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Old 05-02-2017, 10:03 AM
 
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
5,618 posts, read 4,660,165 times
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West Chicago and Wheaton.
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Old 05-02-2017, 08:08 PM
 
Location: Chicago
3,569 posts, read 6,389,030 times
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Maywood and River forest/Forest Park

Nothing else compares. Thread complete.
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Old 05-05-2017, 01:15 AM
 
49 posts, read 66,059 times
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Default Munster and Highland have a lot in common...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Northwest Indiana View Post
Already mentioned, but the two with the greatest difference is probably River Forest and Maywood.

Others (some not as vastly):

Matteson & Frankfort
Crete & St. John
Munster & Lansing
Munster & Highland
Portage & Chesterton
Portage & Valparaiso
Markham & Oak Forest
South Barrington & Hoffman Estates
Munster and Highland, not at all in my opinion. Both very low crime. Both are very much predominantly white, and while Munster may be more noted for people of Asian descent, believe me, Highland has its share as well. Both have above average school systems; sure, one is among the best in the state, and the other is just "above average," but they have more in common than different.

In terms of income and home values, Munster wins overall, but Munster has its swarths of middle class, older homes, while Highland has its neighborhoods like Arbor Hill and the Highland extension of White Oak Estates, which blends right into the Munster border all the way from Indianapolis Blvd.

There is an emphasis on school sports, a lot of "preppy" kids, concerned parents, and long-time, older residents who think their town is better than the one next to it, just because, people who think they're better because of what subdivision they're in or what side of Ridge Rd. they're on, so on, in either town. Munster may edge out Highland in income and medical offices and may be a bit more conservative, but Highland has the edge in retail. They seem to be similar towns with a rivalry, and I have quite a bit of experience with both (see username).

I'd say Highland has as much in common with Munster as it does Griffith. Comparing Munster and Griffith (who of course are separated by Highland) directly would yield more differences, but all 3 towns are more similar than they'd like to admit, and are integrated with each other in some form, with Highland being a middle ground among the 3 - Munster being the most wealthy and conservative, Griffith being the most blue-collar and racially diverse, and Highland having elements of both and a central retail hub.

Munster vs. Lansing is a much better comparison. Many Lansing residents have crossed the border into Indiana, and residents from Chicago and other South Suburbs have come to Lansing, so it's fair to say typical Lansing residents have different political views and experiences from typical Munster residents at this point, with the residents who have continued to stay in Lansing a long time having different views from their counterparts who left in the first place. Not to mention the differences in income and even more so race (and likely race relations/views) that have developed. Lansing and Calumet City share a lot of retail that most Munster residents would bypass for Munster itself or Highland/Schererville.

Comparing Hammond, East Chicago, and Gary to pretty well any smaller neighboring towns may be the best comparison to make within the Indiana side.

Last edited by Griffland219; 05-05-2017 at 01:27 AM..
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Old 05-05-2017, 01:24 AM
 
49 posts, read 66,059 times
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Lightbulb Ford Heights and Lynwood

Compare their population, crime rate, housing stock, income, racial diversity, public services, government, city beautification, pretty much anything, it's a stark contrast.

Last edited by Griffland219; 05-05-2017 at 01:34 AM..
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Old 08-21-2019, 01:28 PM
 
613 posts, read 245,688 times
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Skokie and Evanston. Evanston has the feeling of a built up mature community. It's a lakefront suburb which feels as if it's a city. It has both CTA and Metra service. Of course, it's also the home of Northwestern. Evanston's downtown has an impressive number of mid-rise buildings. The one area in Evanston is somewhat lacking is in its retail options.


Skokie is a prime example of 1950s and 60s suburbia. The housing stock consists of many ranches, split levels, apartment buildings and condominiums. Its street grid pattern and Chicago house numbering system give it an air of a suburban version of the bungalow belt. It has the largest mall in the northern suburbs (Old Orchard). Much of its retail consist of chain stores and franchises.


A friend who was a resident of Evanston joked that the North Shore Channel was the moat which separated Evanston and Skokie.
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Old 08-21-2019, 02:46 PM
 
Location: Evanston, Lake Forest, and Wrigleyville, Illinois
2,477 posts, read 1,566,171 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nearwest View Post
Skokie and Evanston. Evanston has the feeling of a built up mature community. It's a lakefront suburb which feels as if it's a city. It has both CTA and Metra service. Of course, it's also the home of Northwestern. Evanston's downtown has an impressive number of mid-rise buildings. The one area in Evanston is somewhat lacking is in its retail options.


Skokie is a prime example of 1950s and 60s suburbia. The housing stock consists of many ranches, split levels, apartment buildings and condominiums. Its street grid pattern and Chicago house numbering system give it an air of a suburban version of the bungalow belt. It has the largest mall in the northern suburbs (Old Orchard). Much of its retail consist of chain stores and franchises.


A friend who was a resident of Evanston joked that the North Shore Channel was the moat which separated Evanston and Skokie.
I disagree with this for the most part. Skokie is a mature built-out suburb just like Evanston and the other North Shore communities. They actually built-out around the same time. If you explore a lot of west Evanston, the 2nd ward especially, you'll find that '50s and '60s homes make up the majority of the housing stock. Skokie/Evanston 60203 looks more like northwest Evanston, with most of the housing being built in the '30s and '40s by the developer C.A. Hemphill who resided in Evanston for most of his life. Skokie also has its fair share of mid-rise buildings scattered throughout, especially along Skokie Blvd, Woods Drive, Golf Road, and in its downtown. Skokie doesn't have Metra, but it does have CTA and Pace. Evanston and Skokie are similar in size, share schools, and have some reciprocity of resident benefits. The North Shore Channel divides Evanston into two parts as well...

I think the person mentioning Maywood and River Forest nailed it. I might add North Chicago and Lake Bluff.
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Old 08-23-2019, 12:00 AM
 
760 posts, read 665,600 times
Reputation: 995
Schaumburg and Roselle
Schaumburg and Hanover Park
Northbrook and Wheeling
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Old 08-23-2019, 08:58 AM
 
Location: IL
500 posts, read 412,199 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beardown91737 View Post
Schaumburg and Roselle
Schaumburg and Hanover Park
It'll be interesting to see how similar these towns become in 10-20 years.
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Old 08-28-2019, 04:47 PM
 
25 posts, read 14,626 times
Reputation: 30
Elmhurst and the adjacent suburbs of Berkeley/Bellwood, Villa Park, Hillside, and Northlake. Elmhurst is a upper middle class predominatly white suburb, while Villa Park is lower middle class/working-class, and Berkeley and Hillside are also lower middle class/working class and predominantly non white, and Bellwood is predominantly African american and lower middle class/working class, and Northlake is mainly working class/lower middle class.

Elmhurst has remained an upper middle class suburb with little to no diversity all of these years while all the surrounding adjacent suburbs are diverse and predominantly non white and have a blue collar industrial, service feel to it.

Drive on St Charles road and you will see a major change after crossing 294 & 290, When you enter Elmhurst, you will see the typical suburban aesthetic you see in the movies, big houses, people jogging, stroller moms, kids playing outside on playground, a college campus, a bustling downtown, tree lined streets, but when you enter Berkeley and Bellwood you see more of a blue collar, industrial type of feel to it with strip stores, warehouses, gas stations and fast food resturants and then entering Villa Park, it becomes like Berkeley/Bellwood again with the strip malls, blue collar feel to it, lots of fast food cheap food joints on the street, and gas stations. The same goes for Elmhurst and Northlake, when you are on North Avenue and cross 294 east, its a more industrial blue collar vibe with retail stores, fast food, gas stations etc, and when you cross into Elmhurst it's a more typical suburban community you see on tv.

It always facsinates me how Elmhurst has remained the way it is.

Last edited by BigMan72; 08-28-2019 at 04:59 PM..
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Old 08-28-2019, 11:48 PM
 
Location: Galewood
3,973 posts, read 9,239,103 times
Reputation: 2432
Oak Forest and Markham
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