U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > North Carolina > Charlotte
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 01-20-2009, 07:48 PM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,212,814 times
Reputation: 22375

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by smclarke4 View Post
Really, I have just adopted a large lab pup (about a year or just under a year) and I had forgotten how bouncy they can be. He is hyper and I bought the gentle lead headgear but I can't get to grips with it. Tonight I have just bought the collar and choke combo to see if I can control him better on walks. Any advice about walking would be gratefully received. I am worn out!!!
Whew - a dog pulling on lead is exhausting!!!

Without seeing the behavior myself . . . I can suggest a few things in general.

1. walk often, as that in itself will take some of the novelty out of the action
2. never let your dog go out the door in front of you. hold the leash tightly (pull UP) and keep him in heel position. This reinforces that you are in charge and he is to follow you, not vice versa.
3. The main command you have to teach FIRST is SIT. Use treats to reinforce SIT. Carry treats w/ you when you walk and when he is pulling, command him to sit, use your legs/foot to gently "butt" him into position, if necessary. Immediately give a treat upon compliance.
4. Have you considered using a Clicker? There are many articles that will guide you on using a Clicker in conjunction w/ commands.
5. You are going to have to get your doggie's attention b/f you can make progress. This is going to mean insisting he become calm and attentive when you are teaching him. This might take you many sessions of repetitive commands, if his mind is wandering.
6. Some breeds just need a lot of running time, wh/ means a fenced yard is a necessity.
7. Inside, have a bed that is his and when he gets hyper, take him to the bed and command LIE DOWN. You may have to entice w/ a toy and a treat to reinforce the proper action. You might have to stand there for a long time b/f you get the right behavior. You will have to be more tenacious than he is, LOL (not easy!!!!!)

REMEMBER - if you say NO 9 times and the 10th time you give in, you have completely un-done any progress!!! It only takes one time out of 10 for a dog to process your reaction as "okay - I don't have to follow directions after all." That is true for every negative behavior - from begging at the table to climbing on furniture. Consistency is everything.

Also - make sure your dog has plenty of toys to keep him occupied - so that his need for activity is not constantly expressed by running all over the place, jumping, etc.

I don't know if any of those suggestions will help or not . . . but I hope something will!!!

 
Old 01-20-2009, 08:04 PM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC
7,041 posts, read 13,137,084 times
Reputation: 2324
Quote:
Originally Posted by anifani821 View Post
Oh, heavens, no. I have to say it - and I sure hope someone has had a different experience, but I have never seen a Chow-mix that worked. I have had trainers tell me that, too. Chows are natured more like cats and I think when you mix the genetics/personality traits w/ other breeds- it just doesn't always come out too well. Ordinarily, a well bred chow will stay on its own property and guard its own space - and not have the desire to mess w/ other people's spaces. They are very good in apartments, condos and inside, b/c they sleep all the time and are not very active dogs. Oh sure, she loves her walkies - and all my chows have always like running in sprints, but not for long periods. They are homebodies.

Scarlett is the belle of the ball here in the neighborhood, b/c she loves kids and also is very protective of everyone's property. She barks if anyone pulls into the neighbors' houses. She is the reason I always know what is going on in the neighborhood - she was trained as a guard dog and she takes her "patrol" duties very seriously. The neighbors all love her b/c she has bonded w/ them as a pup . . .

However, I had the scare of my life once from a poorly bred chow who was just plain mean . . .
Well, I am enough of a dog lover not to equate ALL chows with the one that cruelly killed my son's pet chickens...however, I will say that I would not have been upset had DS been at home and shot it. DS said that the neighbour offered to put it down, but, he said no. I am not sure that I agree with that decision, because I figure now that the dog knows that the chickens are just a yard or two away, he will be literally chomping at the bit to get back at them. Maybe I am a cynic, but, I think that once they taste blood like that, there is no turning back.

The neighbour is going to try to replace the chickens...good luck...most were very rare breeds and were now full grown. As DS stated, he just does not want to wait another year to get to the point that he was when the others were killed. They were just now producing eggs regularly and had developed a pattern of behaviour, they were "trained"...(well, as trained as chickens can be!)and not afraid of DS or DIL. It was just tragic that this (apparently) untrained dog got loose and destroyed so much!
 
Old 01-21-2009, 12:07 AM
 
876 posts, read 3,487,496 times
Reputation: 234
hello.
 
Old 01-21-2009, 05:29 AM
 
1,907 posts, read 4,455,949 times
Reputation: 730
Good Morning . Just got the DS off to school and Baby, it's cold outside!!!
 
Old 01-21-2009, 06:46 AM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,212,814 times
Reputation: 22375
CHI - that is just a horrific story about the chickens . . . NO dog of any breed should attack livestock!!! The most a dog should do is bark at any type of livestock, be it chickens or sheep. I had a chow on a farm (decades ago) who was very protective of the cows, goats and even the guineas. I have pictures of that sweet dog w/ the two cats that slept on him - they groomed one another. A dog should not run after anyone's livestock - whether at the dog's home or at someone else's home. I hate to say it - but this particular dog in question should not be left outside, off leash (even in a fence) and needs to undergo a very consistent training program b/c he has a rogue personality that needs to be re-programmed.
 
Old 01-21-2009, 07:17 AM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC
7,041 posts, read 13,137,084 times
Reputation: 2324
Quote:
Originally Posted by anifani821 View Post
CHI - that is just a horrific story about the chickens . . . NO dog of any breed should attack livestock!!! The most a dog should do is bark at any type of livestock, be it chickens or sheep. I had a chow on a farm (decades ago) who was very protective of the cows, goats and even the guineas. I have pictures of that sweet dog w/ the two cats that slept on him - they groomed one another. A dog should not run after anyone's livestock - whether at the dog's home or at someone else's home. I hate to say it - but this particular dog in question should not be left outside, off leash (even in a fence) and needs to undergo a very consistent training program b/c he has a rogue personality that needs to be re-programmed.
Well, that's what I said. I said that I could see the dogs chasing the chickens (because they run), but, not actually killing them and tearing them to bits. DS is trying to be fair. I am now terrified that this creature will now be a greater predator than all the raccoons and foxes/wolves/bobcats combined. At least the wild animals are stalking the chickens for food. This dog, assuming that he is well fed, is doing this for...sport??

Anyway, MIL (me) needs to stay up here in the University area and mind my own beeswax. My personal favourite chickens survived, two are traumatized as they saw it all, the other was in the nesting box so she is oblivious. I want to hug them, but, chickens don't like being held. They need a rooster first and foremost (both of the previous ones were destroyed) and DS is working on getting one before he has to go out of town next week again on business. They've lost 40 chickens now in the year 2008. Makes the small chicken farm a little more difficult than anyone thought!!
 
Old 01-21-2009, 07:21 AM
 
852 posts, read 2,219,108 times
Reputation: 314
Quote:
Originally Posted by anifani821 View Post
CHI - that is just a horrific story about the chickens . . . NO dog of any breed should attack livestock!!! The most a dog should do is bark at any type of livestock, be it chickens or sheep. I had a chow on a farm (decades ago) who was very protective of the cows, goats and even the guineas. I have pictures of that sweet dog w/ the two cats that slept on him - they groomed one another. A dog should not run after anyone's livestock - whether at the dog's home or at someone else's home. I hate to say it - but this particular dog in question should not be left outside, off leash (even in a fence) and needs to undergo a very consistent training program b/c he has a rogue personality that needs to be re-programmed.
Growing up in Ireland we were surrounded by sheep and our dog although not a sheep dog did not venture near our sheep. Now joining a pack is very common and he was caught and killed I may add with a pack worrying another flock. The farmer shot the dogs and every one of the dogs had sheeps blood on them.
 
Old 01-21-2009, 07:29 AM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC
7,041 posts, read 13,137,084 times
Reputation: 2324
Quote:
Originally Posted by smclarke4 View Post
Growing up in Ireland we were surrounded by sheep and our dog although not a sheep dog did not venture near our sheep. Now joining a pack is very common and he was caught and killed I may add with a pack worrying another flock. The farmer shot the dogs and every one of the dogs had sheeps blood on them.
But, it is not "normal" for a dog to do this on his own, is it?
 
Old 01-21-2009, 08:04 AM
 
Location: Weddington
334 posts, read 683,229 times
Reputation: 225
Quote:
Originally Posted by smclarke4 View Post
Growing up in Ireland we were surrounded by sheep and our dog although not a sheep dog did not venture near our sheep. Now joining a pack is very common and he was caught and killed I may add with a pack worrying another flock. The farmer shot the dogs and every one of the dogs had sheeps blood on them.
Grew up on a farm in Ireland as well, our sheep dogs were amazing, but one of most traumatic memories as a kid was my dad shooting one of the dogs, and not understanding why. I asked my Dad years later why he did that, and he said the dog just one day turned on the sheep and killed one of them and it was game over for him. I remember the dogs never being allowed to come in the house they were all truly work dogs.
 
Old 01-21-2009, 08:46 AM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,212,814 times
Reputation: 22375
Quote:
Originally Posted by chicagocubs View Post
But, it is not "normal" for a dog to do this on his own, is it?
It would be a "rogue" dog that did this. As SMCLARKE said - yes, the pack mentality can set in . . . and as IVSTER relayed, when that happens w/ a working dog, I have always been told - once a dog turns like that - it is just over. You have no recourse but to either put them down, or keep that dog under constant surveillance (fenced/penned/indoors).

Almost any dog will enjoy barking and chasing (playfully) after squirrels, cats, etc. But a dog that would actually HARM an animal once it has that animal cornered - that is not an animal I would want to have around.

Scarlett is having to adjust to having a cat in the house. She is no longer chasing the cat as much and they are now touching noses, rubbing each other. When the cat was very little, I was worried that Scarlett might be overly rough and harm the cat unintentionally. But now that the cat is bigger, they seem to be on the road to becoming pals. That is the type of behavior you should expect from a dog - they will be curious about other animals and may even want to play and chase - but as far as harming . . . no way.

The neighbor's dog that killed those hens - something ain't right w/ that dog.
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Closed Thread



Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > North Carolina > Charlotte
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:50 AM.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top