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Old 05-31-2017, 06:22 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rhino4401 View Post
Consider Glencoe
Thanks for the suggestion. Would you say Glencoe is diverse, or perhaps as diverse as Lincolnshire? I'd be keen on knowing if it has a reasonable Indian/ Asian population.

Any thoughts on Northbrook? I was recently told that while the Glenbrook North HS is not as highly ranked as New Trier or Stevenson, it's still quite good, and worth considering.
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Old 06-01-2017, 12:31 AM
 
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Default I'd be hesitant to recommend Glencoe...

Quote:
Originally Posted by SS77 View Post
Thanks for the suggestion. Would you say Glencoe is diverse, or perhaps as diverse as Lincolnshire? I'd be keen on knowing if it has a reasonable Indian/ Asian population.

Any thoughts on Northbrook? I was recently told that while the Glenbrook North HS is not as highly ranked as New Trier or Stevenson, it's still quite good, and worth considering.
Although Glencoe is a tolerant and open minded town, it is not very diverse. (I grew up there and currently live there with a child in the Glencoe schools). There's only a handful of Asian/South Asian families in town. A quick search on schooldigger.com reveals the Asian population at the various schools ranges from 2.8-4.8%. Not very noteworthy compared to other districts you may be looking at. However, Avoca 37 (feeds into New Trier) has one elementary school and one middle school with a combined Asian population of around 25%. As far as the number of Indian families in the district, I cannot speak for that but Avoca is an excellent district with much more ethnic (and likely economic) diversity compared to other districts that feed into New Trier.

GBN is also quite a good school. A larger Asian population (15%) than NT (5%), but not as large as Stavenson's (22%). Overall, I think you will be welcome in any of these North Shore communities, but some may lack in the type of diversity you are seeking. Best of luck to you and your family in your search!
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Old 06-01-2017, 11:17 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SS77 View Post
Thanks for the suggestion. Would you say Glencoe is diverse, or perhaps as diverse as Lincolnshire? I'd be keen on knowing if it has a reasonable Indian/ Asian population.

Any thoughts on Northbrook? I was recently told that while the Glenbrook North HS is not as highly ranked as New Trier or Stevenson, it's still quite good, and worth considering.
I'd be surprised if Lincolnshire is any more diverse then Glencoe, it seems very white. But that's just my impression. You'll have to look up the demographics of the elementary district. Glencoe has a reputation as being inclusive, community minded.

I have friends in both places, and though their kids do similar activities, the lifestyle is different. Lincolnshire is more like an outer suburb--families play and bike around their subdivisions & otherwise drive places. Houses are newer, and larger. In Glencoe you get less space for you money. On the plus side (IMO) it really is a village. People bike & walk to playgrounds, the little downtown, & the beach. Maybe that people are out is why Glencoe seems less white. There's a Korean cohort, and I have seen South Asian kids, but the tiny percentage in stat from PP isn't surprising.

I would guess that in Glencoe people might be more likely to recognize differences & make an effort to be inclusive, whereas more people in Lincolnshire strive to be color blind.

In Glencoe there are 3 elementary schools--K-2, 3-5, 6-8 is the breakdown, I think--you could call the ones corresponding o your kids ages & ask how many South Asian kids. The staff might not know off the top, but they should be able to find out. They'll get wanting to know if your kid would be the only South Asian in a given grade.

Northbrook is a larger, car-oriented suburb, and not as uniformly highly affluent as Lincolnshire & Glencoe. I know the elementary schools are outstanding & have a lot of resources (there's one district to avoid, I can't remember the number off the top but you'll see it in here via search). Northbrook elementary schools are better than Glencoe in re serving gifted kids. In Glencoe the expectation is that everyone can & will achieve. They deliver, but gifted kids don't receive the attention, acceleration that is offered in Northbrook. I don't know about Lincolnshire in re gifted education.
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Old 06-01-2017, 11:48 AM
Status: "T.e.m.p. B.a.n.n.e.d" (set 28 days ago)
 
3,846 posts, read 2,461,000 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rhino4401 View Post
I'd be surprised if Lincolnshire is any more diverse then Glencoe, it seems very white. But that's just my impression. You'll have to look up the demographics of the elementary district. Glencoe has a reputation as being inclusive, community minded.

I have friends in both places, and though their kids do similar activities, the lifestyle is different. Lincolnshire is more like an outer suburb--families play and bike around their subdivisions & otherwise drive places. Houses are newer, and larger. In Glencoe you get less space for you money. On the plus side (IMO) it really is a village. People bike & walk to playgrounds, the little downtown, & the beach. Maybe that people are out is why Glencoe seems less white. There's a Korean cohort, and I have seen South Asian kids, but the tiny percentage in stat from PP isn't surprising.

I would guess that in Glencoe people might be more likely to recognize differences & make an effort to be inclusive, whereas more people in Lincolnshire strive to be color blind.

In Glencoe there are 3 elementary schools--K-2, 3-5, 6-8 is the breakdown, I think--you could call the ones corresponding o your kids ages & ask how many South Asian kids. The staff might not know off the top, but they should be able to find out. They'll get wanting to know if your kid would be the only South Asian in a given grade.

Northbrook is a larger, car-oriented suburb, and not as uniformly highly affluent as Lincolnshire & Glencoe. I know the elementary schools are outstanding & have a lot of resources (there's one district to avoid, I can't remember the number off the top but you'll see it in here via search). Northbrook elementary schools are better than Glencoe in re serving gifted kids. In Glencoe the expectation is that everyone can & will achieve. They deliver, but gifted kids don't receive the attention, acceleration that is offered in Northbrook. I don't know about Lincolnshire in re gifted education.
The whole notion of any area being 'diverse' is really a non-starter until you see numbers, not sliver percentages.

That said, FWIW, there are more South Asians moving into areas served by Stevenson HS, including Lincolnshire. A lot more housing options there, especially vs Glencoe.
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Old 06-01-2017, 12:46 PM
 
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I think the biggest difference in the aesthetics & architecture within the Stevenson HS & the New Trier HS area is that the suburbs feeding into Stevenson feel more outer ring suburban in nature (as someone else mentioned) & a bit less densely populated minus some of the older Buffalo Grove suburbs (these can get a bit higher in population density). Also, I get the feeling that some of the burbs feeding into Stevenson HS are simply more affordable than the ones feeding into New Trier. The Stevenson area has the new money feeling that's further away from the city, while the New Trier suburbs are largely old money suburbs closer to Chicago.

In terms of Indian (Southasian) population it is no contest. The Stevenson HS area has far more Indians than New Trier with the exception of west Wilmette, east Glenview & possibly Northfield. The districts feeding into Glenbrook South (Glenview) & Glenbrook North (Northbrook) also have a large Indian population. Buffalo Grove itself has a ton of Indians in the area (only the Lake County portion feeds into Stevenson HS as I'm sure you're aware).

Picking between Stevenson HS & New Trier HS truly is a tough dilemma. I'm not sure which one I would go with. But simply from the perspective of fitting in, Stevenson might be the better bet.
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Old 06-01-2017, 01:56 PM
 
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What matters also is how the schools put emphasis on inclusion. There are some schools that do well in this regard and some that don't. Some of the schools that do well making sure that there's not a lot of bullying happen not to be diverse.

I think Stevenson make sense, commute wise, Price wise, and diversity. In The new Trier district The only place I would recommend for you is Glencoe. However, multiple areas in the Stevenson district will work well for you. Lincolnshire is the least diverse in the Stevenson district with only 6% Asians. Buffalo Grove is the most diverse at 18% Asians. Long Grove and kildeer have 11% Asians.
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Old 06-04-2017, 10:20 PM
 
Location: Chicagoland
5,689 posts, read 8,854,145 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SS77 View Post
Thanks for the suggestion. Would you say Glencoe is diverse, or perhaps as diverse as Lincolnshire? I'd be keen on knowing if it has a reasonable Indian/ Asian population.

Any thoughts on Northbrook? I was recently told that while the Glenbrook North HS is not as highly ranked as New Trier or Stevenson, it's still quite good, and worth considering.

Yes, Glenbrook, New Trier, Stevenson all "rank" well... But "good" is relative to your child... Is it good for them?

IMO you seem to be overly reliant on "the rankings" of schools, yet you do not mention the needs of your children... Isn't that putting the cart before the horse? What is the best fit for your child? What type of students are your children? What academic support, or challenge/acceleration do they need? What is their testing profile? What is the best type of learning environment? Class/school size? Do they have special talents/interests in particular subjects, arts, music, sports, etc? Will they thrive in a large school, or be overwhelmed by it? How do they handle competition?

These are the types of questions you should be asking IMO.

Start with your child's needs, then figure out their best learning environment.

And your kids will still be able to get into the top colleges (Ivy, MIT, Big 10 - whatever) if they somehow do not attend NT or Stevenson. They may even have a better chance at it - but that's a whole other topic...
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Old 06-07-2017, 04:10 AM
 
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Minorities who look for "diverse" neighbourhoods crack me up. I can understand when white people do it and want to be exposed to diversity but minorities who try to avoid homogenously white neighbourhoods are propagating the problem.

As an Asian who has grown up and continuously live in mainly white areas I have had no problems. Why not BE the diversity you are looking for? What are you afraid of? Start the trend.
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Old 06-07-2017, 01:00 PM
 
11 posts, read 10,547 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bulok View Post
Minorities who look for "diverse" neighbourhoods crack me up. I can understand when white people do it and want to be exposed to diversity but minorities who try to avoid homogenously white neighbourhoods are propagating the problem.

As an Asian who has grown up and continuously live in mainly white areas I have had no problems. Why not BE the diversity you are looking for? What are you afraid of? Start the trend.
I can appreciate the intent of your comment. It’s not possible to frame our collective experiences as minorities in neat or shapely narratives. The idea of being cultural trendsetters is quite terrific, and we will get inconspicuous opportunities to do so regardless of where we choose to live. However, setting trends is not our primary concern in finding our next home – we are looking for a community where our kids can thrive socially, academically, and cultivate a reasonable sense of cultural identity and connectivity.

Identity and connectivity can be explored in many ways – we don’t intend to force it on our kids. However, as parents, we’d like to provide our kids opportunities to absorb diverse influences – the narrative they ultimately choose to create will be up to them. Since you asked, our thought process isn’t driven by fear as such; it's motivated by what we can do set ourselves up for success. Regardless, I’m happy my post provided you a moment of levity.
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Old 06-07-2017, 01:30 PM
 
28,449 posts, read 72,693,835 times
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Default Kind of a word soup...

Quote:
Originally Posted by SS77 View Post
I can appreciate the intent of your comment. It’s not possible to frame our collective experiences as minorities in neat or shapely narratives. The idea of being cultural trendsetters is quite terrific, and we will get inconspicuous opportunities to do so regardless of where we choose to live. However, setting trends is not our primary concern in finding our next home – we are looking for a community where our kids can thrive socially, academically, and cultivate a reasonable sense of cultural identity and connectivity.

Identity and connectivity can be explored in many ways – we don’t intend to force it on our kids. However, as parents, we’d like to provide our kids opportunities to absorb diverse influences – the narrative they ultimately choose to create will be up to them. Since you asked, our thought process isn’t driven by fear as such; it's motivated by what we can do set ourselves up for success. Regardless, I’m happy my post provided you a moment of levity.

Sounds very colorful! Good luck! Let us know when you settle in.
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