U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > North Carolina > Charlotte
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 06-23-2018, 11:32 AM
 
1 posts, read 957 times
Reputation: 10

Advertisements

I'm totally frustrated with looking for a home ( new construction) with no HOA!! They do exist, but its rare. In addition to that challenge, its finding a home we like with curb appeal. They claim there's an inventory problem and I tend to disagree with that. There's plenty of houses being built and sold. The problem is finding a home that we like and that meets ours requirements.I do realize there's going to be some compromise and I'm prepare for that.However, practically everyone I talk to who has a HOA is not happy with it. And ranch style homes are practically non existent unless you can find a piece of property to build on yourself. Any suggestions?

 
Old 06-23-2018, 12:22 PM
 
6,800 posts, read 4,426,379 times
Reputation: 5345
Yeah, anything built in a subdivision on the past 20 years or so will have some type of HOA, as one is required to own things like stormwater detention ponds, entrance signs, etc. That said, many of those HOA's do nothing but own those facilities, and exercise no control over fencing, house colors, what the yard looks like, etc. so its probably worthwhile to examine the HOA docs if you find something you like.

Your best bet, imo, is to drop the new build requirement and find an older ranch in a pre-HOA neighborhood. You can renovate it to suit your style/needs.
 
Old 06-23-2018, 12:33 PM
 
1,466 posts, read 1,009,776 times
Reputation: 1689
You could purchase a renovated ranch in an established community with no HOA or renovate one yourself. New builds almost all have HOA's and ranch homes are not common for new construction.
 
Old 06-23-2018, 01:56 PM
 
5,882 posts, read 7,737,086 times
Reputation: 3377
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlottesn View Post
I'm totally frustrated with looking for a home ( new construction) with no HOA!! They do exist, but its rare. In addition to that challenge, its finding a home we like with curb appeal. They claim there's an inventory problem and I tend to disagree with that. There's plenty of houses being built and sold. The problem is finding a home that we like and that meets ours requirements.I do realize there's going to be some compromise and I'm prepare for that.However, practically everyone I talk to who has a HOA is not happy with it. And ranch style homes are practically non existent unless you can find a piece of property to build on yourself. Any suggestions?
Budget? Any particular area you are focusing on? Commute? How do you define "curb appeal"?

I think what you describe does exist, but yes, it's rare.

Here are a few that appear to meet those criteria (of varying price ranges) after doing a very quick search:

318 Julia Ave, Belmont
7115 McIlwaine Rd, Huntersville
12406 Bronx Dr, Huntersville
705 Groff St., Concord
156 Robbins St., Concord
2573 Hemphill St, Charlotte
6901 Plott Rd, Charlotte
2151 Seaside Rd, York
 
Old 06-24-2018, 08:55 AM
 
246 posts, read 123,284 times
Reputation: 212
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlottesn View Post
I'm totally frustrated with looking for a home ( new construction) with no HOA!! They do exist, but its rare. In addition to that challenge, its finding a home we like with curb appeal. They claim there's an inventory problem and I tend to disagree with that. There's plenty of houses being built and sold. The problem is finding a home that we like and that meets ours requirements.I do realize there's going to be some compromise and I'm prepare for that.However, practically everyone I talk to who has a HOA is not happy with it. And ranch style homes are practically non existent unless you can find a piece of property to build on yourself. Any suggestions?
I find that HOAs are particularly useful in close communities. We have 50 percent renters and out of state people. Most of these people are not concerned with the general appeal of the community and do minimal to participate in keeping up the value and integrity of the area. I have found out in my neighborhood that is highly international that people have different ideas of how a home should be set up. For example, the house house across from me that houses employees from Asian restaurant though that beach towels were acceptable for curtains and that the rails on their porch were acceptable for hanging out clothes. Many people let their animals crap on the yards of others, and things that shouldn't happen/occur, do. At least with a good HOA, these eyesores and problems can be resolved. Remember, it is the homeowner that puts people in HOA offices so if you are concerned with the HOA, get on the board. If I didn't live in a neighborhood where houses were so close and neighbors weren't so diverse, I wouldn't want an HOA either. But it is what it is.
I do find that those that hate or oppose HOAs are the ones that do not wish to maintain their lawns or obey even the most basic common sense good neighbor practices.
 
Old 06-24-2018, 12:25 PM
 
2,103 posts, read 3,583,787 times
Reputation: 2061
Unless one lives far away from other neighbors, I would only consider a strong HOA to enforce civility.

Impossible to get a decent value when selling a clean and updated house that has close by hillbilly neighbors.
Not to mention daily sore eye...




 
Old 06-25-2018, 12:03 PM
 
2,824 posts, read 3,347,681 times
Reputation: 3030
HOAs are not government and they don't "enforce civility". There is no empirical evidence to suggest that HOAs "preserve" or "enhance" value for homeowners. They are used to create and enhance value for the developers, HOA attorneys, and management companies not homeowners. If anything they are the biggest threat to the homeowners and there are plenty of homeowners who had their home and all the equity in the home taken away by the HOA and its vendors. What you think you like is a bully capable of divesting people of their homes because you don't like something. Not sure you would like that when you have no right to vote, no right to run for office, and no protection from abuse.
 
Old 06-25-2018, 08:45 PM
 
Location: Chapelboro
10,672 posts, read 11,296,076 times
Reputation: 8525
North Carolina has a regulation that requires developments (since the 90s) of a certain size (its a small number, I think just 20 homes) to have HOAs, so if you want a new construction ranch with no HOA you will have to look in very small neighborhoods or at infillls. Another thought is to check out Fort Mill. Not sure of SC regulations.
 
Old 06-26-2018, 12:27 AM
 
Location: Ohio
69 posts, read 32,625 times
Reputation: 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by IC_deLight View Post
HOAs are not government and they don't "enforce civility". There is no empirical evidence to suggest that HOAs "preserve" or "enhance" value for homeowners. They are used to create and enhance value for the developers, HOA attorneys, and management companies not homeowners. If anything they are the biggest threat to the homeowners and there are plenty of homeowners who had their home and all the equity in the home taken away by the HOA and its vendors. What you think you like is a bully capable of divesting people of their homes because you don't like something. Not sure you would like that when you have no right to vote, no right to run for office, and no protection from abuse.
Agreed. I prefer to err on the side of caution and risk the random person who abuses their freedom than to live with a HOA hovering over my head.

Yeah, so why not do a custom build or buy an older home? Newer homes tend to have less land, no trees, and poor soil. They're also not immune to problems. (Have it independently inspected, even if it's brand new!) We did look into a new rancher that was almost completed, but HOA, and the work didn't seem all that great.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Arthur McAlister
I do find that those that hate or oppose HOAs are the ones that do not wish to maintain their lawns or obey even the most basic common sense good neighbor practices.
I almost agreed with Arthur until I read that last line. I found a rancher built in 2000 in a non-HOA neighborhood and there are no problems that I know of. Of course, if I had strong opinions about what others should and should not do and I wanted to control them, I might have an issue and want to start a HOA. But I prefer freedom and flexibility so people can enjoy their homes and lives. I don't want to stand in the way of that let alone pay monthly for someone else to do it.

Keep looking for the non-HOA deal! Or be careful to check on what their scope is. Expenses could increase down the road...for the road even.
 
Old 06-26-2018, 09:48 AM
 
5,882 posts, read 7,737,086 times
Reputation: 3377
Quote:
Originally Posted by IC_deLight View Post
HOAs are not government and they don't "enforce civility". There is no empirical evidence to suggest that HOAs "preserve" or "enhance" value for homeowners. They are used to create and enhance value for the developers, HOA attorneys, and management companies not homeowners. If anything they are the biggest threat to the homeowners and there are plenty of homeowners who had their home and all the equity in the home taken away by the HOA and its vendors. What you think you like is a bully capable of divesting people of their homes because you don't like something. Not sure you would like that when you have no right to vote, no right to run for office, and no protection from abuse.
So it sounds like you have empirical evidence to suggest that HOA's DON'T preserve value?

Doing a quick search and along the lines of your post, it seems if that's true it's likely due to the HOA foreclosing, and the foreclosure selling for below market value and thus effecting the other homes in the neighborhood.

But for owners who are current on their mortgage, I would theorize that at least outside of Charlotte city limits with a few exceptions (such as Downtown Davidson or Matthews), neighborhoods with HOA's have appreciated faster than those that don't have HOA's. There are a lot of nice in-town neighborhoods without HOA's, but in the suburbs/exurbs if you find a neighborhood with no HOA chances are there will be a few houses that look like 28173's pictures.
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > North Carolina > Charlotte
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top