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Old 02-01-2010, 10:15 AM
 
Location: Mooresville, NC
1,865 posts, read 4,783,488 times
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Back in NY, (in Putnam Cty where I lived) unless they said to expect 12"+ of snow, no one made a big deal about it. We were used to 6"-10" of snowfall as the "norm". You had a snow blower, shovels & ice melt as a staple in your garage or basement & firewood if you had a fireplace. They treated the roads before & after the snow fell & snow plows were out right away. We hardly ever had a problem with being able to get out for anything because it was a common occurrence & we were prepared for it. We'd get ice storms, usually in Jan., but not that often. And you're right, no one can drive in ice...foolish if you even try.

Snow in the south is less of the norm, it doesn't happen that often (well...the past 2 winters I've been told have been colder/snowier than usual). To stock pile salt & have x amount of snowplows available would not be cost effective for them to have. They do the best they can with the resources they have. I can understand why people run to the store to buy the basics.

 
Old 02-01-2010, 10:16 AM
 
Location: Mooresville, NC
1,865 posts, read 4,783,488 times
Reputation: 697
Quote:
Originally Posted by SunnyKayak View Post
part2 coming this weekend
of great...DH & DS just got tickets for the Bobcats game on Saturday
 
Old 02-01-2010, 10:24 AM
 
Location: S. Charlotte
1,511 posts, read 2,874,995 times
Reputation: 675
In Illinois if we had a blizzard coming or large amount of snow coming I'd go out and stock up on food basics. But I never saw the supermarkets as crazy as what I saw last Friday. And I went earlier in the day when there was still food on the shelves .

I don't fully understand this yet, except to agree that if the biggest threat here is ice, then that is a totally different phenomenon than the snow I'm used to. I'll drive on snow carefully but will avoid a completely iced up road unless absolutely necessary.
 
Old 02-01-2010, 10:25 AM
 
889 posts, read 2,845,884 times
Reputation: 343
Can it be too that for most,when your vehicle is not able to handle icy roads it's just better to stay off the roads and home untill roads are in better condition to travel thus "stocking" up on essentials is far easier for some then to not have to go out at all.It is not the "norm" here so yes it can be benefical to have your fridge stocked and ready to eat your way through a few days of being home and stuck in the house
 
Old 02-01-2010, 10:27 AM
 
Location: Right where I want to be.
4,507 posts, read 8,008,762 times
Reputation: 3332
For me it's just a bit of extra insurance. Did you see how many accidents there were on the roads this weekend? Buying bread and milk (and other necessities) in advance of a storm means I don't have to go out with all of the other people who think they can drive on ice. I don't have to worry about the parking lots being plowed or if the guy behind me is leaving enough space between my vehicle and his...just in case. It's prudent.


FWIW...I usually do my shopping on Friday anyway so I didn't do any 'storm shopping' this time....and if I had been 20 minutes later to Aldi's I wouldn't have gotten any milk.
 
Old 02-01-2010, 10:45 AM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,009,663 times
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Y'all have totally missed the point about why folks "stock up." I am surprised, tho, as I have mentioned it many times on this forum.

Power outages. Evidently, a huge number of people have moved here since the last big outage, which was in 2002. My power was off 2 x that winter - once for 3 days, once for 5 days.

Stop and think about this . . . if you are iced in, then you can't get out to buy anything . . and then the power goes off . . . you can't cook. And on top of it, the power outages are wide spread and so . . . even if you CAN get out, 1. the grocery store isn't open - no power! 2. the ATM is not working - no power! 3. The gas pumps are not working - no power!

The last big outage in NC saw over 1 million (yes - one million) folks out of power for longer than 3 days - some for a week.

So here we were . . . no heat in our houses . . . no way to fix a meal . . . that is why people get MILK AND BREAD. You can pour the milk over cereal and you can spread peanut butter on the bread for sandwiches! We have all known to do this for decades - I grew up this way! You always keep peanut butter, tuna fish and crackers, plenty of cereal on hand or run out to buy it. I also keep sardines (yes, we like them) . . . fruit, juice, applesauce . . . and I grab ice to put in my coolers, so we can keep lunch meat from spoiling.

As for snow shovels . . . the whole time I lived in this region, I never even SAW a snow shovel for sale. You know where I bought my first snow shovel? BOONE. I bought it in the 80s and brought it down the mountain, lol. Up to that point, including my childhood, we used a common shovel to get snow off. There were no "big box" DIY stores here! No one sold stuff like snowblowers and snow shovels cause there was not a demand for them.

To say Southerners laugh at folks for shoveling snow is ridiculous. Everyone has to deal with snow/ice removal on porches, steps and any other areas one has to walk if the temps stay under freezing. Why? Most of us have to take our dogs out to do their business even if we are not going to venture to our cars. We just use regular shovels if we don't have snow shovels.

I have been holding my breath over the potential power outages we could have had with this storm. And it isn't over yet. All it takes is about 1/4" of ice/sleet/freezing rain to paralyze this whole region b/c of power outages.

And it isn't just a matter of roads not being scraped . . . If we get much of an ice storm at all, trees and limbs break and fall, blocking roads and tearing down electrical lines. My electrical lines are buried, but even so - my electricity can go out b/c of outages in other areas of the grid.

If you haven't been without heat, hot water, the ability to cook for five or more days, you are probably not going to understand why folks are quick to try to prepare for that possibility. Imagine what a shock was for newcomers to this region in 2002 . . . especially those that had children to feed and keep warm. You quickly learn after an experience like that to have plenty of stuff stocked up, and if you don't have the money to do that (keep a pantry stocked) you can sure go buy a gallon or two of milk, cereal, bread and peanut butter . . . and survive til the power comes back on - or you can get out of your neighborhood to go to the grocery store (or both).
 
Old 02-01-2010, 10:59 AM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,009,663 times
Reputation: 22370
Here is some official info from the storms I mentioned above in 2002. I also checked and found that over 1.3 million folks were without power in NC, and most were located in the Piedmont.

The December 4-5, 2002 Southeast Severe Ice Storm: A Climatological Comparison | State Climate Office of North Carolina

Some excerpts:

Early in the winter season of 2002-2003, many areas across the Southeast were crippled by the effects of a powerful winter storm. In the Piedmont region, this storm quickly became known as the "December Ice Storm" with many communities experiencing record amounts of freezing rain. New records were also set across the Carolinas and Virginia in regards to power outages and their durations, traffic accidents, school closing durations, and fatalities resulting from an extreme weather event (Hurricane Hugo in 1989 set the previous record for regional power outages as reported by Duke Energy). Many communities across the Southeast, particularly across the Charlotte Metro and Triangle, NC areas, were left paralyzed for days, some over a week. While the effects of the storm have garnered significant attention in regards to the economic and social inconveniences they caused, the climatological significance of this storm has not been assessed. This type of analysis is critical in assessing probabilities for a recurrence of such a crippling storm.

  • Nearly 75% of the sampled stations recorded measurable amounts of freezing rain
  • Heaviest amounts were confined to the North Carolina Piedmont (eastern half)
  • Above-average amounts in the mountains of Tennessee, West Virginia, and Virginia
  • Freezing rain totals for most stations equaled or exceeded that of a storm experienced between one and four times each decade
  • The most significant recurrence intervals were at Bristol, TN (28 years) and Raleigh, NC (most freezing rain from a single storm since 1948)

More:

  • More than 25% of the sampled stations recorded measurable amounts of sleet
  • Heaviest amounts occurred in the Piedmont and Shenandoah Valley of Virginia
  • Average amounts in the North Carolina Piedmont
  • Sleet totals for most stations equaled or exceeded that of a storm experienced every one to five years

This type of storm DOES happen here, and although these storms may be spaced five years apart, they can happen in successive years. It is foohardy not to assume that any storm could not replicate the same damage and power outages that have crippled this region in the past.
 
Old 02-01-2010, 11:05 AM
 
1,554 posts, read 2,921,607 times
Reputation: 805
Here's what I don't get. My neighborhood is just starting to melt. It's still a big mess with a lot of ice on the sides of the road where cars haven't driven over. I just saw a woman walking down the street on the part of the road with the tire tracks. She had her back to traffic, was pushing a BABY STROLLER and had HEADPHONES on. I almost stopped to ask her if she realized how dangerous it was but she wouldn't have heard me.
 
Old 02-01-2010, 11:13 AM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,009,663 times
Reputation: 22370
Quote:
Originally Posted by chuckles34 View Post
Here's what I don't get. My neighborhood is just starting to melt. It's still a big mess with a lot of ice on the sides of the road where cars haven't driven over. I just saw a woman walking down the street on the part of the road with the tire tracks. She had her back to traffic, was pushing a BABY STROLLER and had HEADPHONES on. I almost stopped to ask her if she realized how dangerous it was but she wouldn't have heard me.
Yeah. Seems impossible that someone could be that much of an airhead not to realize that a car could easily go into a spin or an unstoppable slide and hit her and the baby. I suspect she has never seen a car spin out in her neighborhood before. Most likely moved here from some place that either has snow all winter and thus, plenty of road crews out keeping streets clear or she has never been around ice at all . . . either way . . . it is an incrediblly foolish thing to do.
 
Old 02-01-2010, 11:32 AM
 
Location: Lincoln County
146 posts, read 414,833 times
Reputation: 57
For those on a well for water, make sure you fill your bathtub with water so you have something to use to flush.

Quote:
Originally Posted by anifani821 View Post
Here is some official info from the storms I mentioned above in 2002. I also checked and found that over 1.3 million folks were without power in NC, and most were located in the Piedmont.

The December 4-5, 2002 Southeast Severe Ice Storm: A Climatological Comparison | State Climate Office of North Carolina

Some excerpts:

Early in the winter season of 2002-2003, many areas across the Southeast were crippled by the effects of a powerful winter storm. In the Piedmont region, this storm quickly became known as the "December Ice Storm" with many communities experiencing record amounts of freezing rain. New records were also set across the Carolinas and Virginia in regards to power outages and their durations, traffic accidents, school closing durations, and fatalities resulting from an extreme weather event (Hurricane Hugo in 1989 set the previous record for regional power outages as reported by Duke Energy). Many communities across the Southeast, particularly across the Charlotte Metro and Triangle, NC areas, were left paralyzed for days, some over a week. While the effects of the storm have garnered significant attention in regards to the economic and social inconveniences they caused, the climatological significance of this storm has not been assessed. This type of analysis is critical in assessing probabilities for a recurrence of such a crippling storm.

  • Nearly 75% of the sampled stations recorded measurable amounts of freezing rain
  • Heaviest amounts were confined to the North Carolina Piedmont (eastern half)
  • Above-average amounts in the mountains of Tennessee, West Virginia, and Virginia
  • Freezing rain totals for most stations equaled or exceeded that of a storm experienced between one and four times each decade
  • The most significant recurrence intervals were at Bristol, TN (28 years) and Raleigh, NC (most freezing rain from a single storm since 1948)

More:

  • More than 25% of the sampled stations recorded measurable amounts of sleet
  • Heaviest amounts occurred in the Piedmont and Shenandoah Valley of Virginia
  • Average amounts in the North Carolina Piedmont
  • Sleet totals for most stations equaled or exceeded that of a storm experienced every one to five years

This type of storm DOES happen here, and although these storms may be spaced five years apart, they can happen in successive years. It is foohardy not to assume that any storm could not replicate the same damage and power outages that have crippled this region in the past.
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