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Old 07-08-2008, 10:16 AM
 
569 posts, read 1,224,757 times
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I have several friends/family members that have recently graduated college. Maybe it is just me, but I gather that many of them have unrealistic salary/job expectations. I figured I would post this because I am tired of listening to recent grads compaining about not finding work or not making enough money in thier positions. I suppose in some ways they are not to blame, especially if they have really never held down a real job before. I know in some cases the reasons for this way of thinking is because for 4 years they have had college professors telling them when they graduated they were going to start out making high salaries because they had a degree. I'm sure many of them are now finding out a degree gets you a pat on the back along with a "great job kido, now start repaying me those student loans" Anyways I am not normally one for long post but my point is just because your a new grad does not mean you deserve a job (especially a high salary). You have to take the chip off your shoulder and ask yourself "what sets me apart from everyone?" "What do I bring in (other than a degree) that will benefit the employer?" In other words how can you justify your being hired to an employer? In not some but ALL CASES it is who you know that lands you a good job. LEVERAGE is also a big factor in earning ( I say earning because it is not just given to you) a good salary. When I say LEVERAGE I mean "what upper hand do you hold to demand a high salary from the employer?" Your LEVERAGE could be a specific talent you have that no one else can perform as well as you. The two factors (networking & leverage) are the two biggest things you can have on your side when looking for a job. My advise is take this to heart. Sometimes you just have to get your foot in the door and eat some crow for awhile before you start making demands. A good job/salary is not something that is DESERVED it is something that is EARNED. This post is not something that intends to offend or hurt anyones feeling out there. I only hope that it will make some people take a hard look at themselves in thier future job persuits....
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Old 07-08-2008, 10:38 AM
 
Location: Oz
329 posts, read 1,126,815 times
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I agree with what you are saying. The economy now is similar to when I graduated in 1990 - probably worse. I graduated with good grades (3.25) several internships and other relevant work experience during college related to my degree and great references - only to find it VERY difficult to find a job in my field - Advertising/Marketing.

At the time a lot of ad agencies were cutting back and people with experience were applying for the same jobs I was applying for - willing to take the same entry level pay just to get the job. The salary wasn't even that great - so for current graduates - with the exception of specific 'hot' fields expecting high salaries with in today's economy in my opinion is unrealistic.

Real life, business experience is most important - whether it is in your field or not is important - at least for the corporate world - at least in my opinion. I was so clueless on how corporate America worked and learning about that and how to network and how often times you take a job that isn't exactly what you want - maybe something you consider 'boring' or less than what you really want to do - just for the experience and to learn from others with more experience is essential.

What you do with this and how you use it to open more doors and advance is the key.
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Old 07-08-2008, 11:06 AM
 
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I agree with the second part of your post but not the first. A college degree gets you a heck of a lot more than just a pat on the back my friend. I graduated two years ago and when i was hunting down jobs, most in the corporate world won't even look at your resume if you don't have at least a two year, more often four year degree. Now, your field of study on the other hand, is not so important. I have a degree in sociology but ended up landing a job in sales and account management. It turned out ok, I like the job and the salary isn’t bad at all – I did work in a few jobs for my first year after college with laughable salaries, but I think that had more to do with the town I lived in at the time. But you are right in the fact that in most cases recent grads should expect to lay low for the first couple of years before expecting big raises and the company card. Which is the way it should be in my opinion. I read something by Suze Orman once (she’s obnoxious but I love her) where she was saying how when you’re fresh on the job market, your first year or two is all about making your boss look good, then you have some ground to stand on when you march in and demand a raise. Which is some good advice if you ask me.
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Old 07-08-2008, 11:23 AM
 
Location: Oz
329 posts, read 1,126,815 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jrnygrl View Post
I agree with the second part of your post but not the first. A college degree gets you a heck of a lot more than just a pat on the back my friend. I graduated two years ago and when i was hunting down jobs, most in the corporate world won't even look at your resume if you don't have at least a two year, more often four year degree. Now, your field of study on the other hand, is not so important. I have a degree in sociology but ended up landing a job in sales and account management. It turned out ok, I like the job and the salary isn’t bad at all – I did work in a few jobs for my first year after college with laughable salaries, but I think that had more to do with the town I lived in at the time. But you are right in the fact that in most cases recent grads should expect to lay low for the first couple of years before expecting big raises and the company card. Which is the way it should be in my opinion. I read something by Suze Orman once (she’s obnoxious but I love her) where she was saying how when you’re fresh on the job market, your first year or two is all about making your boss look good, then you have some ground to stand on when you march in and demand a raise. Which is some good advice if you ask me.
Yes, having a degree definitely makes a difference. There are a lot of people without a 2 or 4 year degree with great real life experience and a proven track record that could/would be a great for the position that are not even considered because a degree is required. I think the poster's point was more about the expectations of a great salary and guaranteeing a job out of college - but I could be wrong

Last edited by KansasChick; 07-08-2008 at 11:32 AM..
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Old 07-08-2008, 11:30 AM
 
33 posts, read 111,938 times
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I hear ya, a degree definitely isnít a guarantee of a good job, but Iíd say it gives you a definite advantage
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Old 07-08-2008, 11:35 AM
 
569 posts, read 1,224,757 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jrnygrl View Post
I agree with the second part of your post but not the first. A college degree gets you a heck of a lot more than just a pat on the back my friend. I graduated two years ago and when i was hunting down jobs, most in the corporate world won't even look at your resume if you don't have at least a two year, more often four year degree. Now, your field of study on the other hand, is not so important. I have a degree in sociology but ended up landing a job in sales and account management. It turned out ok, I like the job and the salary isnít bad at all Ė I did work in a few jobs for my first year after college with laughable salaries, but I think that had more to do with the town I lived in at the time. But you are right in the fact that in most cases recent grads should expect to lay low for the first couple of years before expecting big raises and the company card. Which is the way it should be in my opinion. I read something by Suze Orman once (sheís obnoxious but I love her) where she was saying how when youíre fresh on the job market, your first year or two is all about making your boss look good, then you have some ground to stand on when you march in and demand a raise. Which is some good advice if you ask me.
I see your point about the whole college degree thing. I did not mean to dis-credit having a degree. I know it helps more than hurts to have something. I myself do not have a degree (which is not something I am proud of because I'm working on getting one now). I do however work in corp-america right now. I have always made up for my lack of degree by either having good contacts or knowing what doors to knock on. Maybe it is the field I'm in (corporate sales) but I have always had the attitude of making my own raises and being numb to rejection. I just wish some of the recent grads out there would toughen up a little and quit having the attitude that the world owes them something. BTW I agree, Suzy Orman is obnoxious, but she is one smart cat.
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Old 07-08-2008, 11:37 AM
 
Location: Oz
329 posts, read 1,126,815 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jrnygrl View Post
I hear ya, a degree definitely isnít a guarantee of a good job, but Iíd say it gives you a definite advantage
Definitely! A degree opens doors to gaining necessary experience. Having realistic expectations of what type of job you will be getting can be tough though for recent grads.......... partially due to immaturity, lack of real world business experience and probably a little of the young - invinceable mentality. I would definitely encourage everyone to get some type of degree - or trade equivalent if you are in that type of field. Especially, when the economy is a little down.

I just know that I was definitely disillusioned on what the 'real' world was like out of college. Learned a lot from the experience and every job I have every had, even the ones that seem insignificant - that have helped me get me where I am today.
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Old 07-08-2008, 11:39 AM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC
624 posts, read 1,892,560 times
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I agree that a degree gives you a leg up on some of the competition, but nowadays, for the jobs that you may be expecting employers want so much more. As I believe the OP was eluding too, you need more than just a piece of paper that says you spent the last four years in a classroom.

The real value, and the real talking points that I found when I was interviewing in October '07 were the extras that you can place on your resume. What sort of leadership experience do you have? Did you take advantage of any internship opportunities.

If you didn't work directly in your field. Did you volunteer or help someone in your free time or did you spend it drinking the nights away. Expectations need to be realistic - Now more than ever with the current economy.
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Old 07-08-2008, 11:55 AM
 
569 posts, read 1,224,757 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MysteryMT View Post
I agree that a degree gives you a leg up on some of the competition, but nowadays, for the jobs that you may be expecting employers want so much more. As I believe the OP was eluding too, you need more than just a piece of paper that says you spent the last four years in a classroom.

The real value, and the real talking points that I found when I was interviewing in October '07 were the extras that you can place on your resume. What sort of leadership experience do you have? Did you take advantage of any internship opportunities.

If you didn't work directly in your field. Did you volunteer or help someone in your free time or did you spend it drinking the nights away. Expectations need to be realistic - Now more than ever with the current economy.

That is correct. That was one of the points I was getting at. As I said in an earlier post I do not have a degree currently. I actually dropped out of college to start my own business some years ago. Financially the business was not a success, but it taught me so many things I would not have learned in a classroom. It's funny because over the years whenever I've had to interview, the business I ran is still the first thing employers ask me about on my resume. Most employers are very interested to find out that I had started a business at such a young age. Looking back on it I have no regrets because it taught me perserverance and humility. These were not easy to learn. In my original post I was only trying to pass along to new grads in the real world something that took me years to learn, but I suppose only life can teach you that.
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Old 07-08-2008, 12:06 PM
 
Location: Huntersville, NC
15 posts, read 47,947 times
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I'm a graduate teaching assistant at the moment teaching a course in which we try to get sophomore/junior college students to start looking at different business majors and careers.. I'm constantly amazed at what they think a person can do or be straight out of college. I often get students expecting a marketing degree to earn them a management position straight out of college earning 6 figures. I've always wondered where they get the salary figures they come up with and why they don't realize that everyone has to start somewhere... and it's usually not at the top!
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