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Old 01-30-2007, 10:01 AM
 
Location: Crown Town
2,742 posts, read 5,984,593 times
Reputation: 1666

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Check123 View Post
New York:

Year Population
1980 17,558,165
1990 17,990 455
2000 18,976,457
2010 19,443,672
I’m not sure why you posted those numbers, or where you got them from, but NY’s population “did” decline between 2004 and 2005 (please see below)…

Annual Estimates of the Population for Counties of New York: April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2005

New York State

July 1, 2005 – 19,254,630

July 1, 2004 – 19,280,727

Source: New York State Department of Labor

http://www.labor.state.ny.us/workfor...en/popest2.asp


And while the state is expected to grow in population between now and 2030 (per the Census Bureau), its population growth between that time is expected to rank 46th out of the 50 states in the country.

See link: http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/2005/stateproj7.xls (broken link)
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Old 01-30-2007, 11:40 AM
 
480 posts, read 2,642,506 times
Reputation: 172
Point being, net population is increasing. My numbers came from the U.S. Census Bureau. Accordingly...

New York :

July 1, 2005 19,315,721
July 1, 2004 19,291,526


Yes, the NY growth rate will be slow over the next 33 years. And for very good reason; it's been growing for the past 230 years. I do believe that NC was one of the original 13 colonies. Looks like it's a bit late to the party.

Last edited by Check123; 01-30-2007 at 12:05 PM..
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Old 01-30-2007, 11:50 AM
 
156 posts, read 664,406 times
Reputation: 78
I think it's a shame about upstate NY, I don't know if Rochester has the same plight though.
My son went to college in Rochester, RIT, and it's a great school.
He's currently still living up there, but will be moving back home soon. I think he's just tired of the really cold weather.
But the town itself is great. Nice area of artsy shops and restaurants called Park Ave. Nice communities like Brighton,and Scottsville,and great shopping and the Best food stores, like Wegmans and Lori's. Affordable housing ,except the real estate taxes have gone up a lot. Great deaf-friendly attitudes and resources there too.
There are still alot of people who call this area home.
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Old 01-30-2007, 12:42 PM
 
Location: Crown Town
2,742 posts, read 5,984,593 times
Reputation: 1666
Quote:
Originally Posted by Check123 View Post
Point being, net population is increasing. My numbers came from the U.S. Census Bureau. Accordingly...

New York :

July 1, 2005 19,315,721
July 1, 2004 19,291,526


Yes, the NY growth rate will be slow over the next 33 years. And for very good reason; it's been growing for the past 230 years. I do believe that NC was one of the original 13 colonies. Looks like it's a bit late to the party.
Here are the most recent “official” numbers from the Census Bureau. I’ve also provided a link to the Census Bureau’s site. Not sure where you’re getting your numbers from, but your lack of “proof” is not helping your point.

New York:

July 1, 2006: 19,306,183

July 1, 2005: 19,315,721

Change, 2005 to 2006: -9,538

Link:
http://www.census.gov/popest/states/tables/NST-EST2006-03.xls (broken link)
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Old 01-30-2007, 01:27 PM
 
480 posts, read 2,642,506 times
Reputation: 172
Pay attention; you were initially comparing 2004 to 2005. Now you're comparing 2005 to 2006. My numbers are "official". In contrast, your original numbers were not.

From 2004 to 2005 there was a net increase of 24,195. From 2005 to 2006 there was a net decrease of 9,538. Yet, there is still a two year net gain of 14,657. In addition, the long-term 10, 20, and 30 year Census estimates are all net gains.

Last edited by Check123; 01-30-2007 at 02:05 PM..
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Old 01-30-2007, 01:57 PM
 
Location: Up above the world so high!
45,270 posts, read 88,302,020 times
Reputation: 39844
Quote:
Originally Posted by Check123 View Post
Pay attention; you were initially comparing 2004 to 2005. Now you're comparing 2005 to 2006. My numbers are "official". In contrast, your original numbers were not. Just like NC, you're catching up a bit late.

From 2004 to 2005 there was a net increase of 24,195. From 2005 to 2006 there was a net decrease of 9,538. Yet, there is still a two year net gain of 14,657. In addition, the long-term 10, 20, and 30 year Census estimates are all net gains.
And all this matters because....?
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Old 01-30-2007, 02:01 PM
 
480 posts, read 2,642,506 times
Reputation: 172
Good question. The original point is long gone.

Who's watching American Idol tonight?


Quote:
Originally Posted by lovesMountains View Post
And all this matters because....?
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Old 01-30-2007, 02:05 PM
 
Location: Jersey Shore
1,574 posts, read 4,348,299 times
Reputation: 1001
Quote:
Originally Posted by Check123 View Post
Good question. The original point is long gone.

Who's watching American Idol tonight?
Welcome back, Check123.
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Old 01-30-2007, 02:06 PM
 
Location: Crown Town
2,742 posts, read 5,984,593 times
Reputation: 1666
Quote:
Originally Posted by lovesMountains View Post
And all this matters because....?
It doesn’t matter. He’s attempting to say that New York’s population is actually growing, when the reality is, its not. As has been reported by the Census Bureau and the New York media. As I said, it really doesn’t matter, really…

______________________________

January 19, 2007

THE BIGGEST LOSERS

One of the more intriguing statistics in demography is migration among the 50 states. And especially revealing is the data on "out-migration," or those residents of a state who flee to what they must figure will be better climes, says the Wall Street Journal.

The Empire Center, a New York think tank, has inspected the latest Census Data on migration, and finds that two of the three biggest losers of people from 2005 to 2006 were California and New York.

For text:
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB116909227217879830.html

For study text:
http://www.empirecenter.org/pb/2007/...ting_new_y.php


_____________________________________

N.Y., Mass., R.I. lose population as rest of the nation grows

New York, Massachusetts and Rhode Island were the only states to lose population from 2004 to 2005. The U-S Census reports that New York lost 26-thousand residents, a tenth-of-a-percent decrease. Massachusetts also had a tenth-of-a-percent decline, losing 8-thousand. Rhode Island lost about 3-thousand, or three-tenths of a percent….

http://www.wstm.com/Global/story.asp?S=4279662&nav=2aKD (broken link)

__________________________________________

New York population fails to grow since 2005
(NY to lose 2 electoral votes)
The Citizen ^ | 12/22/06

Posted on 12/22/2006 2:29:22 PM PST by LdSentinal

ALBANY - Thousands of people left New York for other parts of the country last year, making it one of only three states that failed to grow since 2005, according to census estimates released Friday.

New York's estimated population on July 1 was 19.3 million, a drop of 9,538 from a year earlier, the U.S. Census Bureau reported. That drop is minuscule - 0.0005 percent - and based on estimates rather than an actual count. But census demographers say it shows New York's population remained virtually unchanged over the year.


http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1757497/posts

____________________________________________

…New York is one of the few states actually losing population, thanks in good part to people fleeing from upstate. One recent study found that the young adult population of upstate New York declined at nearly four times the national rate between 1990 and 2005. "If you are smart, ambitious, creative, and can produce, and are under 25, you get out of upstate New York as fast as you can," says Moss.

“http://news.yahoo.com/s/usnews/20070108/ts_usnews/theforgottennewyork (broken link)
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Old 01-30-2007, 04:36 PM
 
Location: Rhode Island
476 posts, read 1,451,182 times
Reputation: 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Check123 View Post
Good question. The original point is long gone.

Who's watching American Idol tonight?
Why taking it so personal? Do you get some kind of NY commission for high numbers? Maybe you should be in NY forum.
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