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Old 08-09-2018, 06:14 AM
 
Location: Chicago
6,357 posts, read 6,913,923 times
Reputation: 5732

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Master Jay View Post
Milwaukee certainly has some diversity in it's suburbs. However no Milwaukee suburb seems to celebrate or show such a mixture of diversity in it's businesses, churches, etc. as Skokie... In fact, I just posted a thread in the Chicago Suburbs section on Skokie. I've lived in the Milwaukee my whole life, but places like Skokie, Morton Grove, Niles, etc. have my heart! Enjoy the day!- Master Jay from Milwaukee
The old Skokie had a stereotype (although admittedly not a reality) of being basically Jewish. There was no question that after WWII and many more years following, Skokie was seen as a Jewish suburb.

Today, Skokie is the United Nations, an incredibly diverse suburb. At Skokie's annual festival of cultures, an huge array of flags fly to represent the nations where Skokians came from.
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Old 08-10-2018, 02:53 PM
 
Location: Milwaukee, Wisconsin
1,008 posts, read 385,786 times
Reputation: 819
edsg25, Yes my friend. Skokie IS one of my favorites. My children and I typically make it to the Festival of cultures. I am going to petition for next year to do a Tae Kwon Do demonstration. I might make it down for a stop in Chicago/Skokie this week! Have a great day- Master Jay from Milwaukee
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Old 08-10-2018, 03:23 PM
 
Location: Chicago
6,357 posts, read 6,913,923 times
Reputation: 5732
Quote:
Originally Posted by Master Jay View Post
edsg25, Yes my friend. Skokie IS one of my favorites. My children and I typically make it to the Festival of cultures. I am going to petition for next year to do a Tae Kwon Do demonstration. I might make it down for a stop in Chicago/Skokie this week! Have a great day- Master Jay from Milwaukee
Thanks, Master Jay.....and I love Milwaukee. Skokie was in my old neck of the woods...lived in Evanston many years (went to high school there.....ETHS which included a section of Skokie).

Are any Milw suburbs as diverse as Skokie? If there was one that I think might be, it would be Tosa. btw, Milwaukee has some great suburbs....areas like Whitefish Bay and Shorewood are basically like our North Shore. Maybe it's a bit of a stretch to call Cedarsburg a "suburb"....but it definitely close by and very quaint and historic.

As long as you're coming to Chicago, do you mind picking up some Saz's bbq and some carry out from Mader's...along with a stop at Mars Cheese (I mean...well...you're going to be going right by it) and drop them off at my place.

(oops....almost forgot: there are a few stalls at the Public Market in the 3rd ward I'd like you to stop at)
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Old 08-10-2018, 03:39 PM
 
Location: Milwaukee, Wisconsin
1,008 posts, read 385,786 times
Reputation: 819
edsg25, I live technically in the suburb, Greenfield. Milwaukee is across the street. Greenfield has a good size of people of Hispanic extract (myself included ). Also I see a good representation of Caucasian backgrounds, and people of Middle Eastern origin. Much like your area, our Jewish population tends to be north of our city (Shorewood, Fox Point, Whitefish Bay). I also agree it is not proper to call Cedarburg a Milwaukee suburb ( and I have debated on other posts what constitutes a suburb, but it is very charming. I dated a girl from Bolingbrook who LOVED Cedarburg as well as Lake Geneva... Did you see Mars Cheese Castle has expanded? It looks nice.... With all the Wisconsin food I'm bringing down for you all, I am going to have to charge!
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Old 08-11-2018, 01:02 PM
 
Location: Chicago
6,357 posts, read 6,913,923 times
Reputation: 5732
Quote:
Originally Posted by Master Jay View Post
edsg25, I live technically in the suburb, Greenfield. Milwaukee is across the street. Greenfield has a good size of people of Hispanic extract (myself included ). Also I see a good representation of Caucasian backgrounds, and people of Middle Eastern origin. Much like your area, our Jewish population tends to be north of our city (Shorewood, Fox Point, Whitefish Bay). I also agree it is not proper to call Cedarburg a Milwaukee suburb ( and I have debated on other posts what constitutes a suburb, but it is very charming. I dated a girl from Bolingbrook who LOVED Cedarburg as well as Lake Geneva... Did you see Mars Cheese Castle has expanded? It looks nice.... With all the Wisconsin food I'm bringing down for you all, I am going to have to charge!
Do you really think I would have missed the expansion? Actually ate in the new room in back.
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Old 08-26-2018, 01:38 PM
 
794 posts, read 510,329 times
Reputation: 1151
Having lived over much of the Midwest only two things stand out to me as differentiating the Chicago burbs, which are largely unremarkable as suburbs tend to be. 1) The presence of METRA goes a long way toward making suburban life practical for those who work downtown, and 2) I can't think of any other Midwest burbs with the density or diversity of Oak Park or, especially, Evanston.
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Old 08-26-2018, 05:36 PM
 
28,449 posts, read 72,701,362 times
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For folks who claim to have lived in much of the Midwest and find most of it unremarkable I really have to question what sorts of things have motivated their moves. In my experience working with folks who were relocated to the Chicago region for business reasons I was always struck by how many such families found our area exceptional places for work opportunities as well as offering a unique mix of advantages for raising families. These facts are fully supported by the more detailed trends in household formation and median incomes that are rather different than the over population trends -- the fact is smaller, more affluent households, who have more choice and ability to relocate are replacing larger families with less affluence -- https://www.forbes.com/sites/petesau.../#353f9402344e

For the most part the various municipalities in the region are extremely cognizant of these trends and work hard to make the kinds of improvements that are most likely to foster the elements that will continue to support such trends. In contrast too many other regions, and especially their suburbs remain stuck in the mindset that really has been in decline since the 60s -- generic, car-centric suburbs dominated by strip malls, expressway ramps, and cut de sac subdivisions are really uncommon in most parts of DuPage and Cook where rail access in available. To be sure not everyone who lives in such suburbs relies on Metro or even appreciates it as far more workers undoubted work outside the "hub" that Metro concentrates commuters into BUT the side effects of everything from how railings interest the road grid to the heirarchy that exists in home prices that are convenient but not too close to rail station shapes the literal layout of the region as well as providing a unique layer of price stability. In other regions without that stabilizing factor the speed with which some suburbs go from "desirable" to "passé" has a negative effect.

Finally I cannot help but point out that this supposed well traveled poster almost certainly is confusing their perception of density for what is really a deliberate kind of development pattern that is not directly about density but instead concentrates certain kids of retail businesses in designated core. The fact is towns like Stone Park, Cicero, Berwyn, and Bellwood, which all are distinctly lacking in parks and thick with affordable multi-family housing all have greater density than not just Oak Park and Evanston but even greater than Chicago itself -- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...lation_density

To be sure there are some portions of other nice Midwestern smaller cities / suburbs that have similar organizing principles, among them are those with colleges and other sizable populations of folks with the time and inclination to walk around -- https://www.redfin.com/blog/2016/07/...e-midwest.html In the case of at least one such area that I have visted many times for both work and vacation one could say the infusion of relatively young affiuent workers in what is kind of a "reverse city to suburb" commute of hipper folks employed by the global manufacturer firm of Kohler desiring a more walkable place to live in the heart of Sheboygan -- https://www.walkscore.com/WI/Sheboygan/Downtown
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Old 08-26-2018, 06:04 PM
Status: "T.e.m.p. B.a.n.n.e.d" (set 29 days ago)
 
3,846 posts, read 2,462,234 times
Reputation: 2990
Quote:
Originally Posted by svicious22 View Post
Having lived over much of the Midwest only two things stand out to me as differentiating the Chicago burbs, which are largely unremarkable as suburbs tend to be. 1) The presence of METRA goes a long way toward making suburban life practical for those who work downtown, and 2) I can't think of any other Midwest burbs with the density or diversity of Oak Park or, especially, Evanston.
This merely illustrates that you don’t care for suburbs.
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Old 08-29-2018, 11:12 AM
 
3,901 posts, read 6,136,328 times
Reputation: 2272
Chet is right. Berwyn and Cicero are the most dense areas more so than Chicago or Oak Park. I live around a lot of families that have relocated to the Chicago suburbs from other geographical areas and they love it here. Of course they live in an upscale area, but they always remark on how they like it here so much better than where they were before.

Some of the suburbs are unremarkable. But others are quite remarkable depending on which ones you visit. People that lump them together and call them the burbs are generally suburb haters.
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Old 09-04-2018, 05:24 PM
 
794 posts, read 510,329 times
Reputation: 1151
Quote:
Originally Posted by chet everett View Post
For folks who claim to have lived in much of the Midwest and find most of it unremarkable I really have to question what sorts of things have motivated their moves. In my experience working with folks who were relocated to the Chicago region for business reasons I was always struck by how many such families found our area exceptional places for work opportunities as well as offering a unique mix of advantages for raising families. These facts are fully supported by the more detailed trends in household formation and median incomes that are rather different than the over population trends -- the fact is smaller, more affluent households, who have more choice and ability to relocate are replacing larger families with less affluence -- https://www.forbes.com/sites/petesau.../#353f9402344e

For the most part the various municipalities in the region are extremely cognizant of these trends and work hard to make the kinds of improvements that are most likely to foster the elements that will continue to support such trends. In contrast too many other regions, and especially their suburbs remain stuck in the mindset that really has been in decline since the 60s -- generic, car-centric suburbs dominated by strip malls, expressway ramps, and cut de sac subdivisions are really uncommon in most parts of DuPage and Cook where rail access in available. To be sure not everyone who lives in such suburbs relies on Metro or even appreciates it as far more workers undoubted work outside the "hub" that Metro concentrates commuters into BUT the side effects of everything from how railings interest the road grid to the heirarchy that exists in home prices that are convenient but not too close to rail station shapes the literal layout of the region as well as providing a unique layer of price stability. In other regions without that stabilizing factor the speed with which some suburbs go from "desirable" to "passé" has a negative effect.

Finally I cannot help but point out that this supposed well traveled poster almost certainly is confusing their perception of density for what is really a deliberate kind of development pattern that is not directly about density but instead concentrates certain kids of retail businesses in designated core. The fact is towns like Stone Park, Cicero, Berwyn, and Bellwood, which all are distinctly lacking in parks and thick with affordable multi-family housing all have greater density than not just Oak Park and Evanston but even greater than Chicago itself -- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...lation_density

To be sure there are some portions of other nice Midwestern smaller cities / suburbs that have similar organizing principles, among them are those with colleges and other sizable populations of folks with the time and inclination to walk around -- https://www.redfin.com/blog/2016/07/...e-midwest.html In the case of at least one such area that I have visted many times for both work and vacation one could say the infusion of relatively young affiuent workers in what is kind of a "reverse city to suburb" commute of hipper folks employed by the global manufacturer firm of Kohler desiring a more walkable place to live in the heart of Sheboygan -- https://www.walkscore.com/WI/Sheboygan/Downtown
Good lord, I am not going to try and address that windbag post in detail except to say a couple of things:

—several of the dense suburbs you mention, e.g. Stone Park are some of the worst places to live anywhere. Why would I cite such hellholes as a differentiating factor? If they represent some statistical anomaly that gets you off, that’s your problem. Obviously I am more attuned to the urban amenities of the places I mentioned because they are city-like in away that is hard to find. Congrats on discerning that.
—I live in the city, there’s no suburb in the Chicago area worth moving to from anywhere half way decent.
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