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Old 03-25-2008, 09:38 PM
 
Location: Union County
5,702 posts, read 8,145,818 times
Reputation: 4708

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So there I was sitting innocently at work - reading forums and it hit me. <BANG> What is the future of Charlotte? Well, let me tell you...

First of all - why am I reading forums at work? People get fired for that stuff! Secondly, the real answer is - hell, I don't know. However, starting a thread just to say I don't know seemed so anticlimactic. So I figured I'd latch on to one critical input into the future of Charlotte - the kids. The next generation certainly qualifies as "the future".

So, what's the dynamic right now... checklist:

- Great place <check>
- Word is out everywhere that Charlotte rocks <check>
- Continued massive influx of transplants <check>
- Massive increase in education jobs related to servicing these transplants <check>
- Jobs being filled by transplants <check>
- Kids being educated by transplants <ch...

Wait a second - I'm not really certain here... I mean I know that transplants are taking many teaching positions. I don't really know about the administration jobs - who I imagine manage the curriculum and program overall. What if transplants start to become significant in those positions? What impact will that have on the age old local v. transplant debate?
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Old 03-25-2008, 09:42 PM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 65,324,631 times
Reputation: 22274
Interesting.

It is my personal belief that keeping any organization vital depends on getting "new blood" into that system . . . so that things never stay at "status quo." It is good to have traditional ideas challenged - that is how growth takes place.

One of the fortunate aspects of having newcomers choose this region is that experienced teachers are part of that mix. This can only add to the expertise of the teaching pool.

I think it is a good thing . . . and am very excited about the interest we are seeing from teachers who wish to relocate to this area.
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Old 03-25-2008, 09:51 PM
 
Location: Wouldn't you like to know?
9,113 posts, read 15,311,701 times
Reputation: 3661
Mikey,

Good or bad, since visiting here 12 years ago, the Charlotte region has changed immensely.

As long as taxes/real estate are low compared to the major metro areas of the country, Charlotte will still be a heavily transplant dependent town.

It starts at the local levels and works its way up. Many transplants and non-natives are extremely active in their local town councils. IMO its a great thing. You get a diverse mix of people who add fresh and new ideas to an already established area w/its own great ideas...
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Old 03-25-2008, 09:59 PM
 
Location: The 12th State
22,974 posts, read 57,275,606 times
Reputation: 14874
As long as their is balance and willingness to listen from the natives and transplants it can be a good thing. However asking for too much change real fast will only cost money (taxes) and that effects everybody. For instance to natives a tax increase seems outrageous but if you are a newcomer after the new taxes have been effect and are moving from a higher tax area it looks like a great deal.

I dread at some point Denver, NC is going to become majority transplant town and work there way onto Lincoln County polictics and Denver will become incorporated and change what is already working good for that county.

Accept the things you cannot change, courage to change the things you can and wisdom to know the difference.
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Old 03-25-2008, 10:12 PM
 
Location: Union County, North Carolina
5,143 posts, read 6,355,794 times
Reputation: 4307
Quote:
Originally Posted by anifani821 View Post
Interesting.

It is my personal belief that keeping any organization vital depends on getting "new blood" into that system . . . so that things never stay at "status quo." It is good to have traditional ideas challenged - that is how growth takes place.

One of the fortunate aspects of having newcomers choose this region is that experienced teachers are part of that mix. This can only add to the expertise of the teaching pool.

I think it is a good thing . . . and am very excited about the interest we are seeing from teachers who wish to relocate to this area.
ani - The level of experience of new teachers is probably hindered by the differences in pension and benefit levels between the states they are coming from and here. It would be relatively easy to attract new graduates from from high-cost states, but experienced teachers from those places will never forgo their much greater salaries and more generous benefits to re-locate here -unless their spouses are making really big bucks. Teachers with 15-20 years experience bought their houses long ago, before the house price run-ups in the NE and CA ,so the appeal of lower housing prices is not much of a factor. NC would more likely see teachers from economically depressed areas like Detroit where the housing costs and declining enrollments factor into the equation.

MikeyKid - You're unlikely to see any mid-level administrators who would be willing to give up their $150,000 principal and $180,000 assistant superindendent jobs from where I came from, to move here. You'll see them down here, but as retirees only!
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Old 03-25-2008, 10:20 PM
 
Location: Union County, North Carolina
5,143 posts, read 6,355,794 times
Reputation: 4307
Quote:
Originally Posted by SunnyKayak View Post
As long as their is balance and willingness to listen from the natives and transplants it can be a good thing. However asking for too much change real fast will only cost money (taxes) and that effects everybody. For instance to natives a tax increase seems outrageous but if you are a newcomer after the new taxes have been effect and are moving from a higher tax area it looks like a great deal.

I dread at some point Denver, NC is going to become majority transplant town and work there way onto Lincoln County polictics and Denver will become incorporated and change what is already working good for that county.

Accept the things you cannot change, courage to change the things you can and wisdom to know the difference.
Sunny - It may already be too late! The Boston to Washington Megalopolis is slowly expanding to become The Boston to Atlanta Megalopolis. I would have thrown in a large Florida city, but with global warming, I wonder whether we'll have half that state here as a new "Halfback" wave of newcomers!
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Old 03-25-2008, 10:22 PM
 
Location: Wouldn't you like to know?
9,113 posts, read 15,311,701 times
Reputation: 3661
Quote:
Originally Posted by SunnyKayak View Post
. However asking for too much change real fast will only cost money (taxes) and that effects everybody. .
Sunny, its waaaay past that in Union County especially. Town councils and builders over the past several years created the mess that the county is currently in right now.

You have a rediculous amount of growth that occured over the short term w/a limited amount of commercial growth to help the tax base.

How do you realistically expect to pay for new schools and services to support the growth that the natives allowed? Sure, you can cut a little, but no where near what you need.

I feel sorry for the farmers in Eastern Union County who had nothing to do w/this, but what are you going to do?

I don't want my taxes to be in line w/Mecklenburg County, but I'm a realist and know we are coming to that in the next couple of years...

That's why people don't understand that I think its a great thing that growth has slowed tremendously....it gives the towns and counties time to "catch up" to what was previoulsy allowed...
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Old 03-26-2008, 07:39 AM
 
Location: CLT native
4,280 posts, read 9,833,306 times
Reputation: 2249
Quote:
Originally Posted by CouponJack View Post
Sunny, its waaaay past that in Union County especially. Town councils and builders over the past several years created the mess that the county is currently in right now.

You have a rediculous amount of growth that occured over the short term w/a limited amount of commercial growth to help the tax base.

How do you realistically expect to pay for new schools and services to support the growth that the natives allowed? Sure, you can cut a little, but no where near what you need.

I feel sorry for the farmers in Eastern Union County who had nothing to do w/this, but what are you going to do?

I don't want my taxes to be in line w/Mecklenburg County, but I'm a realist and know we are coming to that in the next couple of years...

That's why people don't understand that I think its a great thing that growth has slowed tremendously....it gives the towns and counties time to "catch up" to what was previoulsy allowed...
Bingo!
The developers should have had to pony up to widen some roads. It is ridiculous having large neighborhood after neighborhood off two lane roads.
I blame short sighted bureaucrats who approved all the building permits.
That aside, the growth alone, through influx of transplants being taxed should pay for the schools.
I live in Meck and my business in in Union.
I see Union taxes eclipsing Meck in the next few years to be completely honest. Union County's social services & schools are flooded with immigrant laborers and somebody will be paying for it.

Last edited by mullman; 03-26-2008 at 08:10 AM..
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Old 03-26-2008, 08:03 AM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 65,324,631 times
Reputation: 22274
Now here is something I do not understand, so if I have my facts mixed up, please enlighten me.

I am a native and I know the generally understood idea here is - "we don't care how you did it <fill in black w/ your former city>" But I don't feel that way. I think newcomers can bring new solutions. Maybe I feel that way b/c I lived elsewhere and saw how taxes worked in another municipality.

I think that developers here have been let off the hook waaaaaay too easily. In Kansas, developers had to submit plans that included such things as: greenway space (wh/ had to be fully developed b/f houses were sold); streets, sidewalks and guttering; strict rules w/ trees - how they were removed (if any were allowed to be removed) and planting new ones - so many were required per lot, along sidewalks, etc. In addition, amenities such as pools, parks off the greenways, etc. had to all be included in the plans and approved by city departments b/f moving forward w/ permits.

For the prices developers in UC were selling lots, they should have been able to provide those amenities, plain and simple.

So I think UC developers got a big ole free ride on a lot of things - and they should have had to ante up w/ a lot of $$$ as they developed land.

In re: to teachers: I am hearing teachers voicing concern about their pensions and what kind of shape they will be in down the road . . and those who have taught less than five years are making the switch w/o a lot of sweat. As far as longer term teachers, I think it all depends on the family situation - if husband is out of work, you move where H gets a job. So there are many factors that make up why we get new teachers here.

Oh - I would like to mention that at the time I lived in KS - the county where I lived - Johnson Co - was consistently in the top 10 fastest growing counties in the USA. So I think examining how they did things is very appropriate to our rapidly growing area.

.

Last edited by brokensky; 03-26-2008 at 08:05 AM.. Reason: typo; add info; change word
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Old 03-26-2008, 08:11 AM
 
Location: Drury Lane
820 posts, read 2,497,546 times
Reputation: 248
Check out today's Charlotte Observer, the article includes a map that forecasts all open space in Char-Meck will be developed by 2020.

Charlotte Observer | 03/26/2008 | In 25 years, county's<br> green could disappear (http://www.charlotte.com/109/story/552823.html - broken link)
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