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Old 02-19-2015, 11:40 AM
 
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Apparently Milwaukee's north shore is very similar to Chicago's. What are some of the differences between them?
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Old 02-19-2015, 01:21 PM
 
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The biggest difference is probably the respective cities that they anchor and the scale of these areas. Chicago's North Shore is a considerably larger area than Milwaukee's North Shore. People can correct me if I'm wrong here but I also think that Chicago's North Shore is generally more expensive than Milwaukee's North Shore as well. It is all relative, however. This post oughtta be moved to the Chicago Suburbs section.

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Originally Posted by 4122 View Post
Apparently Milwaukee's north shore is very similar to Chicago's. What are some of the differences between them?
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Old 02-19-2015, 02:57 PM
 
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Originally Posted by reppin_the_847 View Post
The biggest difference is probably the respective cities that they anchor and the scale of these areas. Chicago's North Shore is a considerably larger area than Milwaukee's North Shore. People can correct me if I'm wrong here but I also think that Chicago's North Shore is generally more expensive than Milwaukee's North Shore as well. It is all relative, however. This post oughtta be moved to the Chicago Suburbs section.


Thanks for letting me know. I was debating whether to put it on the Chicago forum or the Chicago Suburbs forum.
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Old 02-19-2015, 03:04 PM
 
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Chicago's north shore suburbs are further south than Milwaukee's north shore suburbs.
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Old 02-19-2015, 10:28 PM
 
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They are indeed very similar. Both contain arguably the most desirable real estate in their respective areas and both have a lot of housing stock mainly from the early 1900s closer in generally getting newer the further north you go. Milwaukee is far, far cheaper for comparable homes. Taxes are high.

One difference is that in Milwaukee most lakefront properties are actually on the main thoroughfare whereas in Chicago they tend to be a bit more hidden. For this reason I find Milwaukee to be more scenic driving through but that seems a drawback in terms of actually living there. Milwaukee's north shore commercial areas seem a bit underdeveloped compared to Chicago, and there are a lot of jobs adjacent to Chicago north shore burbs along the I-94 corridor which is less true in Milwaukee along I-43. Also Milwaukee lacks a suburban marina. Finally there is no equivalent of Waukegan along Milwaukee's north shore.
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Old 02-20-2015, 07:20 AM
 
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Originally Posted by svicious22 View Post
Milwaukee lacks a suburban marina.
Port Washington
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Old 02-20-2015, 07:23 AM
 
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I think Milwaukee's North Shore offers a great bang-for-the-buck in terms of amenities and feel. The towns of Shorewood and Whitefish Bay feel very similar to parts of Evanston and Wilmette, and there are some great lakefront estates as well. Older charming homes line tree-lined streets. There are nice little suburban downtown areas. Access to shopping at Bayshore Town Center is a plus, and you can't beat the travel times to Milwaukee. The schools are great. Sendik's. I miss Sendik's.

One advantage it has is that it's quite a bit closer to Milwaukee's very nice "East Side" neighborhood than Chicago's North Shore is to the trendy North Side neighborhoods. And even though Milwaukee's downtown isn't a huge employment center these days, the North Shore is a really quick commute to downtown Milwaukee. Like ten minutes quick. And you can even bike it on a former rail line converted bike path. Everything is just on a smaller, easier to transverse scale that is convenient and easy.

I am a big Milwaukee booster, and would have no qualms about living there if the employment prospects were better for my wife and I. But it's a small job market that hasn't grown much in recent decades. If you have a secure job as a doctor or something else with guaranteed high salaries, it would be great. My industry isn't as strong there as it is in Chicago, and neither is my wife's.
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Old 02-20-2015, 08:21 AM
 
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Default Yep, the "thinness" is almost dangerous...

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Originally Posted by Lookout Kid View Post
I think Milwaukee's North Shore offers a great bang-for-the-buck in terms of amenities and feel. The towns of Shorewood and Whitefish Bay feel very similar to parts of Evanston and Wilmette, and there are some great lakefront estates as well. Older charming homes line tree-lined streets. There are nice little suburban downtown areas. Access to shopping at Bayshore Town Center is a plus, and you can't beat the travel times to Milwaukee. The schools are great. Sendik's. I miss Sendik's.

One advantage it has is that it's quite a bit closer to Milwaukee's very nice "East Side" neighborhood than Chicago's North Shore is to the trendy North Side neighborhoods. And even though Milwaukee's downtown isn't a huge employment center these days, the North Shore is a really quick commute to downtown Milwaukee. Like ten minutes quick. And you can even bike it on a former rail line converted bike path. Everything is just on a smaller, easier to transverse scale that is convenient and easy.

I am a big Milwaukee booster, and would have no qualms about living there if the employment prospects were better for my wife and I. But it's a small job market that hasn't grown much in recent decades. If you have a secure job as a doctor or something else with guaranteed high salaries, it would be great. My industry isn't as strong there as it is in Chicago, and neither is my wife's.
I have relatives that live in the suburbs north of Milwaukee and literally the entire area was really hurt when just ONE locally based mutual fund ran into problems. Folks that worked for Strong Funds and had their retirement and/or kids college savings all put at risk were rightly nervous that they'd all face severe changes and have no alternatives. Fortunately the majority of folks that did not panic managed to hook up with other firms in related sectors but more than a few high flying risk takers did get hit very hard. The domino effect of tumbling prices as the biggest homes hit the market very quickly knocked lots of value out of the market and even for folks that did diversify to other funds has had some serious repercussions.

While I doubt the negatives could ever be as severe as someplace like Detroit with its reliance on automakers the fact that each sector of Milwaukee's economy has far fewer dominant firms does give one pause. For as much as I worry about the reliance of Chicago on the firms related to CME/CBOT/CBOE we do have a wide range of firms engaged in running healthcare, consumer goods, financial services, media/ advertising, aerospace and other sectors that do underpin a much broader range of high paying jobs and have shown resiliency.
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Old 02-20-2015, 10:35 AM
 
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I'd have to say, from visiting Milwaukee while living in Madison, that the North Shore is quite nice, more affordable, and has exquisite views of Lake Michigan that are much better than Boston's view of the Atlantic ( IMHO)...
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Old 02-20-2015, 11:04 AM
 
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I'm pretty sure Chicago's North Shore only has one marina too.
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