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Old 07-27-2009, 03:50 PM
NCN NCN started this thread
 
Location: NC/SC Border Patrol
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Why are so many houses for sale on the street coming into Monroe from Highways 75 and 84. They made me want to go house shopping. I love those old homes.
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Old 07-27-2009, 06:45 PM
 
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There are plans to build a new high traffic road from Monroe linking back towards charlotte. I would be 100% sure that none of these homes for sale will be affected. Seeing alot of for sale homes in one location indicates a problem...
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Old 07-28-2009, 02:07 PM
 
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The hight traffic road is the Monroe bypass connector and it is going on the Secrest Short Cut Rd side od US 74. As an owner of one of the old historic homes it the downtown historic Monroe I can truthfully say that most homes were purchased, like we did, restored and ready for resale. There were some that I belive in that area were actually rentals. Your best bet would be to get on of the local relators that specialize in those old homes to research it for you if you are really interested. There are some great deals on some of them right now, from fully restored to the "handyman specials". Try to buy something like that in Charlotte and you will be paying up to 3X more.
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Old 07-28-2009, 05:03 PM
 
Location: Noth Caccalacca
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Hi NCN, I found this article from the June 26th Union County Weekly and it's in the archives which cannot be linked like newer articles. It was written by Brian Carlton. I believe it will give you some insight as to why there are more houses for sale than is usually the case. Some of these houses are absolute gems and can never be duplicated. Our former collegue "Judy" lives in the area. She has a beautiful home! It's a shame!

Brian Wilson plans to move his family out of Monroe’s Historic District. But the usual suspects – a job transfer, high property taxes – aren’t to blame. The family’s packing up because earlier this month, a man broke into their Houston Street home at 4 a.m. and pulled a gun on Wilson’s wife.

No one was injured, but for the family, it was the final straw. Four years ago, he and his wife witnessed a stabbing in their front yard. “We never really felt all that safe, but in the last two to three years the situation has deteriorated,” said Wilson, one of more than 80 unhappy residents who packed the Monroe Library’s Griffin Room on June 20 to express their concerns at a meeting with police and city officials. Other residents shared stories about hearing gunfire, which they jokingly called “fireworks,” and being chased down the street by the neighborhood’s juveniles and harassed in their own yards by people they called drug dealers and thugs.

But Monroe Police Chief Debra Duncan and Mayor Bobby Kilgore told residents there’s not much more they can do without hiking taxes to hire more officers. Last year, the department’s 81 officers answered 45,000 calls, Duncan said.

Crime in the district
An estimated 1,200 people call the Historic District home. According to police statistics, since 2007 there have been five murders, three armed robberies, two shootings and two home invasions in the area. So far this year, there have been six such incidents, including three armed robberies, two murders and a home invasion. “These are our homes that we are raising our families in, the communities we want to feel safe in,” said Historic District Neighborhood Watch leader Jeff Allwine, who helped organize the meeting. Allwine, who took over the job on Saturday from another exasperated couple, said the issue is bigger than police presence. “Until either the low-income housing is not part of the makeup of the neighborhood, or the landlords are held accountable for the people they rent to, then I don’t see much improvement, no matter what we do,” he said. He said most suspects in Historic District crimes live in the rental units and low-income housing on streets such as Tallyrand Avenue and Maurice Street. From December 2000 to December 2006, police records show 41 major complaints from the rental units, including six cases of drug possession, six cases of breaking and entering, and one motor vehicle theft. Duncan said she recognizes the residents’ concerns but said she only has so many officers. “We do care and I care. We don’t come out (and listen) just to placate,” she said. Kilgore explained that adding more patrol officers most likely means raising taxes. “Nobody wants to hear it, but it’s the truth,” he said. “If you want more police officers, then you might (have) a tax hike.” Allwine and other residents said they understand the staffing issues and recognize that they chose to live behind low-income housing. He said he came to the meeting hoping for solutions, but residents’ rancor overwhelmed the discussion. However, earlier this month the Neighborhood Watch program held a
yard sale and raised $300. Allwine plans to use that money to put up Neighborhood Watch signs in the area. He also hopes to get volunteer block captains who will monitor the district and meet with the captains, police, city council and local church leaders every few months.

“The bottom line is we all care about our city, our district, our neighbors and our families,” Allwine said. “I know how frustrated and upset I am as a resident about the crime in our small city. I could only imagine how it affects everyone from the chief down on a daily basis.”
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Old 07-28-2009, 06:02 PM
 
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Do not confuse Maurice street with the gems on 75. The section(Houston St and part of Talleyrand) with the problems is close to public housing and will always be the "hood". A duck will always be a duck regardless of what you call it. As the previous poster mentioned over 1200 people call the Historic District Home and it covers a large area. I have owned a property in the Historic District for 10 years and have not had any problems. The area has improved a lot since I bought in. Most of the residents in my neighborhood have spent a lot of money in renovations(me included). The view from my home is awesome. This whole issue sounds like an excuse to raise taxes. The homes closer to 84 and 75 are in a better area and not near the projects. I would like to see a map of exactly which part of the Historic District has had problems. Sincerely doubt all 45,000 calls were to the Historic District. If the people on Maurice Street want to clean up, they need to get rid of public housing. Unfortunately creative journalism does not help the neighborhood and some owners will get stuck as involuntary landlords until the masses learn that the Historic district makes up a large area.

Also, landlords in the area would like for the City of Monroe to maintain an online database of all criminal court cases, including juveniles so that we can refrain from renting to problem individuals. Criminal background checks only pick up on convictions and this would help considerably.
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Old 07-29-2009, 06:35 AM
NCN NCN started this thread
 
Location: NC/SC Border Patrol
21,135 posts, read 21,826,625 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheEmissary View Post
Hi NCN, I found this article from the June 26th Union County Weekly and it's in the archives which cannot be linked like newer articles. It was written by Brian Carlton. I believe it will give you some insight as to why there are more houses for sale than is usually the case. Some of these houses are absolute gems and can never be duplicated. Our former collegue "Judy" lives in the area. She has a beautiful home! It's a shame!

Brian Wilson plans to move his family out of Monroe’s Historic District. But the usual suspects – a job transfer, high property taxes – aren’t to blame. The family’s packing up because earlier this month, a man broke into their Houston Street home at 4 a.m. and pulled a gun on Wilson’s wife.

No one was injured, but for the family, it was the final straw. Four years ago, he and his wife witnessed a stabbing in their front yard. “We never really felt all that safe, but in the last two to three years the situation has deteriorated,” said Wilson, one of more than 80 unhappy residents who packed the Monroe Library’s Griffin Room on June 20 to express their concerns at a meeting with police and city officials. Other residents shared stories about hearing gunfire, which they jokingly called “fireworks,” and being chased down the street by the neighborhood’s juveniles and harassed in their own yards by people they called drug dealers and thugs.

But Monroe Police Chief Debra Duncan and Mayor Bobby Kilgore told residents there’s not much more they can do without hiking taxes to hire more officers. Last year, the department’s 81 officers answered 45,000 calls, Duncan said.

Crime in the district
An estimated 1,200 people call the Historic District home. According to police statistics, since 2007 there have been five murders, three armed robberies, two shootings and two home invasions in the area. So far this year, there have been six such incidents, including three armed robberies, two murders and a home invasion. “These are our homes that we are raising our families in, the communities we want to feel safe in,” said Historic District Neighborhood Watch leader Jeff Allwine, who helped organize the meeting. Allwine, who took over the job on Saturday from another exasperated couple, said the issue is bigger than police presence. “Until either the low-income housing is not part of the makeup of the neighborhood, or the landlords are held accountable for the people they rent to, then I don’t see much improvement, no matter what we do,” he said. He said most suspects in Historic District crimes live in the rental units and low-income housing on streets such as Tallyrand Avenue and Maurice Street. From December 2000 to December 2006, police records show 41 major complaints from the rental units, including six cases of drug possession, six cases of breaking and entering, and one motor vehicle theft. Duncan said she recognizes the residents’ concerns but said she only has so many officers. “We do care and I care. We don’t come out (and listen) just to placate,” she said. Kilgore explained that adding more patrol officers most likely means raising taxes. “Nobody wants to hear it, but it’s the truth,” he said. “If you want more police officers, then you might (have) a tax hike.” Allwine and other residents said they understand the staffing issues and recognize that they chose to live behind low-income housing. He said he came to the meeting hoping for solutions, but residents’ rancor overwhelmed the discussion. However, earlier this month the Neighborhood Watch program held a
yard sale and raised $300. Allwine plans to use that money to put up Neighborhood Watch signs in the area. He also hopes to get volunteer block captains who will monitor the district and meet with the captains, police, city council and local church leaders every few months.

“The bottom line is we all care about our city, our district, our neighbors and our families,” Allwine said. “I know how frustrated and upset I am as a resident about the crime in our small city. I could only imagine how it affects everyone from the chief down on a daily basis.”
Thanks, Mr. Em. I saw the for sale signs and just wondered. I love this area of Monroe. Looks like it would be a good time to go home shopping. I was wondering if they were selling as a block type thing hoping to get a big buyer for a shopping center, hotel, etc. I wouldn't want these homes to be torn down, but looks like they might some day be if Monroe doesn't get rid of some of the crime. That report is just unacceptable for those of us who just ride through.

I think a "get tough on crime" would be more useful than more police. You cannot let the criminals win the fight. Concentrate on one area of town until it is clean, etc. And prosecute with the residents putting pressure on the courts by publishing which judges are not doing their jobs. We are doing all we can just sounds like an excuse. I don't believe in excuses. Get on the job and get it done.
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Old 07-29-2009, 11:23 AM
 
Location: Noth Caccalacca
5,553 posts, read 6,669,343 times
Reputation: 4838
Quote:
Originally Posted by NCN View Post
Thanks, Mr. Em. I saw the for sale signs and just wondered. I love this area of Monroe. Looks like it would be a good time to go home shopping. I was wondering if they were selling as a block type thing hoping to get a big buyer for a shopping center, hotel, etc. I wouldn't want these homes to be torn down, but looks like they might some day be if Monroe doesn't get rid of some of the crime. That report is just unacceptable for those of us who just ride through.

I think a "get tough on crime" would be more useful than more police. You cannot let the criminals win the fight. Concentrate on one area of town until it is clean, etc. And prosecute with the residents putting pressure on the courts by publishing which judges are not doing their jobs. We are doing all we can just sounds like an excuse. I don't believe in excuses. Get on the job and get it done.
Maybe the Sheriff might pay more attention if the "Neighborhood Watch" put up some signs with a picture of a gun and their new motto "Slugs for Thugs!!"
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Old 08-13-2009, 05:45 PM
 
43 posts, read 101,137 times
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Again, Maurice street is several miles away from the homes on 75 and 84. That is one reason why they are worth more and have appreciated over the years. The Historic District is very large geographically and population wise. As the article mentions the problem is coming from public housing. Maurice Street has always been in the hood. If they want to see an improvement then tear down the public housing. The folks that bought into an area that has always been the ghetto should not bring down the rest of the community, because they want to bring in more tax $$$. If you don't like crime then don't buy a house within walking distance of public housing. Also, don't confuse public housing with private landlords. The government does not care how much scum they are maintaining. A private landlord has an investment to protect.
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