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Old 07-05-2019, 08:48 AM
 
Location: New England
32,496 posts, read 21,322,228 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mensaguy View Post
It's taken 250 years, but we're finally learning to make some decent beers. Some are even better than decent.
Mensaguy, i agree, there is so many great beers here now, but English Cask Ales can't be matched. You chill English Ales and you ruin them . Other than family that English ale is what i miss. Heading there this weekend for a wedding, so i will have my fair share
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Old 07-05-2019, 08:50 AM
 
Location: New England
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
I wonder if my great X X X grandfather fought in the Revolutionary War, only for your side.

The people whose last name I carry didn't come here (from Manchester) until 1863.

I know where to go to get good beer, though.
Manchester is 1 hour north of my home town. Staying there for a day on our way back.
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Old 07-05-2019, 10:00 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,998 posts, read 55,300,483 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pcamps View Post
Manchester is 1 hour north of my home town. Staying there for a day on our way back.
I hope to visit it someday. I have only ever been to London.

My last name is quite the common English surname. You would recognize it immediately.

It was interesting that they emigrated during the Civil War. Who moves to a country at war?

Well, the Yankee blockade was keeping southern cotton from reaching England, and they were cotton mill workers in Manchester. They moved to Paterson, NJ, which had a thriving silk mill industry. It was a young married couple and their infant son.

The infant was my great-grandfather. My grandparents met working in the silk mills and married in 1914, but the Paterson silk industry failed during the Japanese invasion of China in the '30s, and my grandfather went to work for the railroad. I grew up about 15 miles from Paterson.

Funny how we can sometimes trace our ancestors' connection to history.
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Old 07-05-2019, 10:55 AM
 
Location: New England
32,496 posts, read 21,322,228 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
I hope to visit it someday. I have only ever been to London.

My last name is quite the common English surname. You would recognize it immediately.

It was interesting that they emigrated during the Civil War. Who moves to a country at war?

Well, the Yankee blockade was keeping southern cotton from reaching England, and they were cotton mill workers in Manchester. They moved to Paterson, NJ, which had a thriving silk mill industry. It was a young married couple and their infant son.

The infant was my great-grandfather. My grandparents met working in the silk mills and married in 1914, but the Paterson silk industry failed during the Japanese invasion of China in the '30s, and my grandfather went to work for the railroad. I grew up about 15 miles from Paterson.

Funny how we can sometimes trace our ancestors' connection to history.
Cool story. Yes, who moves to a country at war?, i'm sure they never regretted doing it. People in general from Lancashire are very friendly, same goes for most northern England counties.
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Old 07-05-2019, 11:09 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,998 posts, read 55,300,483 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pcamps View Post
Cool story. Yes, who moves to a country at war?, i'm sure they never regretted doing it. People in general from Lancashire are very friendly, same goes for most northern England counties.
It looks like an interesting city.

I like the one you live in on this side of the pond, too. You are in or near Providence, right? My niece moved there for a time, and we visited. Then she went to New Bedford, and she is now up in the Boston 'burbs.

I think she's lost her Jersey Girl status by now.
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Old 07-05-2019, 11:29 AM
 
Location: New England
32,496 posts, read 21,322,228 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
It looks like an interesting city.

I like the one you live in on this side of the pond, too. You are in or near Providence, right? My niece moved there for a time, and we visited. Then she went to New Bedford, and she is now up in the Boston 'burbs.

I think she's lost her Jersey Girl status by now.
30 mins from Providence on the penisula. Yes it's beautiful here. New Bedford of Moby Dick fame. Bet she never lost the accent.
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Old 07-05-2019, 12:17 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,998 posts, read 55,300,483 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pcamps View Post
30 mins from Providence on the penisula. Yes it's beautiful here. New Bedford of Moby Dick fame. Bet she never lost the accent.
Hahaha, people in New Jersey don't have an accent.

OK, maybe we do a little (Cawfee, tawk, dawg) but not the one shown on TV where we don't pronounce our "R"s or sound like the New Yawkers who starred on that stupid Jersey Shore show.

(You do know that if you come to NJ and say "Joisey", you might get slapped upside the head, right? I have lived in NJ for sixty years, and never once met anyone who pronounced the name of our state that way. It must have come from old Bowery Boys movies or something. No one is sure where that originated.)

After 16 or 17 years of New England, she has picked up some funny ways of talking. When my sister visited her last year, my niece asked her "Should I put on a pawt?" My sister was silent for a minute, and then said, "Are you asking me if I want a cup of tea?"
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Old 07-06-2019, 08:02 AM
 
Location: Somerset, KY
345 posts, read 49,193 times
Reputation: 154
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
Hahaha, people in New Jersey don't have an accent.

OK, maybe we do a little (Cawfee, tawk, dawg) but not the one shown on TV where we don't pronounce our "R"s or sound like the New Yawkers who starred on that stupid Jersey Shore show.

(You do know that if you come to NJ and say "Joisey", you might get slapped upside the head, right? I have lived in NJ for sixty years, and never once met anyone who pronounced the name of our state that way. It must have come from old Bowery Boys movies or something. No one is sure where that originated.)

After 16 or 17 years of New England, she has picked up some funny ways of talking. When my sister visited her last year, my niece asked her "Should I put on a pawt?" My sister was silent for a minute, and then said, "Are you asking me if I want a cup of tea?"
LOL. I was at the Newark airport a while back, and I was trying to get 4 quarters from a cashier. I do have somewhat of a "redneck from Kentucky" accent, but I didn't think it was that bad. I asked her several times for 4 quarters.

Finally, I got frustrated and said, "What do you think I want 4 of for a dollar bill?"

She said, "Oh, 4 QUOITERS," like she was trying to teach me how to pronounce the word correctly.

I still laugh when I think about it.
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Old 07-06-2019, 08:35 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,998 posts, read 55,300,483 times
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Originally Posted by hball72 View Post
LOL. I was at the Newark airport a while back, and I was trying to get 4 quarters from a cashier. I do have somewhat of a "redneck from Kentucky" accent, but I didn't think it was that bad. I asked her several times for 4 quarters.

Finally, I got frustrated and said, "What do you think I want 4 of for a dollar bill?"

She said, "Oh, 4 QUOITERS," like she was trying to teach me how to pronounce the word correctly.

I still laugh when I think about it.
That's hilarious, but likely she was from Brooklyn. That's not a Jersey accent. We would probably say something more like Kwawders. We get that awww thing going on.

Even Brooklyn is losing that old-time New Yawk accent.
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Old 07-06-2019, 12:43 PM
 
Location: Somerset, KY
345 posts, read 49,193 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
That's hilarious, but likely she was from Brooklyn. That's not a Jersey accent. We would probably say something more like Kwawders. We get that awww thing going on.

Even Brooklyn is losing that old-time New Yawk accent.
I have far worse problems with Spanish. I'm not anywhere close to fluent, but most of my Mexican friends in KY can understand me. In Guatemala, It's another story. Sometimes they give me strange looks. Apparently, I'm using slang from the area of Mexico that most of my friends are from, and I've picked up a little accent. I don't know Spanish well enough to be able to tell the difference. They also like to teach me words that shouldn't be used in polite company without telling me, because they think that it's hysterical to hear the preacher burn people's ears. (I always check Google translate now when they teach me something new.)

The worst error ever:
I'm very fond of a certain Salvadorian dish, but the name is slang for a female body part in Guatemala. No one told me this.
After church one day in Guatemala, I was talking about how much I like pupusas, and how much I wanted to go get some. Everyone was looking at me funny, except the pastor, who was laughing his arse off. He pulled me aside later and informed me of what I was saying.

DOH!
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