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Old 09-05-2016, 08:33 AM
 
56 posts, read 39,241 times
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@Aberdeen: I'll drive through there and see what it's like.

@chet: The figures were examples. Most Canaryville residents are city employees. Living "under the radar" would not hide them from the IRS.

@Neal: I had a lot of money saved before returning to Chicago. A temp agency hooked me up with a decent paying job, and I'm supposed to go permanent soon. Most of my moving cash is unspent; that leaves me with enough for a low FHA downpayment. Finding a place to set roots makes sense at this point.
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Old 09-05-2016, 08:56 PM
 
Location: Chatham, Chicago
700 posts, read 511,707 times
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if it's just me, I'd prefer bronzeville since it has easy green and red line access.

I also like mckinley park since it's close to bridgeport, the orange line and the stevenson.

I do not like brighton park at all though.

I'm black so I would never consider canaryville in new city for me.
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Old 09-06-2016, 10:07 AM
 
28,441 posts, read 71,116,466 times
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I have no idea why the OP would assume most Canaryville residents are city employees. In my experience, folks that work for the City of Chicago in most capacities tend to live in parts of Chicago that are much better, often along the SW or NW sides. Even if there were some large percentage of city workers in Canaryville (which I have no source to confirm...) the excellent compensation that many enjoy would suggest that home ownership would be preferred over renting. THE WATCHDOGS: A third of Chicago city workers make $100K or more | Chicago Sun-Times

There is little reason for anyone that does not already have ties to Canaryville to consider living there. Though the space might be a well priced the obvious downsides of living in an area that screams "dead end" are hard to ignore. Access to the L is poor, schools are terrible, work locations are geared to dying industries...


https://www.redfin.com/IL/Chicago/61.../home/13958266
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Old 09-06-2016, 12:47 PM
 
Location: Chatham, Chicago
700 posts, read 511,707 times
Reputation: 518
Quote:
Originally Posted by chet everett View Post
I have no idea why the OP would assume most Canaryville residents are city employees. In my experience, folks that work for the City of Chicago in most capacities tend to live in parts of Chicago that are much better, often along the SW or NW sides. Even if there were some large percentage of city workers in Canaryville (which I have no source to confirm...) the excellent compensation that many enjoy would suggest that home ownership would be preferred over renting. THE WATCHDOGS: A third of Chicago city workers make $100K or more | Chicago Sun-Times

There is little reason for anyone that does not already have ties to Canaryville to consider living there. Though the space might be a well priced the obvious downsides of living in an area that screams "dead end" are hard to ignore. Access to the L is poor, schools are terrible, work locations are geared to dying industries...


https://www.redfin.com/IL/Chicago/61.../home/13958266
I do not like the southwest or northwest sides. the south west side is sooo far from most of the expressways. especially if you live somewhere like mt greenwood.

and the northwest side (like edison park) is off the kennedy, and if you have to drive that pretty much any time of the day, it's a traffic nightmare.
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Old 09-06-2016, 02:52 PM
 
56 posts, read 39,241 times
Reputation: 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by chet everett View Post
I have no idea why the OP would assume most Canaryville residents are city employees. In my experience, folks that work for the City of Chicago in most capacities tend to live in parts of Chicago that are much better, often along the SW or NW sides. Even if there were some large percentage of city workers in Canaryville (which I have no source to confirm...) the excellent compensation that many enjoy would suggest that home ownership would be preferred over renting. THE WATCHDOGS: A third of Chicago city workers make $100K or more | Chicago Sun-Times

There is little reason for anyone that does not already have ties to Canaryville to consider living there. Though the space might be a well priced the obvious downsides of living in an area that screams "dead end" are hard to ignore. Access to the L is poor, schools are terrible, work locations are geared to dying industries...


https://www.redfin.com/IL/Chicago/61.../home/13958266
I see your points, but, by perusing the City's job boards, there are plenty of positions that pay far less than $100,000.

There are two Redline stations nearby: 35th and 47th.

The neighborhood is bordered by Halsted on the west and Wentworth on the east, which both have dedicated bus lines that run downtown.

I'm not assuming that Canaryville residents work for the city. I've done some research and come across numerous testimonials about the neighborhood from past and present residents who point out that, in addition to the employees of Chicago's lingering industrial companies, many stay in the neighborhood to fulfill residency requirements for municipal jobs. Most of the residents send their kids to parochial schools, some of which I encountered during my time at Saint Ignatius.

According to census data, there are renters in the neighborhood. Patronage corrupts the city hiring process to such a degree that it's not difficult to believe that jobs, like houses, are handed down from family member to family member. Not everyone wants to live with their parents until they die and inherit the house.

Chinatown, Bridgeport, McKinley Park and, to a lesser extent, Brighton Park are gentrifying, as well as Bronzeville. With the influx of Chinese nationals moving in, it's difficult to call the South Side a dead end.
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Old 09-06-2016, 03:37 PM
 
28,441 posts, read 71,116,466 times
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The 35th Street L is in Bridgeport, I often take that train to the Sox games. Less frequently I have used it to get to events near IIT -- huge difference between folks at 35th St and further south. The 47th St Red Line is in Grand Blvd, significantly more crime and a place typically avoided...

Just because there is a bus that runs along Halsted does not make it convenient or desirable for commuting to the Loop. Despite the fact that Canaryville is less than 5 miles to the Loop the configuration of the L and even moreso the bus lines means you'd be lucky to get from point to point in 30 minutes. I would caution that such things are a huge impediment to the neighborhood's desirability.
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Old 09-11-2016, 08:00 AM
 
Location: Chicago, Little Village
3,942 posts, read 7,224,428 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by COMKitty View Post
Originally I was only considering McKinley Park and Bronzeville, but found some decent deals in Portage and Brighton, which aren't too far from public transportation. Little Village is accessible by Pink Line and has been near the point of gentrifying since a decade ago when I was in a punk band with a fellow from the neighborhood.

My only concern is the safety of Brighton Park and Little Village. Canaryville has its issues, but it's never been unstable. I went to Saint Ignatius and knew of Canaryville from some of my Bridgeport friends.

The plan is to find a decent location and live in one of the units while renting the other/s to pay the mortgage and, if I'm lucky, my utilities.

What do you think my chances are of finding good tenants? South Siders don't call the cops. Is Canaryville worse than the statistics tell? What about Brighton Park and Little Village?
There are three major gentrification epicenters right now: Logan Square, Pilsen, and to a lesser extent, Bridgeport. This is happening as the Emerald City pushes in all directions as the monied class moves back into the city. My picks for gentrification:

1. Little Village: Pink Line, Lagunitas, Pilsen, Riot Fest, the proposed improvements to Douglas Park, the growth of the UIC/Medical District, and the growth of the West Loop as a business corridor are all factors which give this usually not thought of area an advantage. It's also very affordable and has a lot of multi-unit properties for investors to buy, and hipsters are renting them. It's only a matter of time before investors discover this.

2. Humboldt Park: It's really "already there" in the sense that it's hard to get good deals because speculator money is flooding in. I'm a little baffled by this due to the limited public transit options but there seems to be no stopping it. It's hot. The only question is how far the gentrification will extend. Right now, it's clustered around the park and the northern portion near LS. The west side of HP is still very gritty and high crime, so I'm not sure the whole neighborhood is going to benefit, but I think it'll go pretty far due to the momentum being created.

3. Avondale: It's benefitted from the Logan Square gentrification and I see it continuing to improve. But it's already so expensive, I can't consider it a "gentrification" candidate per say. Not much bang for the buck for an investor but it will continue to blend into Logan Square demographically.

4. McKinley Park: Bridgeport is clearly gentrifying but at a slower pace than Pilsen and Logan Square, so there isn't imminent spillover off the sides, and there's a physical industrial "buffer" between the east side of McKinley and the west side of Bridgeport after you cross the river. McKinley Park seems like a peaceful, quiet, working class neighborhood. I see it staying stable, but see it becoming more of a destination for Chinese, Hispanic and probably some Caucasian families than the types of young professionals, hipsters and artists who fuel gentrification.
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Old 09-23-2016, 05:29 PM
 
56 posts, read 39,241 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BRU67 View Post
There are three major gentrification epicenters right now: Logan Square, Pilsen, and to a lesser extent, Bridgeport. This is happening as the Emerald City pushes in all directions as the monied class moves back into the city. My picks for gentrification:

1. Little Village: Pink Line, Lagunitas, Pilsen, Riot Fest, the proposed improvements to Douglas Park, the growth of the UIC/Medical District, and the growth of the West Loop as a business corridor are all factors which give this usually not thought of area an advantage. It's also very affordable and has a lot of multi-unit properties for investors to buy, and hipsters are renting them. It's only a matter of time before investors discover this.

2. Humboldt Park: It's really "already there" in the sense that it's hard to get good deals because speculator money is flooding in. I'm a little baffled by this due to the limited public transit options but there seems to be no stopping it. It's hot. The only question is how far the gentrification will extend. Right now, it's clustered around the park and the northern portion near LS. The west side of HP is still very gritty and high crime, so I'm not sure the whole neighborhood is going to benefit, but I think it'll go pretty far due to the momentum being created.

3. Avondale: It's benefitted from the Logan Square gentrification and I see it continuing to improve. But it's already so expensive, I can't consider it a "gentrification" candidate per say. Not much bang for the buck for an investor but it will continue to blend into Logan Square demographically.

4. McKinley Park: Bridgeport is clearly gentrifying but at a slower pace than Pilsen and Logan Square, so there isn't imminent spillover off the sides, and there's a physical industrial "buffer" between the east side of McKinley and the west side of Bridgeport after you cross the river. McKinley Park seems like a peaceful, quiet, working class neighborhood. I see it staying stable, but see it becoming more of a destination for Chinese, Hispanic and probably some Caucasian families than the types of young professionals, hipsters and artists who fuel gentrification.
Good points. McKinley Park will turn into more of a destination when hipsters grow up and have kids. They'll look for more family oriented communities that are disconnected from the noise and activity of hip areas. Think Lincoln Park's residential sections.
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Old 09-23-2016, 05:32 PM
 
56 posts, read 39,241 times
Reputation: 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by chet everett View Post
The 35th Street L is in Bridgeport, I often take that train to the Sox games. Less frequently I have used it to get to events near IIT -- huge difference between folks at 35th St and further south. The 47th St Red Line is in Grand Blvd, significantly more crime and a place typically avoided...

Just because there is a bus that runs along Halsted does not make it convenient or desirable for commuting to the Loop. Despite the fact that Canaryville is less than 5 miles to the Loop the configuration of the L and even moreso the bus lines means you'd be lucky to get from point to point in 30 minutes. I would caution that such things are a huge impediment to the neighborhood's desirability.
Bridgeport is adjacent to Canaryville. The 35th Street Station is on the eastern boundary near some rough patches of the near south side. I've been to the 47th Street Station. It's not the best, but it's far from the worst. Both are walking distance from the neighborhood.

Canaryville is actually closer to 6.5 miles from The Loop. By public transportation, it takes as long to get there as from Edgewater and Rogers Park, both affordable communities that are in the process of gentrification.
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