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Old 03-07-2009, 01:50 AM
 
Location: Chicago
15,589 posts, read 13,262,455 times
Reputation: 1761

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Quote:
Originally Posted by eevee View Post
sigh, now we're going to differentiate between "energy" bars and "protein" bars?

Again, i'm just debating you on what you so boldly stated, and you were wrong, unless you can find a $1 protein bar w/ low enough sugar to be deemed healthy by most people. Good night
Are you blind?

Quote:
Originally Posted by skipcromer View Post
Two Double Cheesburgers = 2 Dollars. Can you find me a comparable and healthy food at the grocery store for the same price?
Quote:
Originally Posted by avengerfire View Post
two protein bars. You are welcome.
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Old 03-07-2009, 01:52 AM
 
Location: Chicago
5,561 posts, read 8,983,552 times
Reputation: 5940
Quote:
Originally Posted by Avengerfire View Post
Oh quit nitpicking and distorting.

I never said every protein bar was more healthy than a double cheeseburger. God you don't want to lose this argument do you, even though you lost as soon as you challenged my original statement.

The site I picked the nutritional stats off of is selling the bars for the price you mentioned. Walk into Dominick's,Jewel,CVS,Walgreen's,etc any day of the week and they have comparable bars to the one I mentioned on sale for a buck or so.

*sigh*

Quote:
Originally Posted by skipcromer View Post
Two Double Cheesburgers = 2 Dollars. Can you find me a comparable and healthy food at the grocery store for the same price?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Avengerfire View Post
Two protein bars. You are welcome.
Quote:
Originally Posted by eevee View Post
most protein bars aren't that healthy, especially the cheap $1 ones (way too much sugar, some have HFCS, etc). most protein bars= glorified candy bars
Quote:
Originally Posted by Avengerfire View Post
Even the worst protein bar is way more healthy than a cheeseburger and you can take that to the bank.
Quote:
Originally Posted by eevee View Post
yeah, but it's not healthy, which was the point of the original question. replacing one unhealthy food item w/ a slightly less unhealthy food item isn't going to help the situation. hell, I can make a cheeseburger better than most protein bars just by asking for tomato and lettuce, or by taking off the cheese
sweet dreams
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Old 03-07-2009, 01:54 AM
 
Location: Chicago
15,589 posts, read 13,262,455 times
Reputation: 1761
Whatever.
You must be delusional.
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Old 03-07-2009, 02:06 AM
 
Location: Chicago
36,599 posts, read 57,896,760 times
Reputation: 25614
OK, I think it's time to unsubscribe from this thread....
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Old 03-07-2009, 10:37 AM
 
131 posts, read 236,490 times
Reputation: 39
I wonder what it's like to always be right.
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Old 03-07-2009, 11:14 AM
 
Location: Oak Park, IL
5,263 posts, read 8,274,104 times
Reputation: 3324
Quote:
Originally Posted by icebergsyndrome View Post
I wonder what it's like to always be right.
Once I thought I was wrong, but I was mistaken about that.
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Old 03-07-2009, 11:50 AM
 
Location: Chicago
5,561 posts, read 8,983,552 times
Reputation: 5940
The Columbia Chronicle Oasis coming to ‘food desert’

looks like there is a company willing to open up a supermarket in a low income neighborhood. be interesting to see how it does and whether it may expand to other "food deserts"
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Old 03-07-2009, 01:58 PM
 
Location: Humboldt Park, Chicago
2,358 posts, read 4,970,716 times
Reputation: 786
Default the title of this thread is wrong

Latinos support grocery stores such as Tonys and Cermak in Humboldt Park.

Other than Aldis and corner stores you do not see grocery stores in poor black areas.

The solution is to stop paying food stamps for junk food. If you limit food stamps to just milk, eggs. vegetables, etc., poor people will be forced to eat healthier. I know many will still sell their food stamps for cash and still buy junk but this should help promote healthy living.

Also, it will save me tax dollars as the will be using less free medical care.

I still say limiting poor population growth is the real solution to poverty but paying less for those who are already here is about all we can do for now.
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Old 03-07-2009, 02:59 PM
 
Location: Shaw, St. Louis/West Ridge, Chicago/WuDaoKou, Beijing
292 posts, read 545,132 times
Reputation: 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by desperad0stl View Post
hmm...depends who you're talking about...
Personally I come from poor families from 2 cultures...
My mexican half would go to mexican markets and buy lots of vegetables, rice, and cheap meats and cook big pots of food once or twice a week to eat all week...healthy and cheap.
My black half only had corner markets and pete's shur sav market to shop at and they ate what was available...there was no such thing as fresh fruits and vegetables...we had grape drink and frozen pizzas that tasted like candy + ramen noodles...i grew up eating lots of ramen noodles with vienna sausages mixed in.

Both sides are doing better now both are eating better as well. My mother can now afford to buy steaks, fresh vegetables, fresh chicken and fruit and thats what she and my little bro eat now.
Despite their solid financial status' today, my dad and grandmother still have the habit of cooking big pots for cheap today and I also have a healthy variety of quick things to eat when I visit.

When it comes to my Grandparents on my mom's side though, they've been in the same poor neighborhoods their entire lives and they've spent 70 years eating the same food...they crave bad food and they eat bad food. They're reluctant to try anything new because they never had the option. I always poke fun at them and try to get them to try new things but everything I present them with is strange, gross or nasty...since most of us grew up in fairly well off households we all had the means to try new things and money opens up doors to exposure.
Education may be a factor but both of my parents are High School drop outs, It seems that they had enough sense to buy healthy food and exercise once they had the means and time to do so.

I think big grocery stores don't make it in poor neighborhoods not because people are uneducated but because they've only had a few options and most of them have been unhealthy...Their minds and bodies crave that same crap that they've been eating their entire lives.
It's easy for most of us to grasp the concept of eating well no matter where we live because we've been exposed to healthy alternatives. If the same old crap is what's in demand then the same old crap is what poor people will be presented with.
There are plenty of dirt poor uneducated immigrants in Chicago but they brought their healthy cheap options with + they opened their own grocery stores as well.

I took after the culture that thinks grocery stores are stupid.. I do the giant pots and roasts thing on Sundays as I am a dirt poor college student...I go to restaurant depot and buy 10 lb bags of meat and vegetables and make big pots of stuff because that's the culture I was raised around...my cousin and I (aka roommate) eat healthier than most people for less than $200 a month combined.
Going to the corner store or gas station to buy a bag of doritos and ho hos + a soda could be my first choice, if that was the only culture i was raised in and formed habits from.

Therefore, I can come back and say...why do all of you make such poor choices and spend too much money on processed and pre-packaged products? Why do you buy coca cola with high fructose corn syrup from the grocery store instead of the coca cola from the mexican market with pure cane sugar?
Was it the culture you were raised in your whole lives and don't know any better? The grocery stores see this habit and they pounce on it...its all business and it's part of your culture.

The "grocery store" is the Asian, Mexican, African market equivalent for middle and upper class (and mostly white) America...it's your own market.
Trust me I'm not going to start buying your disgusting gringo salsa,gross (+ unhealthy) flour tortillas, weird americanized chinese food, and gross processed cheeses that are sold in the grocery stores...that stuff is catered to you guys. Sadly unhealthy food is part of poor urban american culture.

once again...it's cultural...poor people generally aren't open minded.
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Old 03-07-2009, 06:40 PM
 
Location: Chicago
36,599 posts, read 57,896,760 times
Reputation: 25614
Quote:
Originally Posted by eevee View Post
The Columbia Chronicle Oasis coming to ‘food desert’

looks like there is a company willing to open up a supermarket in a low income neighborhood. be interesting to see how it does and whether it may expand to other "food deserts"
It's obvious the people who wrote this article are not from Chicago and have no idea what is going on in the Bronzeville neighborhood. For starters, Bronzeville is not strictly a "low-income" neighborhood any more. There has been substantial residential redevelopment in the area, and the fact that a grocery store would follow residential redevelopment follows the typical pattern of neighborhood redevelopment. Second, as for this supposedly being a food desert, there's already a Jewel in the Lake Meadows Shopping Center at 35th and King, which is only 4 or 5 blocks away. There's also a Sav-A-Lot on 47th and Cottage Grove, 8 blocks in the other direction.

EDIT: OK, I read the rest of the article... They acknowledge there's a Jewel at 35th and King but say people complain the prices are too high. I used to live in Wisconsin and I've shopped at various Roundy's places. They are certainly no cheaper than Jewel (at least in urban/metropolitan areas), and in some cases such as Copp's, they are even more expensive.

Last edited by Drover; 03-07-2009 at 06:52 PM..
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