U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > North Carolina > Charlotte
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-13-2008, 02:59 PM
 
Location: Up above the world so high!
44,880 posts, read 56,395,569 times
Reputation: 37993

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by g1ennfa1th View Post
I know I am weeks behind on this. But I had to comment regarding the traditions of the south. In many parts of the south people will refer to themselves or others as "country" and be proud of that. My husband and I fall into this category as "country". I am a white woman and he is a black man. Many people from the north would automatically hear the word "country" and assume that to be a white person. Most people from the south regardless of race embrace the southern culture. Ex1: When my husbands cousin lived with us and I went into his room one day and saw his Phat Farm shoes lined up next to his snake skin cowboy boots. I know many people see these two diferent types of shoes and automatically stereotype/pre-judge them two diferent races of people. Yet they are owned by the same Southern "Country" Mississippi Black man. Ex2: A friend of mine is a white female with a license plate that says "Get'ur Done" and her sons father is Puerto Rican.

We in many parts of the south have come from diverse races and backgrounds and unified into more of the southern culture, regardless of skin color. Of course everyone sees skin color when they look at someone you can not help but to see that when you look at someone. Just like you notice their hair color and eye color as well. It is whether you use that as something to pre-judge that person or just notice it as their personal attributes and then get to know as a person.

This has been a great thread.

P.S. I live in and grew up in FLA, my husband in from Miss and I have family in GA and TN. We have considered moving to Charlotte.


Bravo!! What a great post! You have given valuable insight here
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-13-2008, 07:40 PM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC
7,042 posts, read 8,851,069 times
Reputation: 2228
Lightbulb good post

Quote:
Originally Posted by anifani821 View Post
I decided to comment further on this, Palmetto. Cause what goes on - especially in smaller towns and communities - is a lot of socializing in homes, at someone's lake house . . . or gatherings at other organization's - such as Elks, Moose, American Legion and churches.

In small town America, this is probably pretty constant. In the South, there may be parties going on down at the lake - huge get togethers, even - big BBQs . . . or in someone's home . . . poker games, or people getting together to watch sports . . . etc.

The way I grew up, by Wed every week, whole groups of people would be figuring out "what is going on" the next weekend. Sometimes, a local event would be the start of the evening . . . and then progressive parties . . . moving from one person's house to another . . . or down at someone's lake house . . .

So it might be that everyone had tickets to a local minor league baseball game for ex . . . and we would then gather later at a restaurant or club (or private country club). . . or country/western dance floor . . . or to someone's lake house . . . But every single week, there was plenty of partying going on - especially if one had a wide group of friends. Plus, friends of friends would issue an invite . . .Maybe someone would put together a motorcyle rally up to Asheville or Boone, and those w/o cycles would meet up w/ the rest of the group at someone's house or at a restaurant/hotel . . . or maybe it was casino nite at the Elks . . . or a crafts show and potluck dinner to raise money for missionary work at one of the churches . . .such a huge variety of events . . . and meet-ups.

Plenty of stuff going on! In fact, it was just a matter of choosing what to participate in - and who had babysitters, LOL or what events you could take the kids to and have fun . . . and how much time one had . . .

But if you were not part of those groups (and as I said - I belonged to many informal groups of friends - some from work, some from the neighborhood, some from church, some from college, plus memberships in various organizations, etc) . . . well then, I guess you would be thinking - nothing going on in this two-horse town. Not true! But if you didn't get an invite or didn't have longtime associations w/ the people involved . . . well . . . guess you would be wondering why there is "nothing to do" here in the South.
Ani, I think that you have hit the proverbial nail on the head. Up north, there is not as much socializing as you describe; in fact, something like that would be a very rare event. If we were not working (it is quite common up north to have 2-3 jobs at one time), we might meet friends for a meal at a restaurant, go to our bowling/golf/sport leage(s), visit museums, zoos, waterfront, sporting event, broadway show, opera, etc. If you were lucky enough to have a friend with a lake house or boat, you might be invited once a season to their place. Mostly, the socializing involved is with your spouse or significant other or you attend events where others are. Rarely, or only for holidays, do you have people in your home. In fact, it is considered rude for people to come to your house without an expressed invitation and/or previous phone call. You definately do not speak to your neighbours or anyone else that you have not been formally introduced to as that could set you up to mugged or otherwise robbed.

Maybe the "lack of culture" phrase is in reference to the lack of activities that a community offers. For myself, I know that I would love to be able to visit a museum...the kind that takes a few weeks to go through and is fresh every time....or, go to a REAL baseball game....etc. As a single person, I do not have anyone to take with me to socialize...and, I am really not a very social kind of person anyway. Maybe we have hit on something here. If one is not a social kind of person that enjoys the socializing that Ani describes, and their community does not offer (for whatever reason) the kinds of activities that they are used to, maybe that is where they come up with the "No Culture" phrase.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-09-2010, 09:29 PM
 
37 posts, read 37,095 times
Reputation: 25
Now I know this thread is two years old but I've been considering moving to Charlotte so I've been reading various threads to get some insight from the people who actually live there.

Obviously I didn't read this entire thread so what I am going to write may have already been said. Now to answer the original post...

In my opinion, the reason why people are so concerned with diversity (myself included) is they don't want to feel isolated in a particular neighborhood. I'm an African American male in my late 20's with a wife and child and I currently live in CT. My wife and I are both professionals and consider ourselves middle class. Now, getting back to the question. Here in CT you would be very hard pressed to find diversity in the suburbs. I for one grew up in a suburban, all white, neighborhood. The issue is that you are always the odd ball and people will actually at times stop and stare as if they've never seen a brown face before. So many of us (middle class black people) have no problem living in an all white neighborhood so long as the neighborhood has no problem with us. There is also the issue of your child being the only black kid at his school, again, this is only an issue if he/she is subjected to racism because of being the only.

The bottom line is, when we see other African Americans in an upscale neighborhood we feel as though if these blacks live here comfortably there should be no issue with us living here. Most people just want to be accepted. I dont care what color the people are in my neighborhood as long as they treat me and my family with respect. I know what its like to be "the only" and subjected to ridicule because of it and I like many others want to make sure my family lives in an environment which this does not happen.

Please dont take any of this the wrong way. If I upset any of you I'm sorry. I am only attempting to clear up this discussion from a different perspective.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-11-2010, 02:32 PM
 
5,150 posts, read 3,414,889 times
Reputation: 1382
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tolliver12 View Post
Now I know this thread is two years old but I've been considering moving to Charlotte so I've been reading various threads to get some insight from the people who actually live there.

Obviously I didn't read this entire thread so what I am going to write may have already been said. Now to answer the original post...

In my opinion, the reason why people are so concerned with diversity (myself included) is they don't want to feel isolated in a particular neighborhood. I'm an African American male in my late 20's with a wife and child and I currently live in CT. My wife and I are both professionals and consider ourselves middle class. Now, getting back to the question. Here in CT you would be very hard pressed to find diversity in the suburbs. I for one grew up in a suburban, all white, neighborhood. The issue is that you are always the odd ball and people will actually at times stop and stare as if they've never seen a brown face before. So many of us (middle class black people) have no problem living in an all white neighborhood so long as the neighborhood has no problem with us. There is also the issue of your child being the only black kid at his school, again, this is only an issue if he/she is subjected to racism because of being the only.

The bottom line is, when we see other African Americans in an upscale neighborhood we feel as though if these blacks live here comfortably there should be no issue with us living here. Most people just want to be accepted. I dont care what color the people are in my neighborhood as long as they treat me and my family with respect. I know what its like to be "the only" and subjected to ridicule because of it and I like many others want to make sure my family lives in an environment which this does not happen.

Please dont take any of this the wrong way. If I upset any of you I'm sorry. I am only attempting to clear up this discussion from a different perspective.
I don't consider my neighborhood to be upper class. I guess middle-middle in 28214 near Mount Holly. There are large neighborhoods around here and ours is about 23 years old and about 600 units.

It was mildly diverse when I got here and has become more so. Plenty of black families, Asian, and some Middle Eastern.

In fact, a gentleman who used to drive a cab that was recently shot and killed working in an "internet cafe" was from my hood.

I'm guessing the average cost for houses in my area is $130K which can get you 3 bedrooms, 1650+ sq ft and 1/3rd acre maybe.

Were 5 miles from Mountain Island Lake where you can go $400K+ for upper class. A lot of the early people to move in were from Microsoft and the airlines.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-12-2010, 11:41 AM
 
980 posts, read 949,621 times
Reputation: 359
having lived in the northeast and am currently in the midwest..i would say a i am interested in their being culturally diverse neighborhoods and schools, some of the most closed minded racist people i have ever met i worked with in the midwest...I wouldn't want my children to know that existed to that degree (even though they most likely do)..some of my kids best friends are of a different races

but there are plenteously of reason people ask, i would ask because I would want it, others maybe not so much
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-12-2010, 01:44 PM
 
308 posts, read 325,107 times
Reputation: 276
Quote:
Originally Posted by mewith3 View Post
having lived in the northeast and am currently in the midwest..i would say a i am interested in their being culturally diverse neighborhoods and schools, some of the most closed minded racist people i have ever met i worked with in the midwest...I wouldn't want my children to know that existed to that degree (even though they most likely do)..some of my kids best friends are of a different races

but there are plenteously of reason people ask, i would ask because I would want it, others maybe not so much
Pretty interesting. I lived in Boston for some time. I would have to say that some of the most racist people that I have met come from Boston. But, I know that I would be labeling everyone there just because I heard racist comments and saw attitudes from a small percentage of the population. I don't think it is reasonable to criticse a section of a country just because the people there don't have an identical attitude or outlook. People experence different things. If you come from a small New England town, you will have a very different experience and perception than the person that live in Rockford , Illinois. I hope you can overcome your personal negativeness against people in the midwest and adapt to the environment at which you chose to live. I find people in the midwest as very genuine and friendly. But, I look for the good in people and try to block out the bad. It makes life so much easier.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-19-2010, 08:10 AM
 
980 posts, read 949,621 times
Reputation: 359
Quote:
Originally Posted by newcomerfromuk View Post
Pretty interesting. I lived in Boston for some time. I would have to say that some of the most racist people that I have met come from Boston. But, I know that I would be labeling everyone there just because I heard racist comments and saw attitudes from a small percentage of the population. I don't think it is reasonable to criticse a section of a country just because the people there don't have an identical attitude or outlook. People experence different things. If you come from a small New England town, you will have a very different experience and perception than the person that live in Rockford , Illinois. I hope you can overcome your personal negativeness against people in the midwest and adapt to the environment at which you chose to live. I find people in the midwest as very genuine and friendly. But, I look for the good in people and try to block out the bad. It makes life so much easier.
I did not label everyone nor did I mean to...the fact is I was truly surprised at how racists some of my fellow workers are/were. I did not try to say this was a midwest thing either. I was only trying to explain why people look for diversity in a town/school/neighborhood/area where they plan to live.
I believe that people in general don't have this same attitude and I am thankful for that. I actually very surprised by the racist remarks I have heard here (and I grew up in a small new england town).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-19-2010, 08:39 AM
 
Location: Yellow Brick Road
35,485 posts, read 43,333,736 times
Reputation: 19885
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tolliver12 View Post
Now I know this thread is two years old but I've been considering moving to Charlotte so I've been reading various threads to get some insight from the people who actually live there.

Obviously I didn't read this entire thread so what I am going to write may have already been said. Now to answer the original post...

In my opinion, the reason why people are so concerned with diversity (myself included) is they don't want to feel isolated in a particular neighborhood. I'm an African American male in my late 20's with a wife and child and I currently live in CT. My wife and I are both professionals and consider ourselves middle class. Now, getting back to the question. Here in CT you would be very hard pressed to find diversity in the suburbs. I for one grew up in a suburban, all white, neighborhood. The issue is that you are always the odd ball and people will actually at times stop and stare as if they've never seen a brown face before. So many of us (middle class black people) have no problem living in an all white neighborhood so long as the neighborhood has no problem with us. There is also the issue of your child being the only black kid at his school, again, this is only an issue if he/she is subjected to racism because of being the only.

The bottom line is, when we see other African Americans in an upscale neighborhood we feel as though if these blacks live here comfortably there should be no issue with us living here. Most people just want to be accepted. I dont care what color the people are in my neighborhood as long as they treat me and my family with respect. I know what its like to be "the only" and subjected to ridicule because of it and I like many others want to make sure my family lives in an environment which this does not happen.

Please dont take any of this the wrong way. If I upset any of you I'm sorry. I am only attempting to clear up this discussion from a different perspective.
Yes, the thread is 2 years old - so I was surprised to see it pop up again - but your perspective IS very helpful to understanding why folks would ask this question.

I felt many of the posts answered the question I had posed very well and your post gives a great explanation, too.

I had felt that most people would never subject someone to ridicule just b/c they were of a different race, cultural background, religion, sexual orientation, etc . . . but I have learned that people have, indeed, felt "singled out" in situations over the years (whether it was b/c they were a minority, gay, disabled, etc). Sadly, these experiences have taught folks that they need to be careful where they choose to live. Pretty disappointing commentary on our society to think someone would feel singled out, but evidently this does still happen in the 21st Century.

Really appreciate your post, Tolliver. I think you would find that your family will not be singled out here in Charlotte. I live in south Charlotte, and we have many different situations in our neighborhood - retired, newly married, single, gay, recent emigrants from other countries . . . and different races, of course. I have never heard disparaging remarks about anyone in our neighborhood. The worst things said are probably about me, when I leave my garbage can out more than 24 hours, hee hee.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-19-2010, 01:36 PM
 
308 posts, read 325,107 times
Reputation: 276
I believe that people in general don't have this same attitude and I am thankful for that. I actually very surprised by the racist remarks I have heard here (and I grew up in a small new england town).[/quote]

You have made my point. You come from a small New England town and likely in a non crime ridden area. Your environment was much different than your environment here. Your experience were different. In New England, people have their issues with the Irish, Polish, Italian, etc. You probably think very little of it when someone says something derrogatory about one of these groups. Yes, people don't have the same attitude. And, as I have seen it as an outsider, not part of the country is less racist than any other.It depends on the make up of the community/city and the expeiences there people face. It just depends on what your ethnic group happens to be. And, it definately isn't only whites that are racist as you may likely contend. I don't think people buy the finger pointing these days. I find Charlotte very liberal compared to most cities in which I have lived throughout the U.S.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-19-2010, 10:28 PM
 
299 posts, read 326,728 times
Reputation: 175
Ethinic and cultural diversity is important for the free exchange of ideas and progress of understanding. In an area that has many different cultures living together everyone gets exposure, which leads to understanding, tolerance, and education (and GREAT food choices! ). Homogeneous areas tend to suffer from myopia. At least, in my experience.
Where we live right now is not especially diverse, but we're trying to sell and I hope to eventually live in an area that has more of everything.
In a semi related note, the real estate market sucks and is putting a massive damper on my plans
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:



Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > North Carolina > Charlotte

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top