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Old 04-17-2009, 05:54 PM
 
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I think Most people are saying its not urban because the entire city is not like maybe uptown. like in NYC, london, in majority of there nieghborhodds in the suburbs you can walk to restuarants, retail stores grocery stores catch trains throught the suburbs. Thats true urbaninity where you are not relied on having to have a car You cant be considered urban if only your downtown is urban the entire city as a whole has to be urban to be considered that . Charlotte just has pockets of urban areas everyone in charlotte cant say they live in areas like up town thats walkable . Like people in NYC can say
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Old 04-18-2009, 08:08 AM
 
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I live in Cornelius. I can walk to grocery stores, restruarnts, bars, doctors offices. I don't really need a car unless I want to go on a trip. I guess we are really urban in Cornelius?
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Old 04-18-2009, 08:17 AM
 
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Why do we say that Charlotte is "urban for N.C." or Charlotte is "urban for the south"? Would Charlotte be labeled differently if it were in Ohio, California, or Vermont? Or, are using the references of N.C. or south just another sign of southern bias or an indication of an inferiority complex by southerners that use the references? Are the rules for urbanization different in N.C. or the south than the other part of the world? Again, what a stupid topic!
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Old 04-18-2009, 08:39 AM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC
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Vindaloo, yes, Charlotte would be labeled differently if it were elsewhere. You don't see true "northern" urban areas down here because that is not the way that this area was settled. The (primarily) English that arrived here back in the day came from northern England or Scotland/ Ireland where things are primarily agriculture- based. There are few truly urban areas in northern England, either, other than in Manchester or maybe Birmingham. The people who settled here, however, created farms and raised crops and animals. Northern parts of this country were primarily settled by immigrants and people that worked in factories that were very poor and did not have the transportation to travel very far. The cities there are larger and more urban because the land was too expensive. Land was used to create more factories or stores, or other forms of retail. Houses were (are) very close together. I tried to post a photo of my childhood home in Chicago as an example, could not get it to work. There is literally only enough room for one person to walk single-file between the houses. And, that was considered to be "upscale", the poorer areas did not have that much room. THAT is the "northern" definition of urban. Charlotte...and even Cornelius...have a different form of urban. London's urban is different from Chicago's...go to Burnt Oak in London and you have a completely different form of urban than Kensington. Both technically urban, but, one a lot more upscale than the other. So, to answer your question, yes...there is a difference. Not necessarily BAD, just different.
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Old 04-18-2009, 10:25 AM
 
Location: metro ATL
8,190 posts, read 12,273,738 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vindaloo View Post
Why do we say that Charlotte is "urban for N.C." or Charlotte is "urban for the south"? Would Charlotte be labeled differently if it were in Ohio, California, or Vermont? Or, are using the references of N.C. or south just another sign of southern bias or an indication of an inferiority complex by southerners that use the references? Are the rules for urbanization different in N.C. or the south than the other part of the world? Again, what a stupid topic!
In this case it's valid. Charlotte is a Sunbelt city that experienced its boom after the age of the automobile; thus it is more sprawled out and has a less historic, compact urban core than cities that developed pre-WWII and these cities are much more concentrated in the Northeast and Midwest. There will be a significant difference in the urban fabric of Charlotte and any of its Midwestern and Northeastern peer cities.
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Old 04-18-2009, 11:30 AM
 
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Originally Posted by the 7 oh 4 View Post
Wrong. Charlotte is Urban for this area of the country. You live in the burbs...right. Of course that is not Urban.

I live Uptown in 4th Ward and can walk to many restaurants, night clubs, pharmacies, grocery stores, some shopping (getting a little better), the Blumenthal Perfoming Arts Center, an Indoor Acquatic Center, an Indoor water park, some Museums & more...this is not NY...but YES...Charlotte is Urban for NC.

We don't want to be compared to London or NY...have lived in Manhattan on the Upper East Side with FREE rent and saw NOTHING special about NY. It is not for everyone...just like Charlotte is not for everyone.
Well Said, 7oh4, Well said! The way I see things, Charlotte offers me everything that I want, and I like that! I'm not that preoccupied with whether or not Charlotte is like Atlanta or New York or L.A. For the most part, what Charlotte doesn't have right now, it will eventually have, b/c as long as it continues to grow, it will get to that point!
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Old 04-20-2009, 11:01 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Akhenaton06 View Post
In this case it's valid. Charlotte is a Sunbelt city that experienced its boom after the age of the automobile; thus it is more sprawled out and has a less historic, compact urban core than cities that developed pre-WWII and these cities are much more concentrated in the Northeast and Midwest. There will be a significant difference in the urban fabric of Charlotte and any of its Midwestern and Northeastern peer cities.
If this is the case, then perhaps Charlotte could be a model for a different type of urban. I remember someone in the forum pointed out the difference in urban vs urbanized. I can't remeber what the difference is. One is concerned with the population in a sqare mile of at least 1000 people. The other is more concerned with the amount of used land and buildings of the sort, I think.

Following this thought I would like to make a comparison of Charlotte to Indianapolis and Atlanta. I see Charlotte as having different districts like Atlanta. These districts being Southpark, University City, Ballantyne, as well as Uptown. These districts is how the suburban and automobile sprawl in Charlotte will be similiar to Atlanta. Indianapolis has a significant urban core but is also spread out. I think Charlotte's urban core will get bigger like Indianapolis.

This thread is debating on the status of Charlotte as being an "urban" city and what type of urban it is. If you believe this to be a stupid topic don't post. But there may be others, like myself, who really take pride in this city and want to see what other fellow Charlotteans think so they can do something about it.
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Old 04-20-2009, 11:41 AM
 
Location: State of Being
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Well, Charlotte in totality - burbs as well as city core - is still evolving. Nothing wrong w/ questioning or analyzing that development. Maybe we are gonna be like Paris. Who knows? :-)
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Old 04-20-2009, 06:10 PM
 
1,303 posts, read 1,717,575 times
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Originally Posted by vindaloo View Post
I live in Cornelius. I can walk to grocery stores, restruarnts, bars, doctors offices. I don't really need a car unless I want to go on a trip. I guess we are really urban in Cornelius?

Thats just one part Is the entire city urban ???
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Old 04-20-2009, 06:51 PM
 
Location: Charlotte
3 posts, read 9,017 times
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If you can't spend an entire day downtown = not urban. There isn't enough shopping, dining and entertainment, etc. downtown to not get bored in less than a few hours. The Epicentre is only a small step. There's no street life downtown. In that regard, Asheville is much more urban than Charlotte.
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