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Old 12-27-2011, 03:23 PM
 
Location: Northwest Indiana
801 posts, read 2,418,270 times
Reputation: 977

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Well, a house worth $200,000 here would be capped at 1% of value (it can be lower), so no more then $2000. So about a third of what you are currently paying. I moved from Illinois in 1994 and traded a property tax bill in the thousands for one in the hundreds ( I paid $400 the first year on a house worth about $120,000). Its gone up since (but so has the value of the house) but now property taxes are now capped in Indiana, so that will slow the rises (home values would have to increase rapidly, the cap lowered mine a little). My house was probably worth $180,000 at the high point and it still taxed at that level, I need to get it reassessed since I probably would get $150,000 for it now. So you still have to watch the bill and make sure your house is worth what the taxman thinks its worth. A recently bought house is easier due to a recent figure (it will be taxed at what the house sold for).

Indiana doesn't have city stickers, though car registration at the state level is a little higher then Illinois (newer cars are more expensive to register then old ones). Your car and house insurance would be cheaper in most towns. NIPSCO (gas and electric) are lower then Com Ed and Nicor, some towns will add a tax, some don't. Water and garbage are lower then Illinois but are rising too. Sale taxes (6.75% vs 10.25% yikes) are also lower (that why people buy gas and smokes in Indiana, the reason for those huge gas stations on the state line). No transfer taxes on real estate (no lawyer required for normal sales either).

My guess,,, fees will rise quicker, since property tax increases are largely cut off. That may be the next battle. Governments will overspend no matter where you are, but Indiana has it under control far better then Illinois.

Many people don't think that high taxes don't add to the cost of living but it does in a big way. It has hurt the Illinois south suburbs like Oak Forest the worst. Most Indiana towns are as close to DT Chicago as the Illinois ones so that doesn't end up costing more to commute.
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Old 12-27-2011, 05:08 PM
 
Location: Not where you ever lived
11,544 posts, read 25,098,941 times
Reputation: 6189
Most states that offer low taxes don't have a 13M population, a massive school sysetem, a city the size of Chicago, the number of hospitals and libraries, the number of undereimployed or part time workers, the amount of poverty or the number or state parks that Illinois manages.
The states with the largest cities and largest populations share much of the same problems.

Ya gets what ya pays for. I don't like my taxes but I sure do like the perks that come with living here. .

Last edited by linicx; 12-28-2011 at 05:47 PM..
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Old 12-27-2011, 05:55 PM
 
46 posts, read 83,703 times
Reputation: 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by linicx View Post
Most states that offer low taxes don't have 13M population, a massive school sysetem, a city the size of Chicago, the number of hospitals and libraries, the number of underemployed or part time workers, the gross dollar amount of poverty or the number or state parks that Illinois manages. The states with the largest cities and largest populations share much of the same problems.

Ya gets what ya pays for. I don't like my taxes but I sure do like the perks that come with living here. .
Clearly the spelling on your post shows that the Illinois schools are top notch! If Chicago were a success story it would not have lost millions of people since the 1950s.

Last edited by linicx; 12-28-2011 at 05:45 PM..
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Old 12-28-2011, 05:42 PM
 
Location: Not where you ever lived
11,544 posts, read 25,098,941 times
Reputation: 6189
Your insightful opinion of my education has nothing to do with with Property Taxes or Chicago. Large cities, particularly those with very large MSA numbers naturally lose population through death, employment opportunities, improved education and family dynamics. Live births and new residents balance the loss. Population change is fluid and has been since the Colonies were formed. .

Tax is the price one pays to live and play in a world class city. The only people who actually believe that state and city governments are not corrupt wear blinders, live in a cocoon and never heard of Royko.

As a senior I paid a higher, across the board, tax rate and COL with less services in Missouri and Oklahoma than I ever did at any time in Illinois. I say unto you: Go forth and learn.

Last edited by linicx; 12-28-2011 at 06:38 PM..
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Old 12-29-2011, 12:07 PM
 
46 posts, read 83,703 times
Reputation: 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by linicx View Post
Your insightful opinion of my education has nothing to do with with Property Taxes or Chicago. Large cities, particularly those with very large MSA numbers naturally lose population through death, employment opportunities, improved education and family dynamics. Live births and new residents balance the loss. Population change is fluid and has been since the Colonies were formed. .

Tax is the price one pays to live and play in a world class city. The only people who actually believe that state and city governments are not corrupt wear blinders, live in a cocoon and never heard of Royko.

As a senior I paid a higher, across the board, tax rate and COL with less services in Missouri and Oklahoma than I ever did at any time in Illinois. I say unto you: Go forth and learn.
Your opinion is wrong. NYC has gained population nearly every year and so has dozens of other world class cities. Population decline for one decade is one thing...decade after decade is another. I don't mind paying taxes either for services. But there comes a point when enough is enough and I think Cook-Chicago metro is at that point. BTW Detroit and Cleveland were world class cities...look what corruption and failure to change with the times got them.
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Old 12-29-2011, 12:58 PM
 
Location: Portland OR
1,854 posts, read 2,635,749 times
Reputation: 2259
Quote:
Originally Posted by linicx View Post
As a senior I paid a higher, across the board, tax rate and COL with less services in Missouri and Oklahoma than I ever did at any time in Illinois. I say unto you: Go forth and learn.

No Way - I gotta through out the BS card on this one.
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