U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > North Carolina > Charlotte
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 04-16-2009, 11:34 AM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
21,981 posts, read 27,263,822 times
Reputation: 9008

Advertisements

A lot of newcomers to the Charlotte area are coming from colder climates and/or are unfamiliar with planting in clay. I'm completely redoing a landscape, which will take me 2 or 3 years. I've been gardening in planting zone 7, in clay, so no big deal, but I realize that this could be daunting, so what are some constructive tips for newcomers?

I'm doing this myself with help from one person, & I'm not rushing it.

I've started off with a large azalea, a large camelia & a grouping of 3 small azaleas. Now I'm adding a few perennials. For this year I'm using some gerbera daisies Gerbera - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia & African daisies Osteospermum - The African Daisy, Cape Daisy, Spaanse Margriet to fill space. I've had great luck with them in the past & they make a good showing.

At the back of the lot I'm going to put in shrub roses (think heirloom roses) They are much easier to deal with than tea roses.

What can you suggest to the newcomers to help them landscape a lot or make an existing landscape their own?
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-16-2009, 11:50 AM
 
210 posts, read 541,239 times
Reputation: 79
Southern Living Garden Book -- only plants that will grow here, with better listing of zones (covers heat and cool, as opposed to numbered zones, which can tell you a plant can survive winter but not necessarily whether it will survive heat of summer).

Gardenias can be nice here if you find a hardy variety & enrich the soil enough to make it happy. I'm trying a bunch of bulbs (crinums, tuberose, gladiolas) just to see what will do okay, as well as some heirloom roses. (Southbound, have you looked at this site? They were great for me: The Antique Rose Emporium).

Daylilies are very nice for landscaping here, seem to survive drought well once established & they're a classic summer flower. I like azaleas, too, but some varieties are a little overused in my opinion. Just say no to Bradford pears. For trees, there are so many nice native trees (oaks, dogwoods, disease resistant elms) that I don't see much need to plant potentially invasive trees like Thujas (Green Giant), Paulownia (Princess Tree), etc.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-16-2009, 12:03 PM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
21,981 posts, read 27,263,822 times
Reputation: 9008
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plan R View Post
Southern Living Garden Book -- only plants that will grow here, with better listing of zones (covers heat and cool, as opposed to numbered zones, which can tell you a plant can survive winter but not necessarily whether it will survive heat of summer).

Gardenias can be nice here if you find a hardy variety & enrich the soil enough to make it happy. I'm trying a bunch of bulbs (crinums, tuberose, gladiolas) just to see what will do okay, as well as some heirloom roses. (Southbound, have you looked at this site? They were great for me: The Antique Rose Emporium).

Daylilies are very nice for landscaping here, seem to survive drought well once established & they're a classic summer flower. I like azaleas, too, but some varieties are a little overused in my opinion. Just say no to Bradford pears. For trees, there are so many nice native trees (oaks, dogwoods, disease resistant elms) that I don't see much need to plant potentially invasive trees like Thujas (Green Giant), Paulownia (Princess Tree), etc.
Plan R I've ordered from Heirloom Roses Roses, Rose Bushes, Rose Gardening, Rose Plants in the past. I never had a problem with them. I did get a few locally, & that will do for this spring. I'll mail order in the fall or next spring.

Right now I'm clearing out stuff, including a lot of kudzu, so I have no intention of completing the project this spring.

LOL, when my family moved to South Jersey in the 60s, we learned about the heat of summer frying certain plants, like pansies. I wouldn't give you a plug nickel for a bradford pear. I've seen those break or at least large limbs break off during high winds too many times.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-16-2009, 02:13 PM
 
Location: East Bay
697 posts, read 1,155,836 times
Reputation: 1377
Be sure to check out Growers Outlet on South Boulevard. The selection of trees and plants is mind boggling! Very good prices.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-16-2009, 03:18 PM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,160,016 times
Reputation: 22373
I guess my suggestion would be to start off w/ foundation plants. If your landscaping will handle them, azaleas are always a good choice (well, almost always). I also like euonymous for the back of the house. Various holly varieties grow well here as do nandinas. I have heard nandina disparaged in the past, but I love them - and like to use their red berries in the Fall to decorate with.

I would suggest butterfly bushes if you have some areas that are informal. And every home needs some forsythia somewhere - just to welcome the Spring!

Crepe Myrtle do well here. I have had Bradford Pear break apart so I no longer use them. Dogwood are native and do extremely well here. You can get pink, red or white. Hydrangea are good here, too, just make sure you get the right variety to weather the winter (there are many).

For flowers, I like perennials b/c I can propagate them. So that is nearly limitless as to selection. I have echinacea, columbine, coreopsis, salvia, dianthus right now. Oh - and mums. Lots of mums.

I love lilies so I have many varieties. And in places where I can use height, I have Iris.

I have always had peonies, but never have figured out where to put one here. But I do highly recommend them - they are so beautiful and bloom for a long time.

Tulip trees. Gotta get a tulip tree - or any one of the many varieties of magnolia.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-16-2009, 04:01 PM
 
2,560 posts, read 6,077,444 times
Reputation: 1063
Quote:
Originally Posted by PlainWhite View Post
Be sure to check out Growers Outlet on South Boulevard. The selection of trees and plants is mind boggling! Very good prices.
I was up thier yesterday and walked out with nothing. Wal Mart's ferns are the cheapest and boy are they nice, $7.88.
Growers $12.50
Lowe's $9.99
Depot $12 I believe

I just bought a bunch of plants from Lowe's.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-16-2009, 04:48 PM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,160,016 times
Reputation: 22373
Quote:
Originally Posted by nascarnancy View Post
I was up thier yesterday and walked out with nothing. Wal Mart's ferns are the cheapest and boy are they nice, $7.88.
Growers $12.50
Lowe's $9.99
Depot $12 I believe

I just bought a bunch of plants from Lowe's.
Thanx for the heads up on the ferns!!!
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-16-2009, 05:01 PM
 
Location: Chattanooga, TN
616 posts, read 1,568,105 times
Reputation: 303
Raised beds, or at least raise the area where you plant, avoid the situation where you dig a big hole in the clay and fill it with good soil and then plant. The hole becomes a bathtub and your plant can drown (no oxygen due to the roots sitting in the "bathtub" water)

Till organic material into your "soil" (ha!)

I am having success with ornamental grasses, sedums, rosa rugosa and shrub roses, rudibeckia, coreopsis, butterfly bushes, lilac, monarda (bee balm), liriope, crape myrtles, azaleas, nandina, day lilies, various low growing juniper type evergreens (groundcover), camellias, loropetalum, hostas, St John's Wort, Ajuga (Choc Chip), creeping jenny, clematis, eunymous (burning bushes) ....

The foundation shrubs were already planted when we bought this house. I didn't want to deal with yanking them out so I'm more or less working my way around them.

My goal is to have as many plants as possible that are xeric, once established. Amazing how many plants, when in the right place and the right soil and mulched well, require little additional watering or fussing. Although, I do try to get out and talk to each of them at least a few times a week.

Whew.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-16-2009, 05:52 PM
 
2,560 posts, read 6,077,444 times
Reputation: 1063
Quote:
Originally Posted by anifani821 View Post
Thanx for the heads up on the ferns!!!
You are so welcome. I have 3 hanging from the front porch, I just love them.

Also bought Dear Labby a little swimming pool today. He has already got to play in it today, of course he had to chew on it too. He's a lab all right.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-16-2009, 06:00 PM
 
2,560 posts, read 6,077,444 times
Reputation: 1063
Quote:
Originally Posted by abcornwell View Post
Raised beds, or at least raise the area where you plant, avoid the situation where you dig a big hole in the clay and fill it with good soil and then plant. The hole becomes a bathtub and your plant can drown (no oxygen due to the roots sitting in the "bathtub" water)

Till organic material into your "soil" (ha!)

I am having success with ornamental grasses, sedums, rosa rugosa and shrub roses, rudibeckia, coreopsis, butterfly bushes, lilac, monarda (bee balm), liriope, crape myrtles, azaleas, nandina, day lilies, various low growing juniper type evergreens (groundcover), camellias, loropetalum, hostas, St John's Wort, Ajuga (Choc Chip), creeping jenny, clematis, eunymous (burning bushes) ....

The foundation shrubs were already planted when we bought this house. I didn't want to deal with yanking them out so I'm more or less working my way around them.

My goal is to have as many plants as possible that are xeric, once established. Amazing how many plants, when in the right place and the right soil and mulched well, require little additional watering or fussing. Although, I do try to get out and talk to each of them at least a few times a week.

Whew.
I love a variety of plants in my garden. Last spring I planted 5 Lily of the Nile in front of our garage. So today I bought another type of lily that requires partial sun to plant in between the others. On the island in the front lawn I bought 3 different types of lily's that like full sun. I am going to put them in 3 groups using one of each. Now I have 5 types of lily's, should be pretty and they'll come back next spring. Bought some extra impatients for the beds too.

I like this thred, love gardening but coming from So Cal, it is different and I feel like I did have to somewhat start over.
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > North Carolina > Charlotte
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top