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Old 05-28-2018, 08:26 PM
 
2,838 posts, read 4,155,052 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NDL View Post
Your post actually speaks to an issue that I have often thought about: why the headlong rush to grow Charlotte?

The upside of growth: the hope of upward mobility; diversity; better facilities.

The downside of growth: traffic; cost of living pushing upward; the loss of small town civility; greater strain on natural resources.

The degree to which Charlotte attracts world cultures sometimes surprises me, and a diverse population makes for a rich and fulfilling life.

Yet the costs associated with growth are undeniably high. I sometimes marvel at the degree to which Charlotte's suburbs will vie for newcomers, the consequence of which will (likely) be the permanent loss of Southern hospitality/virtues.
Bigger is not always better - especially when it comes to city size.

If you look at many of the very large cities in the nation the quality of life diminishes in many ways.
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Old 05-29-2018, 04:07 AM
 
520 posts, read 301,521 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NDL View Post
Your post actually speaks to an issue that I have often thought about: why the headlong rush to grow Charlotte?

....
supply and demand = investments & people flock for a better life running away from the high tax areas

Sad part is that same people who run away from high taxes will expect same benefits when they get here, which in turn rises taxes here as well...

Politicians keep borrowing/giving away our kids future now just to be elected, and guess what: entitlement runs stronger than ever (with no regards to kids future)
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Old 05-29-2018, 08:57 AM
 
43 posts, read 30,833 times
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Talk about killing the goose that laid the golden egg. Charlotte leaders have given away so much to attract more and more people. The way things are progressing eventually Charlotte will be like every other place people flee from.
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Old 05-29-2018, 09:40 AM
NDL
 
Location: Gaston County
3,184 posts, read 3,642,812 times
Reputation: 2084
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charlotteborn View Post
Bigger is not always better - especially when it comes to city size.

If you look at many of the very large cities in the nation the quality of life diminishes in many ways.
No doubt.

This is something that I posted before, a video of a police chase that took place in south Charlotte on a Tuesday afternoon, in the height of rush hour:

https://youtu.be/W8YFtEr2QDI

The officer had to have broken 70mph, easily.

***
Areas that experience high traffic not only steal away from productivity and family time, increased traffic often means a decrease in civility.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 28079 View Post
supply and demand = investments & people flock for a better life running away from the high tax areas
I understand what attracts people to Charlotte , but I don't understand why politicians are on board with this.

Increased tax revenue and an increase in power/influence? Yes, both are draws. Yet many politicians are generational in this region, and, depending on the area, many politicians are scrambling to resolve the issues associated with unchecked growth.

I don't have the time to provide links, but I have read articles of those who were involved in the planning of 485, and, at the local level the conclusion was that the road would soon be overwhelmed.

Land developer Smoky Bissell is quoted as having expressed concerns over the future availability of tap water to serve our growing region.

Some may construe my concerns as nothing more than "the sky is falling." What they don't realize is that I have seen this pattern before (as has been documented of certain areas within NY).
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Old 05-29-2018, 02:14 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
2,257 posts, read 2,247,088 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Charlotte485 View Post
I think people who say things like that have some idea that real American cities are basically modeled after the northeast. Like Long island type density and blocks. I wouldn’t ever want to live in Long Island looking places or all those hundreds of houses ringing downtown Philly.


The southern cities are obviously not like that and I’m sorta glad because I personally prefer the beauty of southern cities versus the block by block houses like in Philadelphia, Long Island, etc. Charlotte is a very beautiful city and it’s not wonder so many northern transplants flock to Charlotte and other southern cities: beyond low cost of living, the beauty of southern cities is itself desirable.

Atlanta's population has the same mentality as those in LA and NYC. I know, I lived the last 30 years in all three plus Boston and am a NC native.

Charlotte's annexation and love of building tall buildings has its residents and the Charlotte Observer referring to it as if it's a member of the America's big league of cities, which it isn't.

Until it is on the pulse on style and fashion and trends in step with the top 10 or so cities, it won't be

a true "big city" on the level of SF, NYC, LA Seattle, Chicago, D.C. Boston, Miami, etc.

Look no further than Charlotte's video bid for Amazon HQ2 which portrayed its view of hipster which was way off and shows an isolation from the real pulse of American cities.

It looked country, behind the curve, whatever, a far cry from the culture and scene being cultivated in the true international and national hot spots around the country.
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Old 05-29-2018, 02:30 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
2,257 posts, read 2,247,088 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NDL View Post
No doubt.

This is something that I posted before, a video of a police chase that took place in south Charlotte on a Tuesday afternoon, in the height of rush hour:

https://youtu.be/W8YFtEr2QDI

The officer had to have broken 70mph, easily.

***
Areas that experience high traffic not only steal away from productivity and family time, increased traffic often means a decrease in civility.



I understand what attracts people to Charlotte , but I don't understand why politicians are on board with this.

Increased tax revenue and an increase in power/influence? Yes, both are draws. Yet many politicians are generational in this region, and, depending on the area, many politicians are scrambling to resolve the issues associated with unchecked growth.

I don't have the time to provide links, but I have read articles of those who were involved in the planning of 485, and, at the local level the conclusion was that the road would soon be overwhelmed.

Land developer Smoky Bissell is quoted as having expressed concerns over the future availability of tap water to serve our growing region.

Some may construe my concerns as nothing more than "the sky is falling." What they don't realize is that I have seen this pattern before (as has been documented of certain areas within NY).
You are right about size decreasing quality of life. Everything is more of a hassle in big cities, and one of NC's best attributes is that it's a nice compromise of many things including relative ease and access to many things that aren't available to the middle class is larger cities.

What I love about that video is the high quality of that suburban road.

It has concrete curbs, something only the top tier states like Florida will spend the money on.

Atlanta has zero curbs of that caliber anywhere, even downtown all we get are slabs of granite as a crude curb which is awful on hubcaps and we have such poor drainage from absent or uncleaned drains that even our interstates have ponding water when it rains.

NC builds much better-quality roads.
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Old 05-29-2018, 03:06 PM
 
246 posts, read 123,284 times
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Charlotte is a "real major American city" whether you like it or not. It is one of the nation's largest banking centers, has one of the world's busiest airports, has its share of Fortune 500 companies, the largest energy company in the U.S. that s worldwide, and has only one larger city growing faster. That is Seattle. We are not in competition with other places. We need to grow and do our own thing. I can't think of any city in the north for which I wish to model, and like someone mentioned before that lived in Boston, I did too. Unlike most, it certainly wasn't my favorite place. As a matter of fact I have a condo there that will be on the market soon.

As a friend in NYC that lives in Charlotte mentioned before, he doesn't find NYC exciting as he did at one time. He always knew the festivals and annual events that happen there and the change is not that noticeable. Charlotte is changing weekly and he finds it exciting to be part of the growth. Charlotte is a major city and a really superior one whether that concept is acceptable or not. If it weren't, thousands and thousands wouldn't be moving here, they would be moving to Boston, Philadelphia, or Baltimore. We are all major cities in our own way, just overall, I believe we are the nicest. The only thing that we are missing is a river through the middle of town or a beach front.
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Old 05-29-2018, 05:24 PM
 
Location: Washington DC
3,784 posts, read 3,297,504 times
Reputation: 2665
Quote:
Originally Posted by architect77 View Post
Atlanta's population has the same mentality as those in LA and NYC. I know, I lived the last 30 years in all three plus Boston and am a NC native.

Charlotte's annexation and love of building tall buildings has its residents and the Charlotte Observer referring to it as if it's a member of the America's big league of cities, which it isn't.

Until it is on the pulse on style and fashion and trends in step with the top 10 or so cities, it won't be

a true "big city" on the level of SF, NYC, LA Seattle, Chicago, D.C. Boston, Miami, etc.

Look no further than Charlotte's video bid for Amazon HQ2 which portrayed its view of hipster which was way off and shows an isolation from the real pulse of American cities.

It looked country, behind the curve, whatever, a far cry from the culture and scene being cultivated in the true international and national hot spots around the country.

Atlanta has the same mentality of LA & NYC? Lol. You lost all credibility. It’s reallt no different than Charlotte at all. It’s a mirror image of each other except one is bigger....


And I don’t think anyone means CLT is a NYC. There’s lots of real American cities the size and as suburban as Charlotte. Pittsburgh, Portland, Austin, etc. I would put ATL, Minneapolis, Detroit, Houston, etc in the same category as the Charlottes, Orlando’s, and Portland’s in the US. Some are bigger some are smaller. But I don’t think there’s so much of a difference like “Minneapolis is just on another level to Pittsburgh”
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Old 05-29-2018, 06:52 PM
 
3,462 posts, read 3,147,769 times
Reputation: 3433
Quote:
Originally Posted by architect77 View Post
Atlanta's population has the same mentality as those in LA and NYC. I know, I lived the last 30 years in all three plus Boston and am a NC native.

Charlotte's annexation and love of building tall buildings has its residents and the Charlotte Observer referring to it as if it's a member of the America's big league of cities, which it isn't.

Until it is on the pulse on style and fashion and trends in step with the top 10 or so cities, it won't be

a true "big city" on the level of SF, NYC, LA Seattle, Chicago, D.C. Boston, Miami, etc.

Look no further than Charlotte's video bid for Amazon HQ2 which portrayed its view of hipster which was way off and shows an isolation from the real pulse of American cities.

It looked country, behind the curve, whatever, a far cry from the culture and scene being cultivated in the true international and national hot spots around the country.
Other than being a NC native, you've actually assimilated with the big boys quite, that is, a developed address-centric pretentiousness that makes me somebody....uh, no. I get it though, we need the big boys and don't think most southern cities will ever fit that mode no matter how much they boom. Recall how the Vanderbilts never excepted certain forms of attained wealth into their circle like the Woolworths (5&10)..the nerve of these Clampents. Surely the Walmarts would've been frowned upon as well.

But for what is worth, Charlotte and the vast majority of small to mid-size cities are the truest and quintessential representation of Americana.

Last edited by Big Aristotle; 05-29-2018 at 07:03 PM..
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Old 05-29-2018, 08:01 PM
 
3,215 posts, read 1,541,554 times
Reputation: 2332
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charlotte485 View Post
I’m not going to name streets and blocks and areas. I dislike Philadelphia. I don’t want to know philadelphia that well but it’s very clear when you go there, it’s block after block after block of homes surrounding the place with big skyscrapers....
You can say it.... You do not like row-hosing that is like solid blocks of a wall of many times plain wall brick homes for endless blocks unless homes were lost or other types of buildings are there.

You will get a scarlet letter as a Philly hater. Doesn't take much. Center City Philly has town squares part of the grid, that its original founder William Penn designed. The squares were not followed in the rest of the city as it evolved after William Pens day. Philly certainly has some very large parks. But many people want more green in front or backs of homes and may prefer unattached even if close-knit urban.

Just as some say they hate suburban.... why is it then worst to say you dislike very tight urban like row-housing as a example in Philly. There are other areas of Philly you would like. Its farther North Northwest side has areas like homes in a forest setting and much of suburban Philly that can be very green..

You clearly have a right to opinion and saying ringing downtown Philly does not need being called out for a error as Philly happens to have the Delaware river to its cores east. Your point was the dense style of attached housing is not your cup of tea ....
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