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Old 11-12-2009, 04:56 PM
 
Location: East Lansing, MI
8,807 posts, read 7,971,800 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rubber_factory View Post
Yeah I also noticed the other day that Paula Deen's shrimp and grits recipe is a little... um.. not-how-you-really-do-it.
Tyler Florence's shrimp and grits recipe is fantastic, though. I believe he's from SC, originally.
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Old 11-13-2009, 11:21 AM
 
22,769 posts, read 26,222,576 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anifani821 View Post
Just curious - do you put sausage in yours?
not always. when I do, I use andouille. I hear bacon is good but I have not tried it.

Last edited by le roi; 11-13-2009 at 11:46 AM..
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Old 11-13-2009, 11:30 AM
 
22,769 posts, read 26,222,576 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hooligan View Post
Tyler Florence's shrimp and grits recipe is fantastic, though. I believe he's from SC, originally.

hooligan,

I agree, his is good.

my grandparents would always explain to me that there is a certain mindset to the whole process of "breakfast shrimp" - you don't waste ingredients. You use the grease from the ham to make your roux, and you use the heads and shells of the shrimp to make your stock. They made it very simple, mostly flavored with garlic, salt, and pepper. No peppers, onions, shallots, etc.
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Old 10-02-2018, 11:34 AM
 
Location: Temple Terrace, fla
174 posts, read 168,653 times
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I wish someone had described WHAT it is, not just that it isn't here. Try??
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Old 10-02-2018, 11:42 AM
 
6,800 posts, read 4,447,386 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by debnova View Post
I wish someone had described WHAT it is, not just that it isn't here. Try??
What is "it"? Chicken Bog?

"Chicken bog is a pilaf dish made of rice and chicken. It can include onion, spices, and sometimes sausage. A whole chicken is boiled until tender (with the sausage, onion, and spices, if included), then the rice is added and cooked until it absorbs all the liquid. Cooks often pick the bones and other inedible parts out of the pot and discard them before adding the rice to the meat and other ingredients. However, some cooks leave it all in for the diners to pick out as they eat, similar to many Caribbean meat and rice dishes. It is called Chicken "bog" because the chicken gets bogged down in the rice.

Loris, South Carolina celebrates an annual festival called the "Loris Bog-Off". Chicken bog is made different ways in different places, but it is perhaps found most often in the Pee Dee and Lowcountry regions of South Carolina."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicken_bog

https://discoversouthcarolina.com/ar...is-chicken-bog
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Old 10-02-2018, 10:06 PM
 
378 posts, read 227,107 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lumbollo View Post
I take a short cut in making it by cooking it in a pressurized Korean rice cooker. Some would say this isn't authentic, but I've spent decades cooking and figured out how to do it this way. It's a great dish that keeps well and makes great leftovers and packs well for take to work lunches.
Reading your initial comment lumbollo, others' insights, possible sushi-type rices and other listed ingredients, etc, chicken bog sure sounds extremely similar to chicken rice dishes prepared and served in several east Asian nations. And, my spouse used a rice cooker both there and now here alike.


Sure my spouse's similar dishes are unlikely to be authentic to whatever low country chicken bog may be with various recipes or wandering interpretations cited in this thread, others following family or purported celebrity cooks' (mis)interpretations, etc., but darn good eatin'. Now, we may need to seek out whatever chicken bog is or has likely evolved to be over the decades in various low country areas.
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Old 10-24-2018, 05:30 AM
 
Location: CHARLOTTE (REALLY)
164 posts, read 69,177 times
Reputation: 160
The recipes I've looked at online suggest that it's a spin on Deep South Jambalaya, which is a spin on rice-based Caribbean cuisine. My mother made both chicken bog (though that's not what we called it) and Jambalaya. Both are great.
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