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Old 04-03-2009, 08:54 PM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC
7,041 posts, read 13,134,749 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anifani821 View Post
What on earth is a "heelsplitter?" Never heard of this.
it's a type of mussel that grows in creek beds here. It is endangered.
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Old 04-03-2009, 09:03 PM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,199,962 times
Reputation: 22375
Quote:
Originally Posted by chicagocubs View Post
it's a type of mussel that grows in creek beds here. It is endangered.
Okay - looked it up under mussel and evidently this mussel has only been found right around MECK and UNION here in NC. (Other areas in SC and GA) How interesting. Never have seen it and grew playing in creeks and hanging out around the Catawba River.

From what I could ascertain, looks like they hardly exist anywhere these days.

Carolina Heelsplitter in North Carolina (http://www.fws.gov/nc-es/mussel/carolheel.html - broken link)
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Old 04-03-2009, 09:18 PM
 
Location: Some got six month some got one solid. But me and my buddies all got lifetime here
4,551 posts, read 9,290,687 times
Reputation: 2121
When we first moved down here I was nuts over everything that wasn't New Jersey. Even though I'm a satellite radio listener I used to love scrolling down the FM band...look how many country stations are here as opposed to none back home. Radio ads for places in Greensboro? For a transplant that's pretty nifty. I'd watch the weather on the evening news and man...New Jersey was alllllll the way on the upper right of the weather map.

Go out to eat...I've never had pulled pork before, I don't think I've ever seen it on a menu, but I'm gonna give it a whirl and boy is it tasty.

Open up the sports page and I'm getting hit with nascar blazing on the front as opposed to the Rangers, Yankees or Giants. Well this is a switch but still a pretty cool one.

For the most part New Jerseyans...well...we're a great bunch of people. The way southern people express themselves is different yet still exuding a lot of warmth and kindness (unless some red head goes off on you and is ready to meet you at your house with a road map back to I-95 ).

After years of seeing the lower Manhattan skyline on the way to and from work I'm now hit with a lesser skyline, yet majestic in it's own way.

Madison Square Garden, Yankee Stadium, the Meadowlands Arena and Giants Stadium are replaced with a behemoth of a race track...something that given where I live I see every time I hit the gas in my SUV. I've never seen anything like this before..holy **** <pick your favorite four letter word, you kinda have two to choose from>

Then I quickly hated everything about it. Hated the skyline, hated the radio stations, hated seeing New Jersey way up on a weather map, hated the whole damn thing (except the track...that thing is really cool). As it turns out I hated everything not because it was something evil, but it was a hate based on the resentment I had grown to love the things that were more distinctly southern. How dare you sway me away my home state, a state that I loved and fiercely defended?

Why...I'll show you!!! I'll pack up, leave and head back home!!!! That'll show all of you!!!! <shakes fist>

Turns out the southern culture was still unique enough for me to still want to come back to. Which we did. In the end I found that I didn't want the same old, and that Carolina offered something different that went beyond retail and fast food chains. To me the culture is still there to an extent, but I'll believe anyone else over my own judgement any ol' day. I wasn't here when it was more decidedly southern than what it is now.
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Old 04-03-2009, 09:28 PM
 
Location: Indian Trail near S. Charlotte
210 posts, read 446,169 times
Reputation: 117
Quote:
Quote:
Originally Posted by anifani821 View Post
Thank you, NCN. I was feeling that I should not have written it cause it seems what I wrote is being misunderstood. I guess only a Southerner would understand what it means to be a Southerner, LOL. What many people think means "Southerner" is often based on stereotypes. Of course, some of the stereotypes are based on fact, LOL.

Southerners, whether good old boys or white collar professionals, are a very romantic bunch. We love our oral tradition and our history. We love the quirkiness of our communities and the people whose eccentricities make those communities colorful. It seems to me that in many areas, we have lost the ability to revel in eccentric behaviors and instead, people are quick to disparage and quick to sue, LOL. If you don't like your neighbor's actions, call the police! Sue 'em! Just seems to me there is a lack of tolerance, wh/ once was the hallmark of being Southern.
I just want you to know that not ALL Southern quirks and traditions are going to pass by. My little neighbor is growing up on his family's 7th generational farm. Last summer, we were all swimming in the evening in my neighborhood pool, and this then 6 year old boy proceeded to hold a very interesting conversation with one of the transplanted neighbors.

David asked if she drank soy milk, and when she said yes, he told her she was probably drinking milk made from his Dad's soybeans. He then asked her if she had ever seen a dead skunk up close. No, she said. He told her about the recent picture they took of him holding the dead skunk by the tail. Then he very graciously asked her if she knew that an otter was one of the fastest swimmers in the wild. Again no, but she said he knew some very interesting information. The little one just beamed. He told her that if he could get some good beaver teeth, she would be welcome to see them, because beavers have some of the longest sharpest teeth known. This women acted very interested, and I'm sure she now has some very riveting stories to tell her friends!

This little one has quite the accent, an intense interest in Davy Crockett and Daniel Boone, and loves anything to do with Indians, all of which had ties with the area in the mountains near Winston-Salem. He is learning proper Southern etiquette. His mother is called Momma, I am Miss Kitty (not really, but you get the idea), and a man would be Mister Dan.

And just this evening, as I was walking into Papa John's for the Friday night pizza, a very nice 12 year old politely held the door open and wished me a good evening. Wow! A woman asked me directions the other day. When I was finished, she wished me a blessed day and went on. Another Wow. Of course, this is all in Winston, not Charlotte, but I want you to know that there is hope, and I really would like to see these small courtesies that are done here extend to the rest of the rushing non-caring nation.
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Old 04-03-2009, 09:40 PM
 
Location: Huntersville
1,852 posts, read 4,676,205 times
Reputation: 525
As Cubs said.. the issue isn't so much an idenity that people bring, but the city has to embrace it. Wburg, Savannah, Charleston, part of their charm is their history. Charlotte decided to become a banking center, and built a CITY in uptown. You mention NYC, and yes it has it's own vibe, but it is also it's own freaking country with it's size, but even then, it doesn't have one idenity, it has it's burroughs. Also Chi, SF and NY are much older cities. And what I mean is they were cities a long time ago, you are talking the 3 major ports for the US, until LA came along later. I think of Dallas, PHX, LA, some new cities that have grown and they have or are losing their idenity. Dallas aint so Cowboy as people think, I was quite disappointed when I moved there. Phoenix is new as well and has a deep SW flaire, but the city embraced it and built to it. It was a style of building which helped. Can't build too much "southern". But even then, then stuff built the last 10 years is generic at best. LA, outside of "hollywood" I think offers no culture to it's history. Charlotte has grown big in the last 25 years or so, so it means most of the people here haven't grown up here. Chicago and the others are big, but you have millions of people who grew up there. Unfortunatley turning back the time is tough, but I also never saw Charlotte, though older, as a historic city. I am not even are of any SIGNIFICANT historic district or historic buildings in the downtown. I mean look at the POS Polk building, they could restore it and use it and it just sits there, empty and tattered. Disappointing.
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Old 04-03-2009, 09:53 PM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,199,962 times
Reputation: 22375
RAGDOLL - precious story. Yes, Daniel Boone and Davy Crockett are still a "big deal" in this region. I can point out various places in western NC where Daniel Boone had encampments. It is rather fascinating.

I am glad to hear that you are seeing children who have been taught some etiquette and manners. Traditionally, kids here have been taught to always show respect to adults and I hope that will never change.

I surely hope these courtesies and civilities will always be a part of life here. I think it is easy to lose those traditions simply b/c the world is moving faster and faster. In a big city, people are often rushing to get to the next destination, and wrapped up in their own thoughts. I don't think people intend to be less courteous, but when we get in a hurry, we just don't take time to exchange pleasantries. I hope this Southern tradition won't get lost in the shuffle as Charlotte gets bigger. That would be such a shame.
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Old 04-03-2009, 10:03 PM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,199,962 times
Reputation: 22375
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianH1970 View Post
When we first moved down here I was nuts over everything that wasn't New Jersey. Even though I'm a satellite radio listener I used to love scrolling down the FM band...look how many country stations are here as opposed to none back home. Radio ads for places in Greensboro? For a transplant that's pretty nifty. I'd watch the weather on the evening news and man...New Jersey was alllllll the way on the upper right of the weather map.

Go out to eat...I've never had pulled pork before, I don't think I've ever seen it on a menu, but I'm gonna give it a whirl and boy is it tasty.

Open up the sports page and I'm getting hit with nascar blazing on the front as opposed to the Rangers, Yankees or Giants. Well this is a switch but still a pretty cool one.

For the most part New Jerseyans...well...we're a great bunch of people. The way southern people express themselves is different yet still exuding a lot of warmth and kindness (unless some red head goes off on you and is ready to meet you at your house with a road map back to I-95 ).

After years of seeing the lower Manhattan skyline on the way to and from work I'm now hit with a lesser skyline, yet majestic in it's own way.

Madison Square Garden, Yankee Stadium, the Meadowlands Arena and Giants Stadium are replaced with a behemoth of a race track...something that given where I live I see every time I hit the gas in my SUV. I've never seen anything like this before..holy **** <pick your favorite four letter word, you kinda have two to choose from>

Then I quickly hated everything about it. Hated the skyline, hated the radio stations, hated seeing New Jersey way up on a weather map, hated the whole damn thing (except the track...that thing is really cool). As it turns out I hated everything not because it was something evil, but it was a hate based on the resentment I had grown to love the things that were more distinctly southern. How dare you sway me away my home state, a state that I loved and fiercely defended?

Why...I'll show you!!! I'll pack up, leave and head back home!!!! That'll show all of you!!!! <shakes fist>

Turns out the southern culture was still unique enough for me to still want to come back to. Which we did. In the end I found that I didn't want the same old, and that Carolina offered something different that went beyond retail and fast food chains. To me the culture is still there to an extent, but I'll believe anyone else over my own judgement any ol' day. I wasn't here when it was more decidedly southern than what it is now.
Brian, thank you for that wonderful post. That makes me feel better. If you see things as Southern, then that is a great lens for me to look through (your eyes). The things you point out are definitely part of Southern culture.

And btw . . .I can't tell you enuff how glad I am that you turned that car around and came back to us here in NC. I love hearing about NJ, too. Still want to visit Cape May, LOL. And wish we could relocate even a small casino from AC to Charlotte . . .

Someone else's perspective helps bring things into better focus.

Now, have you been to a county fair yet? Or a campmeeting? Or been fishing w/ a cane pole off a river bank? Walked barefoot in mud? Slept outside on the porch cause it was just too darn hot inside? Picked cotton? Used an outhouse? Had a snort of some really good high proof white lightning?
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Old 04-04-2009, 12:21 AM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
22,007 posts, read 27,299,353 times
Reputation: 9034
Forgive me for rambling. I know I'm about to.

My Mendenhall line got to NC from PA about 1760. However, like the rest of my lines, they couldn't stay put & went to Georgia & later Ohio, & eventually Indiana, although some of the family did stay in what became Guilford County.

By the Revolutionary War, my ancestors were spread from Massachusetts to Georgia. That's what being a Midwesterner is all about (That & one immigrant grandparent.)

So I share some of the same 18th century ancestry & history with some of you, yankees & southerners alike.

It's a shame that so much of old Charlotte is gone. Unfortunately, you can never bring it back. The ties with the past are good. I lived for most of my life in the Philadelphia metro area which is full of 18th century architecture. It's the same type of architechure that is all through the MidAltantic, including Williamsburg.

The real digression seems to have come in a 5 year period in the mid 19th century.

I bought a foreclosure in Kings Mountain. It was a total mess. My neighbors don't give a rip where I moved from or what my accent is. The neighborhood eyesore is no more. I'm not done, & the landscaping will probably take me a couple of years, but they're just happy as clams.

I've had a local man working with me. He grew up in Lincoln County & some of our ancestors are documented in the same county in Georgia, during the Revolutionary War. Some of his family was in the same Union Army with some of my family. Then there's those sayings. He & I are nearly the same age & we use a lot of the same sayings that we learned from our mothers & grandmothers.

Of course there are differences. Differences are not a problem unless you want them to be.
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Old 04-04-2009, 05:53 AM
 
Location: Some got six month some got one solid. But me and my buddies all got lifetime here
4,551 posts, read 9,290,687 times
Reputation: 2121
Quote:
Originally Posted by anifani821 View Post
Brian, thank you for that wonderful post. That makes me feel better. If you see things as Southern, then that is a great lens for me to look through (your eyes). The things you point out are definitely part of Southern culture.

And btw . . .I can't tell you enuff how glad I am that you turned that car around and came back to us here in NC. I love hearing about NJ, too. Still want to visit Cape May, LOL. And wish we could relocate even a small casino from AC to Charlotte . . .

Someone else's perspective helps bring things into better focus.

Now, have you been to a county fair yet? Or a campmeeting? Or been fishing w/ a cane pole off a river bank? Walked barefoot in mud? Slept outside on the porch cause it was just too darn hot inside? Picked cotton? Used an outhouse? Had a snort of some really good high proof white lightning?
It's all perspective. When you live in one region for so long, the cultural differences hit you a little more square in the face when you start over in another region. I spent a lot of time separating what felt like home and what didn't, and it was a sizable little list. I still tend to think that it goes back to something I used to say: if you pack 50 northerners into a the house of a southerner, within an hour the Yankee game will be on the TV, you'll hear conversations about Tony Soprano being a sort of demi-god, and reminiscing about Mark Messier holding up the Stanley Cup (which I find myself doing more and more as this season winds down ). It won't feel like your home before long.

That's not to say I don't see things that to my eyes at least appear to be more uniquely northern (generic strip malls would be the very first thing that comes to mind). But I do see things that are either distinctly southern OR match what my perception of the south is. I see areas driving along Odell School Road on the way to visiting DEI...wide open fields...the homes...rugged looking outdoorsmen riding horses...a handmade sign for a weekly rodeo. I see places here that have an aura of, I don't know, southern serenity, that I've never seen up north. Not saying that magnetic, serene places don't exist back home and not that they're lacking, but something's still uniquely different.

Things that out of nowhere make you go, "man, I'm really far away from home".

I think the problem always lies in looking back at what once was and resenting what you left or what was taken away. It's like visiting a place that you haven't seen in 30 years. It brings back all these wonderful memories but also that bit of sadness that clouds your vision some. You find that it's no longer the same place that you remembered it to be. I can't identify with that down here, but my perception tells me that there's still something unique here that I haven't seen in other places.

If a concert festival field full of mud with portojohns is a uniquely southern experience...I've been to 4 day camping and music festivals. Hit one of those and you become an expert at both.
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Old 04-04-2009, 06:23 AM
 
285 posts, read 713,502 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chicagocubs View Post
it's a type of mussel that grows in creek beds here. It is endangered.
My son knows where there are lots of them
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