,194 times
Reputation: 653
Quote:
Originally Posted by The QC View Post
The city is stating that full benefit of the gold line will not be recognized until it expands to biddleville to the west and continues toward the old eastland mall site. The 3 miles from
Uptown to Presbyterian hospital is far too early to judge this line. I think they envision that it could be a commuter line for some workers. If you recall the development in south end did not start off like gangbusters. It started slow and built momentum gradually after the blue line was built. So, I believe they think that it may generate some economic development. The developer that has bought land in Elizabeth realizes this and is simply waiting for the line to expand before he moves forward.
I think it will take a little while for the entire rail transit system to serve as an effective commuter option. I don't think we'll see it start to really take off for at least another 15 years or so. Ridership is currently lower now than it was in 2008, and right now, it just isn't widespread enough for a lot of people to start using it as an alternative to driving, plus it seems that public transit as a whole still carries a bit of a negative stigma. Once the Blue and Gold Line expansions open though, it will have a larger pool of commuters to draw from, and the Silver and Red Lines will only serve to expand that even more. Furthermore, as the next generation grows up around the light rail and street car, it will seem just as natural to them as the current road system does to us, and given the growth of ride-sharing services like Uber and Lyft, they will hopefully have a willingness to use it as a regular means of transportation.
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Old 01-25-2018, 06:27 PM
 
Location: charlotte
291 posts, read 151,766 times
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Since I live right on the blue line, I see the trains running when I am walking the dogs and I ride it very frequently myself. During rush hour and heading south from uptown, the trains are packed so much there is hardly any standing room. Also, the blue line is only 10 miles long. It ranks 12 th in US among light rail lines for boardings per mile. I expect the blue line north to have more ridership than the south. With 20 miles of line, I expect the numbers to go up dramatically. There is no doubt that as connectivity increases then ridership increases. As more lines are added, ridership will continue to expand exponentially. The same can be said for interstate travel. When 485 was built, traffic increased on 77.
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Old 01-25-2018, 06:29 PM
 
Location: charlotte
291 posts, read 151,766 times
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Of course ridership is high into uptown to avoid the high parking fees among uptown workers
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Old 01-26-2018, 08:14 AM
 
376 posts, read 223,932 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The QC View Post
Of course ridership is high into uptown to avoid the high parking fees among uptown workers
Smart, but haven't media reports suggested a good chunk of Blue line users skip out on the ole supposed-to-pay element? In other words, taxpayers paying for abusers' commutes. Not expecting you to answer this question (others may know), but what % of Blue line riders regularly pay?
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Old 01-26-2018, 04:11 PM
 
Location: North Carolina
430 posts, read 244,194 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Laowai View Post
Smart, but haven't media reports suggested a good chunk of Blue line users skip out on the ole supposed-to-pay element? In other words, taxpayers paying for abusers' commutes. Not expecting you to answer this question (others may know), but what % of Blue line riders regularly pay?
I thought I heard somewhat recently that CATS was cracking down on this. Maybe it hasn't been as effective as hoped?
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Old 01-26-2018, 04:17 PM
 
6,270 posts, read 9,993,341 times
Reputation: 4723
Quote:
Originally Posted by Laowai View Post
Smart, but haven't media reports suggested a good chunk of Blue line users skip out on the ole supposed-to-pay element? In other words, taxpayers paying for abusers' commutes. Not expecting you to answer this question (others may know), but what % of Blue line riders regularly pay?
I have a solution. 1.5 cent transit tax; fare-free system. Problem solved...
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Old 01-26-2018, 05:02 PM
 
Location: Washington DC
3,742 posts, read 3,263,751 times
Reputation: 2645
Quote:
Originally Posted by nicholas_n View Post
I thought I heard somewhat recently that CATS was cracking down on this. Maybe it hasn't been as effective as hoped?

People who donít pay the light rail I imagine are lower income folks who are most likely transferring or going to transfer.


I wonder if the media is just way overhyping though. The amount of people fare dodging to get from Arrowood to ScaleyBark are probably negligible to warrant any major changes and a waste of money.


Itís hard for me to feel sympathy over ď light rail commuter abusersĒ when literally there are meltdowns over toll roads. Although the integrity part is very bothersome
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Old 01-31-2018, 12:11 PM
 
Location: charlotte
291 posts, read 151,766 times
Reputation: 242
I have seen the CATS people do random checks for tickets. If caught without a transit ticket, the abuser is removed from the train and given a citation. The reality is there is no other way to monitor this on light rail systems. Subway systems are under ground and they can better deter abusers. But light rail is cheaper to build and operate. This is why Denver has 8 light rail lines with plans to build more. Seattle is also planning a $50 billion expansion of its light rail system. But they have no better method of finding abusers than Charlotte. Charlotte would do well to find a way to fund and build more lines than it’s proposed 3 lines. Denver is 2.8 million metro population compared to Charlotte’s 2.5 million but, Denver plans a much larger system. Charlotte should do the same. Traffic congestion is not too bad here now but, congestion will continue to increase as the population increases to 5 million in 40 years.
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