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Old 06-06-2018, 10:41 AM
 
426 posts, read 505,934 times
Reputation: 375

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Charlotte485 View Post
That’s sad those posters have such low aspirations to be a giant sprawling suburb. But to each his own.
Most them already live in one, agreed, though that criterion doesn't equate to the specific aspirations outlined, with C-D threads of hope to back them up.

Last edited by gold15; 06-06-2018 at 10:58 AM..
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Old 06-06-2018, 11:38 AM
 
148 posts, read 193,588 times
Reputation: 237
I had a young Native New York City Client that had made the move to Charlotte. She had lived in Queens and worked in Manhattan and was twenty four years old. I ask her how was she adjusting? She said she loved Charlotte and glad she made the move no plans of going back to New York to live. Her reason for loving Charlotte? "because it is a car city, unlike catching the subway after work, now I get in my car and I have choices of where I want to go". She is not the only New Yorker I've met that left the city seeking urban sprawl instead of urban density. So as stated above different strokes for different folks.
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Old 06-06-2018, 11:59 AM
 
246 posts, read 124,148 times
Reputation: 212
Quote:
Originally Posted by crider View Post
I had a young Native New York City Client that had made the move to Charlotte. She had lived in Queens and worked in Manhattan and was twenty four years old. I ask her how was she adjusting? She said she loved Charlotte and glad she made the move no plans of going back to New York to live. Her reason for loving Charlotte? "because it is a car city, unlike catching the subway after work, now I get in my car and I have choices of where I want to go". She is not the only New Yorker I've met that left the city seeking urban sprawl instead of urban density. So as stated above different strokes for different folks.
I agree. I also lived in a mega city and had no car. If I needed one for a special trip or a weekend get away, I rented one which was usually a pain in the neck. I had to depend on the underground or a bus which were both nightmares during rush hours. Transportation was not always dependable due to strikes, etc. I do not miss the hassles of depending on local transportation.

I now live in Charlotte and have found a new freedom in owning a car. I enjoy the option of living in close or in the suburbs as transportation is always available via my wonderful car. I have the freedom to go when I wish, where I wish and without a schedules if I wish.

Charlotte is large enough where one can live in a community without a car as I previously did at a much lower cost or live in an apartment or condo in uptown and still find hassle free parking or very inexpensive parking in comparison. As you said, "different strokes for different folks." Some people just refuse or are unable to change their routines and make a change. For me, I'll opt for my own transportation.
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Old 06-07-2018, 12:50 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
2,303 posts, read 2,257,584 times
Reputation: 2439
Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Aristotle View Post
Gotcha.
From a design, engineering, and urban planning perspective...

and land prices....

the costs and complexities that rise exponentially with building height are only justified when land prices or natural barriers limit what can be built. Charlotte, Atlanta, and most of America don't need very tall buildings.

Arguing that Charlotte does further proves misplaced priorities.

And all of the condescending tone regarding the rest of the state has been a proven failed policy so far (Apple, Amazon interest anyone?), and I think it would behoove Charlotte to embrace and tout it association with NC, the most talked about 21st century major player right up there with FL, TX, and NY/CA.

I probably would have made all the same choices as Hugh McColl because I too want NC to be in the big leagues.

I love Charlotte's tall buildings too.

I just wouldn't want to lose sight of why things are like are and go around arguing something different.


For better or worse, Everything about Charlotte and how it's perceived by it residents and the entire world were sent on a different trajectory by...


McColl's personal tastes and his jumping when the interstate banking laws changed to want to be the biggest bank in the country.

And everyone on here, me included, should be out living the supposed fantastic life happening in these cities.

But don't forget what's behind all of this.

Last edited by architect77; 06-07-2018 at 01:00 PM..
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Old 06-07-2018, 01:08 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
2,303 posts, read 2,257,584 times
Reputation: 2439
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Ever heard of Austin? https://www.bizjournals.com/austin/n...high-rise.html

But otherwise you have a point as banks in particular love building trophy towers.
Austin's distinctive, recognizable low-slung skyline (which I want Raleigh to hold on to) continued for decades...

until about 2-3 years ago with that one new addition that ruined the uniqueness and has ushered in several new very tall projects.

So using it as an example especially with the "ever heard" phrase which implies not knowing what's been going on for quite some time,

applies more to you, for comparing a city with a 2 year old new tall building with Charlotte whose headlines in the paper in late 80's read "Tower Wars" between banks.
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Old 06-07-2018, 02:20 PM
 
Location: charlotte
307 posts, read 160,603 times
Reputation: 251
Every time I read comments From Architect he seems to have a rare and very discriminating taste for Charlotte. But he is just an example that reads the newspaper on line from another city or lived here for 2-3 years and seems to know everything about Charlotte. But the truth is he knows very little.

The truth is N.C. always under estimates the future population of the CLT metro. The Charlotte MSA will be 3.5 million by 2035 and 3.8 million by 2040.

Another truth is that developers do not spend hundreds of millions to build buildings without demand. They want to stay in business.

A few years back when a major tenant was wanting to move to Charlotte they need a large amount of office space. The space did not exist in one building uptown so the tenant moved to Ballantine where the space did exist. This is why tall buildings exist inmost larger cities. Tenenats do not want their employees spread in five buildings if it can be avoided.
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Old 06-07-2018, 02:26 PM
 
Location: charlotte
307 posts, read 160,603 times
Reputation: 251
The Architect also thinks CLT promotes itself as a big city. Nothing could be further from the truth. The local newspaper and leadership I think are too quick to diminish Clt’s accomplishments. And you will never read in the local paper that CLT is Big city. It always refers to CLT as a medium sized city. Not the same can be said of Atlanta. When ATL was 2.5 million in the mid 1980s, the ATL Constitution referred to Atl as major city all of the time. It was the same size CLT is today.
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Old 06-07-2018, 02:36 PM
 
Location: charlotte
307 posts, read 160,603 times
Reputation: 251
The problem is the Architect does not know much history of ATL or CTL. I traveled frequently to ATL in the 1980s and 1990s. Architect sees ATL today. He does not see the ATL that I saw 30 years ago. He has a very limited view of things that only spans a few years. Back in the 1980s ATL had one bar district .... Buckhead. CLT today has 5-6 bar districts. In 1996, ATL hosted the summer olympics. There was very little to do in ATL and ATL took a major hit in newspapers across the world for lack of entertainment. This spurred the movement that resulted in the creation of World of Coke , CNN Center and later the Ga Aquarium. And to be honest CLT has many more museums uptown today than ATL had when it was the size of CLT.
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Old 06-07-2018, 03:00 PM
 
Location: charlotte
307 posts, read 160,603 times
Reputation: 251
And when speaking of religion, I think Architect’s view is way over blown. He says CLT is a religious city. Really? CLT is a city of transplants. I gues all the people moving here from NYC and other places are all religious too.

ATL and CLT are both southern cities. They are very similar. I know cause I spent a lot of time in ATL. ATL is just a bigger version. They both have similar fabric, densities, religious identity, transportation systems etc. ATL is just bigger with more transplants since it has been a boom town longer.

I cannot tell any difference to speak of between 1985 ATL and CLT today. CLT has become ATL. I used to enjoy ATL when I was there on so many occasions. I considered moving to ATL. I never did. Today CLT is very similar to the ATL that I frequently visited.

In addition most cities in the US identify as having religious roots. This country was founded on religious roots. I bet there is not but 5-6 percentage points difference among cities in US as to the percentage that admit they believe in God. I would bet that over 50 percent of people in US admit to believing in God.

I can go 30 miles out of Chicago and hear religious channels on the radio. I can see billboards about God inNYC. All cities have religious people and agnostics . My three best friends are agnostic. I believe in God but I am not a fanatic. I have never had anyone pushing religion on me. Each to his own belief.
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Old 06-07-2018, 03:00 PM
 
570 posts, read 544,892 times
Reputation: 551
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tarheelhombre View Post
Who wants to be like Atlanta? Aim higher. At least covet DC, Minneapolis, Austin, Seattle, or Denver, if you must seek to emulate anywhere.
Exactly.
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