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View Poll Results: Is creating a habit for rare or endangered seals in the Great Lakes a good idea?
1. No, that is crazy and immoral. 1 10.00%
2. No, I prefer the current mix of invasive species. 2 20.00%
3. Yes, but entirely unfeasible. 2 20.00%
4. Yes, where do we start? 5 50.00%
Voters: 10. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
Old 05-01-2015, 02:44 PM
 
61 posts, read 87,414 times
Reputation: 82

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The natural Great Lakes ecosystem has been destroyed and changed forever through invasive species. This unbalanced and ever changing ecosystem is tragic and irreversible, although inevitable it seems with the arrival of giant cities and ocean going vessels.

In my opinion, the damage has been done, so we might as well make the best of a bad situation by making the Great Lakes a refuge for some of the most majestic and endangered fresh water animals in the world....seals. There are a few types of fresh water seals around the world, none of them have very large numbers and some are endangered.

I think we should introduce the Iliamna Lake Seal or Baikal Seal and it's natural prey to the Great Lakes. The Great Lakes could be perfect for some small colonies of seals to thrive in. Instead of watching seals at the Shedd Aquarium, you could hop over to the harbor and watch them yourself. Every child that sees these seals will learn about how they were saved from possible extinction thanks to humans.

I know I would rather have the Great Lakes caters to the rare freshwater seal and not Zebra mussels and asian carp.

Is creating a habit for rare or endangered seals in the Great Lakes a good idea?
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Old 05-01-2015, 03:22 PM
 
2,250 posts, read 2,203,395 times
Reputation: 1501
Do it! We need some more exciting "sealife" on the lakes. Maybe people will begin to think of the Lakes more as Seas then than Lakes (I'm sorry but to me the Great Lakes are Seas).
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Old 05-01-2015, 03:40 PM
 
Location: Raccoon City
819 posts, read 1,102,673 times
Reputation: 1325
Sounds interesting. Maybe they could provide an area for them if they complete the Northerly Island Ecological Habitat if the climate is suitable. I'm already really proud of the work they've done at the Midewin Prairie and the return of bison to Illinois.


Last edited by thefallensrvnge; 05-01-2015 at 03:48 PM..
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Old 05-01-2015, 04:31 PM
 
Location: River North, Chicago, Illinois
4,507 posts, read 6,748,771 times
Reputation: 6066
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jorge Bueno View Post
The natural Great Lakes ecosystem has been destroyed and changed forever through invasive species. This unbalanced and ever changing ecosystem is tragic and irreversible, although inevitable it seems with the arrival of giant cities and ocean going vessels.

In my opinion, the damage has been done, so we might as well make the best of a bad situation by making the Great Lakes a refuge for some of the most majestic and endangered fresh water animals in the world....seals. There are a few types of fresh water seals around the world, none of them have very large numbers and some are endangered.

I think we should introduce the Iliamna Lake Seal or Baikal Seal and it's natural prey to the Great Lakes. The Great Lakes could be perfect for some small colonies of seals to thrive in. Instead of watching seals at the Shedd Aquarium, you could hop over to the harbor and watch them yourself. Every child that sees these seals will learn about how they were saved from possible extinction thanks to humans.

I know I would rather have the Great Lakes caters to the rare freshwater seal and not Zebra mussels and asian carp.

Is creating a habit for rare or endangered seals in the Great Lakes a good idea?
It'd be cool, but I think the Lake might need some pretty intensive fish stocking.
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Old 05-01-2015, 05:57 PM
 
Location: Chicago
38,690 posts, read 90,485,911 times
Reputation: 29499
Quote:
Originally Posted by emathias View Post
It'd be cool, but I think the Lake might need some pretty intensive fish stocking.
Sooner or later it'll be plenty stocked with Asian carp.
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