U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Illinois > Chicago Suburbs
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 11-09-2011, 01:27 PM
 
Location: Chicagoland
323 posts, read 330,399 times
Reputation: 459

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by oakparkdude View Post
I think obviously the trend toward central city/urban living/working is strongest/most advanced in those cities with the best developed urban cores. A prerequisite of a high-density functional urban core is having a well-developed mass transit system. Most of the sun-belt central cities are trying to catch-up with the established northern metros by building light rail transit systems.

As a rule of thumb, I tend to be very wary of Kotkin's arguments.
Granted that the newer cities are installing light rail at a breakneck pace, but these don't have the reach or capacity of something like Metra; they are more on the order of luxuries and attempts to stimulate a comparatively moribund downtown.

Chicago is something of a hybrid: certainly it has the dynamic urban core, and growth within that core (ie gentrification of the South Loop), but it is also dealing with a net loss of population. It is also a genuine top 10 world city, but at the same time most American of these, and thus more in tune with trends impacting American demographics. Of course its your perogative to distrust Kotkin, but one of his core arguements, that suburbs are increasingly diverse and dynamic, is persuasive to me. They certainly have advantages for immigrants of the professional class, who seem to me to be voting with their feet. If you look at somewhere like New York, San Francisco, or to be local, Streeterville, the cost of living can be prohibitively high. Add in an existing or desired family, and it multiplies, not to mention the potential concerns of social trust levels, which are indisuptably higher in at least certain suburbs.

For Chicago, it is probably not a stretch to say that the suburbs and central city have something of a symbiotic relationship.

Vlajos, I'm not really sure what your quarrel with me is, but I don't find your remark to be very enlightening.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-09-2011, 01:57 PM
 
Location: Oak Park, IL
5,520 posts, read 11,997,861 times
Reputation: 3820
Quote:
Originally Posted by Diws View Post
Granted that the newer cities are installing light rail at a breakneck pace, but these don't have the reach or capacity of something like Metra; they are more on the order of luxuries and attempts to stimulate a comparatively moribund downtown.

Chicago is something of a hybrid: certainly it has the dynamic urban core, and growth within that core (ie gentrification of the South Loop), but it is also dealing with a net loss of population. It is also a genuine top 10 world city, but at the same time most American of these, and thus more in tune with trends impacting American demographics. Of course its your perogative to distrust Kotkin, but one of his core arguements, that suburbs are increasingly diverse and dynamic, is persuasive to me. They certainly have advantages for immigrants of the professional class, who seem to me to be voting with their feet. If you look at somewhere like New York, San Francisco, or to be local, Streeterville, the cost of living can be prohibitively high. Add in an existing or desired family, and it multiplies, not to mention the potential concerns of social trust levels, which are indisuptably higher in at least certain suburbs.

For Chicago, it is probably not a stretch to say that the suburbs and central city have something of a symbiotic relationship.

Vlajos, I'm not really sure what your quarrel with me is, but I don't find your remark to be very enlightening.
I think we're actually in agreement when it comes to broad trends.
-Central cities with historic urban density (both population and infrastructure) are becoming increasingly desirable for the young and educated (the so-called "creative class").
-Suburbs are becoming increasingly popular with non-white families (including the poor), who are basically following the migration trends established by whites several decades earlier.

To a certain extent, these two trends are in opposition. In Chicago its true that the desirable North side neighborhoods gained in population over the past ten years while the city as a whole lost population. I think the data will show that the city gained in wealth despite the population loss. Ultimately, Chicago will likely evolve into a more European-like city with a wealthy, relatively childless population in the core surrounded by suburbs with relatively less wealth and relatively more children. Compared to the present, the population of the core may be larger, smaller, or about the same.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-09-2011, 08:53 PM
 
11,932 posts, read 14,427,097 times
Reputation: 7573
Isn't the discussion of office leasing and development patterns getting away from the issue of where someone working in Warrenville should live or commute?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-10-2011, 05:30 AM
 
28,393 posts, read 68,183,914 times
Reputation: 18202
Once someone decides to interject that a single young hire that is having a hard time deciding whether to live close to work or have access to broader social outlets is driving the office leasing market that opens the door to counter arguments...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Illinois > Chicago Suburbs
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top