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Old 11-26-2008, 10:38 AM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 66,998,726 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheEmissary View Post
That is a situation that probably occurs much less frequently in CMS, where nearly a third of new teachers quit within a couple of years, but in places where a teaching job is like "gold in the bank", some people will do anything to get a foothold in the door. In places like NJ & NY if you didn't "know someone" even as far back as 40 years ago, your chances of getting a teaching job where you wanted might have been very slim. Having an Uncle or Aunt or brother in a position of power in a town, might make the difference between working in a nice school or being stuck in the crappy one, three towns away. Who you know in NJ can make a big diffrence in where you teach. I bet it is probably true in CMS, but not to the degree it is in most of the Northeast.

It was always much easier to get a teaching job in the major cities as opposed to the well-off suburbs. As we've seen over the last few days, very few people want to teach in what they perceive to be the "ghetto". This is true no matter where you teach. Most of the new teachers tend to get stuck in the worst schools and end up doing their "penance" for several years until they have enough seniority to move elsewhere or quit and go into a non-teaching career.

As I've said in previous posts relating to the title thread, the Charlotte area will continue to attract teachers although they will be "retired ones" from the NE and California, who just need to sell their homes. As soon as the housing markets recover to the degree they can, the transplants will be rolling back in again. Despite their "perceived flaws" or "perceived virtues" the major metro areas of Charlotte, Raleigh and to a lesser degree, the Coastal areas of NC will continue to draw in new residents.
Your analysis is exactly what is being predicted for this region. I will see if I can find some reports. Retirees are expected to dramatically affect the population in many areas - w/ CLT being one of them - and coastal cities - all up and down NC, SC and GA also being a big draw.
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Old 11-26-2008, 11:18 AM
 
Location: Noth Caccalacca
5,553 posts, read 6,665,938 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anifani821 View Post
Your analysis is exactly what is being predicted for this region. I will see if I can find some reports. Retirees are expected to dramatically affect the population in many areas - w/ CLT being one of them - and coastal cities - all up and down NC, SC and GA also being a big draw.
ani - I think that the Charlotte area is ripe to become a much bigger draw to retirees than it has been. For years, Charlotte has been perceived to be a family town as defined by the traditional nuclear family. But I think that this perception will modify a bit over time. Many of those young 20-30 somethings that start families here, are "mixed marriages", who have spouses that have parents residing in the North and West. Once the grandkids start coming, those parents often end up giving a great deal of thought to moving here to be closer to their children. I'd be willing to bet you know a few! These folks are in their 50s and 60s and may need a different style of housing than they had in their previous locations. I don't think these "young retirees" housing needs have been adequately served. I've visited places like Sun City over the SC border, but these places tend to be on the pricey side ($300-400K) and are few and far between. The traditional "Florida retirement" stereotype that was a staple of decades past, is quickly falling by the wayside due to the increasing hurricanes and home insurance costs. The Charlotte area could benefit by building housing to accomodate the increasing number of retirees (all of us baby boomers) rather than constantly emphasize the "young family" (they will always be the primary interest of the housing market). There is a great economic benefit to be realized from attracting retirees. They don't need schools and like I've always maintained - "Ambulances are cheaper than schools"!

Last edited by TheEmissary; 11-26-2008 at 11:23 AM.. Reason: sp
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Old 11-26-2008, 11:25 AM
 
549 posts, read 1,561,694 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheEmissary View Post
There is a great economic benefit to be realized from attracting retirees. They don't need schools and like I've always maintained - "Ambulances are cheaper than schools"!
As anyone who has lived near a Sun City community can tell you, having a bunch of retirees nearby is a mixed bag. When the community actually needs to sell bonds to build a school or a park the retirees often shoot it down. Retirees and the elderly also create a lot of service jobs but the jobs tend to be low paying. On a positive note retirees who can afford to live in a Sun City are usually financially secure.
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Old 11-26-2008, 11:42 AM
 
Location: Noth Caccalacca
5,553 posts, read 6,665,938 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Palmetto Heel View Post
As anyone who has lived near a Sun City community can tell you, having a bunch of retirees nearby is a mixed bag. When the community actually needs to sell bonds to build a school or a park the retirees often shoot it down. Retirees and the elderly also create a lot of service jobs but the jobs tend to be low paying. On a positive note retirees who can afford to live in a Sun City are usually financially secure.
Palmetto Heel - Truer words were never spoken! I'd like to see something more like a "mixed use development" where potential grandparents live only a few blocks away from their grandchildren in a smaller, more suitable house. Those "Sun City" type places tend to produce the attitudes you so aptly described. If your children and grandchildren are in the same development, that provincial thinking is less likely to occur, especially if Grandpa is sitting in the school auditorium watching little Joey in the school play. Some asute developer must start designing developments that are intra-generational, rather than the old geezers vs the young folks.
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Old 11-26-2008, 11:47 AM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 66,998,726 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheEmissary View Post
Palmetto Heel - Truer words were never spoken! I'd like to see something more like a "mixed use development" where potential grandparents live only a few blocks away from their grandchildren in a smaller, more suitable house. Those "Sun City" type places tend to produce the attitudes you so aptly described. If your children and grandchildren are in the same development, that provincial thinking is less likely to occur, especially if Grandpa is sitting in the school auditorium watching little Joey in the school play. Some asute developer must start designing developments that are intra-generational, rather than the old geezers vs the young folks.
I agree w/ both your sentiment and PALMETTO'S. I have seen it up close, too, and what tends to happen is the over 55 communities b/cm very isolationist, on many levels. Of course, not everyone who chooses these communities has that attitude! But if the majority do . . .
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Old 11-26-2008, 11:55 AM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
21,851 posts, read 27,123,355 times
Reputation: 8923
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheEmissary View Post
That is a situation that probably occurs much less frequently in CMS, where nearly a third of new teachers quit within a couple of years, but in places where a teaching job is like "gold in the bank", some people will do anything to get a foothold in the door. In places like NJ & NY if you didn't "know someone" even as far back as 40 years ago, your chances of getting a teaching job where you wanted might have been very slim. Having an Uncle or Aunt or brother in a position of power in a town, might make the difference between working in a nice school or being stuck in the crappy one, three towns away. Who you know in NJ can make a big diffrence in where you teach. I bet it is probably true in CMS, but not to the degree it is in most of the Northeast.

It was always much easier to get a teaching job in the major cities as opposed to the well-off suburbs. As we've seen over the last few days, very few people want to teach in what they perceive to be the "ghetto". This is true no matter where you teach. Most of the new teachers tend to get stuck in the worst schools and end up doing their "penance" for several years until they have enough seniority to move elsewhere or quit and go into a non-teaching career.

As I've said in previous posts relating to the title thread, the Charlotte area will continue to attract teachers although they will be "retired ones" from the NE and California, who just need to sell their homes. As soon as the housing markets recover to the degree they can, the transplants will be rolling back in again. Despite their "perceived flaws" or "perceived virtues" the major metro areas of Charlotte, Raleigh and to a lesser degree, the Coastal areas of NC will continue to draw in new residents.
You're 100% right, Emissary. What I referred to did happen. The school was private.

People have been hanging on in South Jersey for years, while businesses fled &/or folded. The latest round of newcomers drove up the real estate & the property taxes are now crushing. Most of the people I know are now planning an escape. They are planning to go to Delaware, Virginia, & various points in North Carolina. Some will be retired, others will take early retirement & look for part-time work. Others will be looking for work. None of us are unskilled or uneducated, but it's just impossible to break even at this point.

I expect that a lot of people from South Jersey will head out to the western counties like I did. We're coming from a different economy, & while many of us worked in Philly at some point, it's just different. We're used to rehabbing houses & we're used to more space. Also, real estate value in South Jersey is much closed to the Charlotte market, so we aren't going to come in the same position, unless it's a younger person with a good transfer.

Last edited by southbound_295; 11-26-2008 at 12:03 PM..
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Old 11-26-2008, 11:57 AM
 
Location: Noth Caccalacca
5,553 posts, read 6,665,938 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anifani821 View Post
I agree w/ both your sentiment and PALMETTO'S. I have seen it up close, too, and what tends to happen is the over 55 communities b/cm very isolationist, on many levels. Of course, not everyone who chooses these communities has that attitude! But if the majority do . . .
That's why you'll never see me in a golf cart idling at the corner of Depends Dr and Polident Pl. I'd prefer to have a mix of young and old like I currently do!
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Old 11-26-2008, 12:39 PM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 66,998,726 times
Reputation: 22370
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheEmissary View Post
That's why you'll never see me in a golf cart idling at the corner of Depends Dr and Polident Pl. I'd prefer to have a mix of young and old like I currently do!
HEE HEE HEE!!! Dear Em, you know you want that golf cart!! ROFL!!!
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Old 11-26-2008, 12:44 PM
 
Location: Noth Caccalacca
5,553 posts, read 6,665,938 times
Reputation: 4836
Quote:
Originally Posted by southbound_295 View Post
You're 100% right, Emissary. What I referred to did happen. The school was private.

People have been hanging on in South Jersey for years, while businesses fled &/or folded. The latest round of newcomers drove up the real estate & the property taxes are now crushing. Most of the people I know are now planning an escape. They are planning to go to Delaware, Virginia, & various points in North Carolina. Some will be retired, others will take early retirement & look for part-time work. Others will be looking for work. None of us are unskilled or uneducated, but it's just impossible to break even at this point.

I expect that a lot of people from South Jersey will head out to the western counties like I did. We're coming from a different economy, & while many of us worked in Philly at some point, it's just different. We're used to rehabbing houses & we're used to more space. Also, real estate value in South Jersey is much closed to the Charlotte market, so we aren't going to come in the same position, unless it's a younger person with a good transfer.
southbound_295 - I believe that a good deal of the exodus from the NYC metro area was created by 9/11. It seemed to me that after that point, thousands of New Yorkers streamed into Northern NJ and helped create the local housing craze in that area. Many of the sellers of those homes, in turn, fled the area entirely for places like Charlotte, Raleigh and Atlanta. Even alot of the expensive shore areas saw influxes of wealthy New York City apartment dwellers who sold their pricey apartments for the Monmouth and Ocean County suburbs.

I think that the only time in my life I was in your "area" was in 1973 when I took 95S to get to Raleigh. It's amazing that as small as NJ is, that I've only been down as far as Atlantic City and know practically nothing about South Jersey. It remains as nebulous in my mind as central and southeastern NC. I know it's there, but what precisely is there, remains a mystery!

I suspect that you actually are a "new demographic type", in that you have decided to settle in area which is not the "inevitable" major metro area that most tranplants select. The farthest I've gotten out of the Charlotte area is a day shopping trip to Hickory which was eye-opening for me. The area looks beautiful and is much more "hilly" than I thought it would be. It reminds me of Warren and Hunterdon County. I guess relative to me you are in the "New Frontier" of NC. Keep us metro-area city people up to snuff on what you encounter!
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Old 11-26-2008, 06:00 PM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
21,851 posts, read 27,123,355 times
Reputation: 8923
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheEmissary View Post
southbound_295 - I believe that a good deal of the exodus from the NYC metro area was created by 9/11. It seemed to me that after that point, thousands of New Yorkers streamed into Northern NJ and helped create the local housing craze in that area. Many of the sellers of those homes, in turn, fled the area entirely for places like Charlotte, Raleigh and Atlanta. Even alot of the expensive shore areas saw influxes of wealthy New York City apartment dwellers who sold their pricey apartments for the Monmouth and Ocean County suburbs.

I think that the only time in my life I was in your "area" was in 1973 when I took 95S to get to Raleigh. It's amazing that as small as NJ is, that I've only been down as far as Atlantic City and know practically nothing about South Jersey. It remains as nebulous in my mind as central and southeastern NC. I know it's there, but what precisely is there, remains a mystery!

I suspect that you actually are a "new demographic type", in that you have decided to settle in area which is not the "inevitable" major metro area that most tranplants select. The farthest I've gotten out of the Charlotte area is a day shopping trip to Hickory which was eye-opening for me. The area looks beautiful and is much more "hilly" than I thought it would be. It reminds me of Warren and Hunterdon County. I guess relative to me you are in the "New Frontier" of NC. Keep us metro-area city people up to snuff on what you encounter!
Emissary, while I wouldn't say it while I was there, I was in Cherry Hill, in an older section, a few blocks from Haddonfield.

Yesterday I made my first trip into South Charlotte to start the bidding process on a house in Kings Mountain.

I was thrilled to get into a Trader Joe's, while I was there.

While I was in South Charlotte, I saw the non-stop big fancy houses on the tiny lots. I would be so unhappy there. I would not fit in. Although I lived 10 miles from Center City Philly, I was in the suburbs & the houses were spaced much forther apart, for the most part. I could easily access the countryside, which is still full of farms. Frankly, I was relieved to get back out to Kings Mountain.

I'll go back to do shopping that is not available here, but I'll check online & figure out where stores are clustered.

There are plenty of transplants out here, but midwesterners are more common. The houses are more spaced out, for the most part. There is new construction, but loads of available older houses, because of mill closures.

The new Ingles is a big deal here. People are going from surrounding communities. Last week I overheard a woman say that she had driven there from her house in Belmont & commented that it was the best supermarket that she'd been in since moving to the area. Her accent was northeastern.

I've been out to Shelby several times, as well as going to Cherryville & Lincolnton but haven't done the shopping trip to Gastonia yet. Driving around out here is similar to how driving in South Jersey used to be before the hordes arrived.
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