U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Illinois > Chicago Suburbs
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 09-29-2016, 05:56 PM
 
12,267 posts, read 15,138,463 times
Reputation: 8071

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by chet everett View Post
The folks shopping for homes that are laid out in the somewhat "countrified" style of places like Homer Glen or Campton Hills (as well as other spots in similar very low density suburbs / exurbs...) find the "uniqueness" of the larger homes / larger lot is hard to duplicate unless one has the money for much more costly towns like Oak Brook, Burr Ridge, South Barrington , etc.

That said, there is a weird sort of peril that folks who buy these homes face -- many of these homes were built by people that had very distinctive ideas about "luxury" and as such the overly personalized choices become quite dated. To update such homes even clever buyers often end up spending more than they can realistically recoup. The situation becomes more like buying a car that is "depreciating asset" rather than a more stable / appreciating asset.

Coupled with relatively high costs for maintenance (whether the owner has a tractor to cut the lawn, and learns how to keep the pool looking good or they contract out for such services...) the potential buyers for such homes is limited. Many of the folks with the lifestyle for such properties are small business owners -- Illinois' hostile business climate is essentially forcing many such folks to consider relocation to neighboring states or to different parts of the country / offshore...

The offsetting factor is that because there are typically quite small numbers of such homes and sales even in the best of times are much less frequent than in a typical massive tract style subdivision the impact of each sale is muted.
Good point. And those businesses whose biggest customer is the Dept of Mental Health have probably already gone out of business.

Last edited by pvande55; 09-29-2016 at 05:57 PM.. Reason: Verbiage
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-02-2016, 01:58 PM
 
Location: Glencoe, IL
302 posts, read 497,451 times
Reputation: 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by BRU67 View Post

This election cycle has been a complete Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey circus. But one thing I hope comes out of it is that those who rallied against the perceived hate by Trump and his supporters towards the poor and immigrants put that indignation into action - by trying to rectify the gross inequality we have in our own City and state. One great place to start would be to write to your State Representative and Senator telling them you support the School Funding Reform Act.

http://www.isbe.net/budget/FY15/fy15-sb16-ppt.pdf

It won't fix everything but it's the right (and constitutional) thing to do. We need to start somewhere.
Yeah, the free stuff brigade is going to vote to increase its own taxes. lol

Not sure what the Constitution has to do with it, though.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-02-2016, 07:25 PM
 
Location: Chicago, Little Village
3,935 posts, read 7,193,711 times
Reputation: 2743
Quote:
Originally Posted by Careless View Post
Yeah, the free stuff brigade is going to vote to increase its own taxes. lol

Not sure what the Constitution has to do with it, though.
A fundamental goal of the People of the State is the educational development of all persons to the limits of their capacities.

The State shall provide for an efficient system of high quality public educational institutions and services.
Education in public schools through the secondary level shall be free. There may be such other free education as the General Assembly provides by law.

The State has the primary responsibility for financing the system of public education.

Ill. Const., Art. X, Sec. 1
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-03-2016, 07:57 AM
 
Location: Tri-Cities
573 posts, read 653,976 times
Reputation: 403
Quote:
Originally Posted by BRU67 View Post
I think the general layout in 2026 will be affluent people in the City center - which will expand out from where it is now. How far will depend on how good Chicago is at attracting high paying jobs. The working class, whose wages are declining, will continue to move towards the inner-ring suburbs and some bungalow belt neighborhoods. The poor, much like today, will continue to occupy much of the south and west sides, with a few more in economically challenged inner-ring suburbs due to gentrification on some of the fringes. For example, you could see parts of East Garfield Park and North Lawndale gentrify if the City does really well. And, of course, there will always be very wealthy suburbs for the most affluent (Oak Park, River Forest, North Shore, etc.).

I think you'll see severe decreased demand for homes in car-dependent far flung suburbs. These offer difficult commutes to the large job center (Chicago) and I don't think the houses built in the 1990s and 2000s will age well. The build quality generally isn't there and they will become obsolete. They will be seen as too large and wasteful to millennial home buyers.

So in short, real estate values will increase in the City center and affluent suburbs. They will decrease somewhat in the inner-ring as the average income there declines and property taxes increase to address increased demands placed on schools, parks, etc. They will decrease a lot in exburbs due to decreased demand.
The two Fox Valley "anchor" burbs and many of their surrounding towns. Aurora, Elgin, Carpentersville, Oswego, Montgomery, Gilberts. Maybe to a smaller extent the Kaneland towns (Sugar Grove, Elburn).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-03-2016, 04:08 PM
 
Location: Chicago, Little Village
3,935 posts, read 7,193,711 times
Reputation: 2743
Quote:
Originally Posted by aga412 View Post
The two Fox Valley "anchor" burbs and many of their surrounding towns. Aurora, Elgin, Carpentersville, Oswego, Montgomery, Gilberts. Maybe to a smaller extent the Kaneland towns (Sugar Grove, Elburn).
Though I think more and more companies will locate their professional offices in the City to attract a young workforce (e.g. McDonalds), suburbs like Oak Brook (and Aurora and Naperville) will remain white collar job centers to some extent. But I doubt they'll be strong enough to sustain all of the exburbia which gobbled up cornfields like Pac Man before the 2008 housing crash.

Again, a lot of this depends on our state (and Chicago) getting it together and creating a business-friendly environment. The more successful they are at this, the more prosperity there will be to go around.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-03-2016, 08:16 PM
 
Location: Tri-Cities
573 posts, read 653,976 times
Reputation: 403
Quote:
Originally Posted by BRU67 View Post
Though I think more and more companies will locate their professional offices in the City to attract a young workforce (e.g. McDonalds), suburbs like Oak Brook (and Aurora and Naperville) will remain white collar job centers to some extent. But I doubt they'll be strong enough to sustain all of the exburbia which gobbled up cornfields like Pac Man before the 2008 housing crash.

Again, a lot of this depends on our state (and Chicago) getting it together and creating a business-friendly environment. The more successful they are at this, the more prosperity there will be to go around.
Naperville will definitely outlast Aurora. I feel like you are referring to the DuPage area of Aurora while the parts not zoned to Batavia schools in Kane will decline.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-04-2016, 05:20 PM
 
Location: Chicago
5,793 posts, read 6,484,085 times
Reputation: 5273
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rhino4401 View Post
i wonder about Evanston.
I would be shocked to see Evanston fit that category. No Chicago suburb has developed more into the mode of the new, denser, transit oriented community than Evanston. the city's downtown core has solidified its place as Chicagoland's best suburban downtown and its multistory condo and apartment building continue to grow as does the full length of the Chicago Ave. corridor. IMHO, Evanston will only become more desirable with its enviable location, continued urbanization, and sought after lifestyle.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-04-2016, 05:42 PM
 
Location: Glencoe, IL
302 posts, read 497,451 times
Reputation: 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by edsg25 View Post
I would be shocked to see Evanston fit that category. No Chicago suburb has developed more into the mode of the new, denser, transit oriented community than Evanston. the city's downtown core has solidified its place as Chicagoland's best suburban downtown and its multistory condo and apartment building continue to grow as does the full length of the Chicago Ave. corridor. IMHO, Evanston will only become more desirable with its enviable location, continued urbanization, and sought after lifestyle.
Yeah, Evanston's going the other way. Skokie, OTOH, I worry about.

@BRU67: if you're going to bring up the Illinois Constitution, you really need to be specific about that in the first place.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-04-2016, 06:22 PM
 
1,851 posts, read 1,466,439 times
Reputation: 1283
Quote:
Originally Posted by Careless View Post
Yeah, Evanston's going the other way. Skokie, OTOH, I worry about.

@BRU67: if you're going to bring up the Illinois Constitution, you really need to be specific about that in the first place.
I'm heavily considering buying in Evanston or just north of Isabella once kids are involved.

I go back and forth on Skokie. Good schools, great location, an improving downtown, and a high end mall make me feel it'll be okay. There are A LOT of rental properties though...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-04-2016, 07:38 PM
 
65 posts, read 44,420 times
Reputation: 71
Many parents are satisfied with the schools, and committed to living in Evanston, but the district appears to be in for headline-making cuts. Even without pension cost shift or changes in state funding, projected revenues won't cover fixed costs.

Kids with special needs are not served as well as they are in other suburban districts, which affects the experience for everyone, class size isn't low, and equity issues remain significant. Taxes are already relatively high. OTOH, there may be enough love for the transit & other amenities for Evanston to get by with reductions in the elementary program. The schools will still be good enough, diverse, and the family gets to live in Evanston.

Skokie is not comparable to Evanston in other ways, but the non district 65 schools are as good, or better, and don't seem to be in as big of trouble revenue-wise.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Illinois > Chicago Suburbs
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top