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Old 04-30-2012, 06:13 PM
 
Location: River North, Chicago, Illinois
3,147 posts, read 3,051,594 times
Reputation: 2997

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I chose Chicago because I felt the people were actually pretty warm and friendly, there was a lot going on but at a pace that didn't wear me out. I liked its mix of issues that seem to parallel a lot of the same issue the U.S. overall experiences.

That said, Chicago doesn't have everything New York does. We don't have as much financial power. We don't have nearly as many museums. We don't have as much of a film industry. We have fewer direct flights to other cities. Our subway system is less complete. We have few international retail brands. We have fewer varieties of ethnic foods.

We do have more of most of those things than most of American cities - even more than many other global cities - but it's not like Chicago really is just a cheaper New York. We're different. In a different geography, with a different history. I like Chicago a lot - all things being equal I could easily live here the rest of my life. Chances are that I won't, but I could be perfectly happy doing so. But I think it cheapens Chicago to say it's "like New York but cheaper." Because, really, we're not *that* much like New York. And that's a good thing.
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Old 04-30-2012, 06:25 PM
 
389 posts, read 409,583 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by emathias View Post
I chose Chicago because I felt the people were actually pretty warm and friendly, there was a lot going on but at a pace that didn't wear me out. I liked its mix of issues that seem to parallel a lot of the same issue the U.S. overall experiences.

That said, Chicago doesn't have everything New York does. We don't have as much financial power. We don't have nearly as many museums. We don't have as much of a film industry. We have fewer direct flights to other cities. Our subway system is less complete. We have few international retail brands. We have fewer varieties of ethnic foods.

We do have more of most of those things than most of American cities - even more than many other global cities - but it's not like Chicago really is just a cheaper New York. We're different. In a different geography, with a different history. I like Chicago a lot - all things being equal I could easily live here the rest of my life. Chances are that I won't, but I could be perfectly happy doing so. But I think it cheapens Chicago to say it's "like New York but cheaper." Because, really, we're not *that* much like New York. And that's a good thing.
Please elaborate on friendliness from people in Chicago. I think its subjective, and it depends a lot on their perception of you. I found that foreign immigrants like students going to schools do not mix in as well as born Americans and it feels segregated. But when it comes to politeness, I definitely see it more around here than in NYC.
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Old 04-30-2012, 06:33 PM
 
Location: River North, Chicago, Illinois
3,147 posts, read 3,051,594 times
Reputation: 2997
Quote:
Originally Posted by mayhem_223 View Post
Please elaborate on friendliness from people in Chicago. I think its subjective, and it depends a lot on their perception of you. I found that foreign immigrants like students going to schools do not mix in as well as born Americans and it feels segregated. But when it comes to politeness, I definitely see it more around here than in NYC.
Of course it is subjective, but I found that, in contrast to other cities I've lived in or spent a lot of time in (Minneapolis, Indianapolis, Portland, Seattle), that native Chicagoans are more willing to make new friends. I'm a white, native-born American, but my significant other was an international student in Chicago when we met. We seem to have "mixed" just fine. Of course, plenty of international people I've met have told me I'm not the typical American, which I would agree with, so your mileage may vary.
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Old 04-30-2012, 06:38 PM
 
389 posts, read 409,583 times
Reputation: 117
Quote:
Originally Posted by emathias View Post
Of course it is subjective, but I found that, in contrast to other cities I've lived in or spent a lot of time in (Minneapolis, Indianapolis, Portland, Seattle), that native Chicagoans are more willing to make new friends. I'm a white, native-born American, but my significant other was an international student in Chicago when we met. We seem to have "mixed" just fine. Of course, plenty of international people I've met have told me I'm not the typical American, which I would agree with, so your mileage may vary.
Ok I probably never had too much chance and opportunity to meet with a lot of native born Chicagoans, I went to college there and most folks I hung out with came from over all places, mostly Midwest - like Wisconsin, Michigan, Chicago suburbs, southern Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, etc.
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Old 04-30-2012, 07:18 PM
 
Location: NYC and Chicago
11,091 posts, read 7,314,228 times
Reputation: 3980
Quote:
Originally Posted by mayhem_223 View Post
I'd consider moving to SF/SJ or washington dc if I at least got 20,000/y more than what I get paid now. If I found a good job in federal sector that has more rewarding perks or benefits than most companies in private sector, I'd sure go to Washington DC. I would not know however if it would be better to live on VA or MD but I think MD is better though more expensive.

If I were to live in LA, I'd live somewhere in suburbs away from the city near beaches.

I think I would need to earn minimum $100k to live a decent life in NYC.
I like San Fran and Washington and could move there no doubt. Washington is nice too but I still like Chicago the best out of all of those..I'm a CITY fan and Chicago is the best out of that, followed by San Fran, then Washington. Still more expensive, but if I move anywhere next, it's going to because I decided to go to Google or some startup out there (which is attractive to me).

But anyway, 100k you can have a decent life in NYC, but you probably could barely live in a nice place in Manhattan with space and 0/little roommates. If you want a nice life in Manhattan in a nice area I bet you'd need at least 150k-200k.
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Old 04-30-2012, 07:44 PM
 
85 posts, read 178,234 times
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I agree with everyone else, the #1 reason is cost. However, even after that I feel like NYC might be a bit 'much' for me. Chicago is a world class city and I can afford to live here, and still throw a few bucks aside for a rainy day. It has just about everything I love.. sports, great dining, hole in the wall restaurants, bars, a diverse economy all while being semi close to the country. We are light in the brewery category (but getting better), nowhere near any mountains (I like to snowboard and hike) weather can suck, and country music is lacking. But I'm willing to live with these
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Old 04-30-2012, 08:53 PM
 
Location: Chicago
36,355 posts, read 57,054,102 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WesleyPrescott View Post
My question is: Why would you choose Chicago over other major cities in the United States? Specifically NYC. I am not trying to make this a turf war of any sort. Just curious to see some other viewpoints. I personally want to move to Chicago.

Why would you?
Consider what it costs to have a solid quality of life in NYC. Then compare what it costs to get the same QOL in Chicago. There's your answer.
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Old 05-01-2012, 12:04 AM
 
Location: Chicago
222 posts, read 210,586 times
Reputation: 167
For me, NYC is just way too far away from the extended family. Here anytime I want on a last minute whim I can just rent a car and be at my sister's house hanging out with my nephews. But I still here live in a world class city. Actually I have never even visited NYC and I really would like to (except there's always this thing called California that eats my vacation days and travel budget).

No matter how awesome NYC may be it will never have the convenience of being close to the lily pad white-bred midwestern caucasian family that spawned and raised me.
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Old 05-01-2012, 03:38 AM
 
909 posts, read 750,319 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marothisu View Post
Less expensive is a big one. My apt in the Gold Coast would cost probably $4000/month in Manhattan for example and I pay less than $1400/month for mine. HUGE difference. While a few of the arts "scenes" in Chicago aren't as good as NYC, Chicago still offers pretty much everything NYC does.
actually, saying that the "arts scenes in Chicago aren't as good as NYC" just isn't true. If we're talking about fine art, NY has a MUCH larger commercial art market and a larger international presence, BUT, Chicago has a huge apartment gallery scene (a result of the number of artists vs galleries ratio) with an astronomical number of active, serious and engaged artists working, which a lot of the time produces a far more compelling scene than one based more on market forces. Chicago's art scene is driven more by its strong educational institutions (SAIC, UIC, U of C, Northwestern...) and it's museums, than the market and dealers... and is better off for it. What makes Chicago a perfect place for the practicing artist is the cost of living, while still functioning in a critically engaged and internationally connected city where art is serious. A lot of artists here manages to work a day job, find time to make art and pay for a studio space, and still find time to live a normal life. A lot of artists go to NY thinking they are going to art heaven where they will be discovered end up working 3 jobs to pay for their 100sf apartment and end up never making art. This is why the art scene is so strong in Chicago, because normal people can live and make work that matters without the pressures of the market or worrying about rent... You just don't get that as much in NY.
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Old 05-01-2012, 04:00 AM
 
909 posts, read 750,319 times
Reputation: 408
As for choosing a city, both NY and Chicago have there pros and cons, and the pros of Chicago out weigh the cons for me personally. I love the feel and pace of NY, the international and metropolitan feel of the city... Like London. It's one of those places where you could come from Amsterdam, get off the plane, and not feel out of place... It's really a place where everyone is from everywhere, and its integrated. Those are some of the things I look for in an international city.

For Chicago, I feel like (as everyone else has already mentioned) you get a lot of the things you can find in NY at a fraction of the cost, but the big thing for me is really the higher standard of daily living, and the ease of life that wins me over. Being able to live in a gorgeous and curturally diverse suburb like Oak Park, but also have the ability to drive to the loop in 15 to 20 minutes to take advantage of all its offerings, is something that's just non-existent for the regular person in NY or London. Just small things like parking at a Whole Foods and loading things into the car are conveniences that make life so much easier, where as a lot of people have to walk home, or travel via bus to bring bags of shopping home in NY. Though Chicago is very diverse, NY feels more integrated on the whole.

Both have their good and bad, but I would choose Chicago based on quality and ease of life while still having things a big city should.
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