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Old 01-08-2009, 07:43 PM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 65,287,097 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blabber View Post
I dont get why Vancouver is again part of this discussion..

pointless city comparison discussions are a waste of time. Good things about ATL, Good things about Charlotte...bad things about ATL...bad things about Charlotte..
Agree - the whole Vancouver thing lost me a page or two back . . .

The OP asked - do we think Charlotte and Atlanta are similar . . . and I think we have pretty well compared the two and the consensus is that basically, the two cities are very different except both are essentially landlocked (altho w/ bodies of water nearby) and both are south of the Mason Dixon line.

 
Old 01-08-2009, 07:55 PM
 
Location: Shaker Heights, OH
236 posts, read 602,212 times
Reputation: 97
They also both have two "t"'s in their name....and an "l"
 
Old 01-08-2009, 08:18 PM
 
Location: metro ATL
8,190 posts, read 11,853,318 times
Reputation: 2698
I think that Atlanta and Charlotte do share one very essential characteristic, which is a reason why these comparisons often pop up: the aggressiveness of their business communities.
 
Old 01-08-2009, 09:06 PM
 
Location: Dallas
1,366 posts, read 2,242,209 times
Reputation: 789
I understood where you were going with that Urbancharlotte.
 
Old 01-08-2009, 09:07 PM
 
4,675 posts, read 7,811,095 times
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Charlotte is similiar to ATLs downtown.
When you add in Buckhead, Midtown, and Atlantic Station, Charlotte is way behind. Atlanta is THE city of the South. I do believe Charlotte will catch up to Atlanta. Like all cities (Philly, NYC, Boston, etc.) they reach a point to where they don't really grow much. By this I am referring to rate of growth. Atlanta is starting to flatline in terms of percentage in growth whereas Charlotte is growing at a higher percentage. This means Atlanta and its suburbs are about reaching a point where they have grown so much they have about reach their end. Growth is still happening but not as fast as or as much to when it was growing in the 70s and 80s.

Charlotte is still growing faster (BTW, Raleigh is growing faster) than ATL, and I believe our economy will continue to diversify being spearheaded by academic institutions and people who realize our bread and butter banking industry is not stable.
 
Old 01-08-2009, 09:14 PM
 
Location: Shaker Heights, OH
236 posts, read 602,212 times
Reputation: 97
I think that most people on these blogs know what dense is and what not dense is..We don't need to see a picture of Vancouver, NY, or Chicago to know that Atlanta, Charlotte, Raleigh, Jacksonville, Nashville, Dallas, Houston, Reno are not Vancouver, NY or Chicago....LOL...
 
Old 01-09-2009, 04:50 PM
 
553 posts, read 500,168 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anifani821 View Post
Interesting post, Brichard and some great points about urban vibe.

Just wanted to comment that I believe the general consensus in Charlotte is that we do NOT see Atlanta as a "role model." In fact, the only time the topic comes up - Charlotte compared to Atlanta - is when someone from outside Charlotte poses a question about the two cities.
I'm glad to know that. I think it would be a big mistake by the urban planners in Charlotte to try to follow Atlanta's example. Someone here keeps making comments about Atlanta's three or four skylines, as if that's supposed to impress everybody. All that tells me is that the city is too spread out and the city planners have failed to reign in and focus its growth. Had there been some forethought to concentrate that growth into one area, perhaps it could have developed a lively urban core. I remember walking around Centennial Olympic Park in Atlanta. It's a huge park, but there were only a handful of other people there. And this was in the middle of the day and it's right in downtown Atlanta. I was living in Washington, DC at that time and this is not what I expected to see in a city the size of Atlanta. And as I mentioned earlier, I also went up to the top of Peachtree Plaza and, looking out, could see that the suburbs started just a couple blocks from Peachtree. I left there at about 6:00 PM (this was on a Friday) and had to walk about eight to ten blocks from there to meet a friend. There was very little activity going on. I didn't pass that many people along the way. And every activity I did with my Atlanta friends (who live there) involved getting in the car and driving to some shopping mall. How boring and unoriginal is that? That was in 2001. Maybe things have changed drastically since then, but I doubt it.

DC is a whole different experience: Georgetown, Capitol Hill, Adams Morgan, etc. -- these neighborhoods and others are always buzzing with activity. Most people I knew when I lived in DC opted NOT to own a vehicle. They didn't need one and didn't want one. I live in San Diego now. It's a much smaller city than Atlanta in terms of metro population, but feels to me much more like a city than Atlanta. No, the skyline of San Diego doesn't match Atlanta's in terms of the height of its buildings, but there is a very vibrant downtown here. True, there is also a lot of sprawl in San Diego, but there is still a big part of the city with a concentrated urban population. In my neighborhood, though I do drive to work, I can walk to restaurants, bars, the grocery store, post office, etc. And I know people in downtown SD who live, work and party there. They never have to get in their cars. I don't think a lot of people in Atlanta can say the same thing. Nor can they in Charlotte, but from what I can tell, the Charlotte city planners are trying to move things in that direction and give people an option for urban living. For that reason alone, if I were to move back to the southeast, I would consider Charlotte before I would Atlanta. I consider myself a city person, but even though Atlanta is and may always be larger than Charlotte in terms of metro population, I can see Charlotte developing into more of a city than Atlanta. For that matter, Richmond, VA is smaller than both Charlotte and Atlanta, but has more of an urban vibe going on than either. There's not much of a skyline there, but how often do you call your friends up to go out and look at the skyline, versus going out to dinner or dance or hang out at a festival in the park? What difference does it make having those big buildings if nothing's going on beneath them? Bottom line: Charlotte, please keep doing what you're doing. Look to Atlanta only as an example of how not to grow your city.

Last edited by brichard; 01-09-2009 at 05:11 PM..
 
Old 01-09-2009, 04:57 PM
 
Location: The 12th State
22,974 posts, read 57,247,098 times
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lets try to keep the conversation ONLY on the topic Charlotte vs Atlanta and not other cities
 
Old 01-09-2009, 06:14 PM
 
1,303 posts, read 1,658,942 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brichard View Post
I'm glad to know that. I think it would be a big mistake by the urban planners in Charlotte to try to follow Atlanta's example. Someone here keeps making comments about Atlanta's three or four skylines, as if that's supposed to impress everybody. All that tells me is that the city is too spread out and the city planners have failed to reign in and focus its growth. Had there been some forethought to concentrate that growth into one area, perhaps it could have developed a lively urban core. I remember walking around Centennial Olympic Park in Atlanta. It's a huge park, but there were only a handful of other people there. And this was in the middle of the day and it's right in downtown Atlanta. I was living in Washington, DC at that time and this is not what I expected to see in a city the size of Atlanta. And as I mentioned earlier, I also went up to the top of Peachtree Plaza and, looking out, could see that the suburbs started just a couple blocks from Peachtree. I left there at about 6:00 PM (this was on a Friday) and had to walk about eight to ten blocks from there to meet a friend. There was very little activity going on. I didn't pass that many people along the way. And every activity I did with my Atlanta friends (who live there) involved getting in the car and driving to some shopping mall. How boring and unoriginal is that? That was in 2001. Maybe things have changed drastically since then, but I doubt it.

DC is a whole different experience: Georgetown, Capitol Hill, Adams Morgan, etc. -- these neighborhoods and others are always buzzing with activity. Most people I knew when I lived in DC opted NOT to own a vehicle. They didn't need one and didn't want one. I live in San Diego now. It's a much smaller city than Atlanta in terms of metro population, but feels to me much more like a city than Atlanta. No, the skyline of San Diego doesn't match Atlanta's in terms of the height of its buildings, but there is a very vibrant downtown here. True, there is also a lot of sprawl in San Diego, but there is still a big part of the city with a concentrated urban population. In my neighborhood, though I do drive to work, I can walk to restaurants, bars, the grocery store, post office, etc. And I know people in downtown SD who live, work and party there. They never have to get in their cars. I don't think a lot of people in Atlanta can say the same thing. Nor can they in Charlotte, but from what I can tell, the Charlotte city planners are trying to move things in that direction and give people an option for urban living. For that reason alone, if I were to move back to the southeast, I would consider Charlotte before I would Atlanta. I consider myself a city person, but even though Atlanta is and may always be larger than Charlotte in terms of metro population, I can see Charlotte developing into more of a city than Atlanta. For that matter, Richmond, VA is smaller than both Charlotte and Atlanta, but has more of an urban vibe going on than either. There's not much of a skyline there, but how often do you call your friends up to go out and look at the skyline, versus going out to dinner or dance or hang out at a festival in the park? What difference does it make having those big buildings if nothing's going on beneath them? Bottom line: Charlotte, please keep doing what you're doing. Look to Atlanta only as an example of how not to grow your city.
OH child please these southern citys are not northeastern citys. You will only find northern citys to have a true urbancore. sunbelt citys were not designed to have everything piled up in one area. Atlanta is developing the samething in Midtown, When the midtown mile is finished it will have that same urbanwcore that atlanta need with resaturants, street shops and bars. Not everyone gets in there cars to go to the mall. there are lots of people riding the train to Lenox and phipps the are 2 stations that go to the malls vs in charlotte everyone has to drive because there is no train that serves there malls. Also centinneal park is always packed during the summer now with the atttraction near it and they have free concerts there and family events such as green on the screen so you need to maybe visit atlanta again during the summer and maybe you will see the difference from 2001. these are some good urban areas in atlanta
 
Old 01-09-2009, 06:47 PM
 
553 posts, read 500,168 times
Reputation: 531
You missed my point there. It wasn't about how we got to the mall, but the fact that everything we did involved going to a mall. Every city has shopping malls, so there was nothing special about that. I'm glad to know Atlanta is trying to do something now to create some urban vitality. I'm just saying I didn't see any when I was there. And my impression at the time was that Charlotte was ahead of Atlanta in terms of urban vitality. I'm not saying there's much of that there, either, just that the Charlotte city planners seemed to be doing more. And yes, I understand the northeast tends to have more of an urban core as those cities were developed before the automobile. But there are a lot of cities outside the northeast that have tried to create one. I mentioned San Diego as one (and, of course San Francisco). Downtown Seattle is also a very happening place (and I've heard Portland is, as well). Some of these cities are much smaller than Atlanta, and just as young or younger, yet have much more vitality. I'll have to check out Atlanta again some day, but from what I saw a few years ago, and what I know about Charlotte, Charlotte seems to be more on the ball than Atlanta in that department.

Quote:
Originally Posted by atlantaATL View Post
OH child please these southern citys are not northeastern citys. You will only find northern citys to have a true urbancore. sunbelt citys were not designed to have everything piled up in one area. Atlanta is developing the samething in Midtown, When the midtown mile is finished it will have that same urbanwcore that atlanta need with resaturants, street shops and bars. Not everyone gets in there cars to go to the mall. there are lots of people riding the train to Lenox and phipps the are 2 stations that go to the malls vs in charlotte everyone has to drive because there is no train that serves there malls. Also centinneal park is always packed during the summer now with the atttraction near it and they have free concerts there and family events such as green on the screen so you need to maybe visit atlanta again during the summer and maybe you will see the difference from 2001. these are some good urban areas in atlanta
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