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Old 01-05-2011, 08:37 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dusty Rhodes View Post
I suspect it may be best if I just read this one and not take an active part.
Ain't that the truth I suspect I know some of the answers, things learned from living in the south all my life, and knowing the character of the people here. Plain, simple, hard working, stubborn, prideful people. These people have a tremendous amount of common sense, can fix or figure out just about anything. People that can build a barn, fix a tractor in a middle of a field with a crescent wrench and a pair of water pumps (channel locks), slaughter a pig, birth a calf, you name it, they can do it, and have done it.

Though they are likely only a few left today, I have met elderly that have never been more than 50 miles from their place of birth, and if they have it was probably only because of their service in the military.

Away from their religion, these are the some of the finest people I have met. You have to know how to approach and talk to them. Asking permission to hunt on their land (posted no hunting) is usually successful, *_if_* they are approached in the right way. I suspect there isn't a single person not from the south that would be successful. If they say 'no' you didn't waste your time asking again, as it is futile, and insulting to them.

Did I mention "stubborn" I don't think anyone has any concept of what stubborn really is until experienced talking to or working with these people. And it carries over into their religion. I would recommend that no one discuss religion with them, unless you go to the very same church, and know you are on the same page they are on.

 
Old 01-05-2011, 08:38 PM
 
Location: Sitting beside Walden Pond
4,610 posts, read 3,977,657 times
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Or maybe June should ask simple, direct questions instead of rambling so much.

Then she might get simple, direct answers.
 
Old 01-05-2011, 08:39 PM
 
10,452 posts, read 10,282,936 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by june 7th View Post
"Just June" hasn't exactly been to too many church services. We nonbelievers don't exactly tend to do such things. However, on a few ocassions "just June" just found herself attending a church service or two. (It was exactly two!) What she can't get over is the difference....Is there a "church culture" between what is done/believed in demographically, and therefore, how it is delivered, conveyed? "Just June" couldn't help but note the vast difference between the "delivery system" by which she experienced the service in the south....

It was at times authentic in terms of what the pastor was saying, and yet, there were aspects that so bespoke a different type of message...NOT a different message, per se (in terms of what June understands of Christianity) but the both the manner and literacy of what was conveyed....

(Does that make any sense?)

Maybe atheists should not travel to the south...
Having been to more than a handful of services, I can definitely tell you I observed that a lot of it is cultural. It's about talking the talk and walking the walk and feeling more and more secure in your beliefs cause others agree with you so it must be right. Of course this is all done subconsciously. Any fortunate events are deflected to God and seen as a blessing and any unfortunate events are deflected to Satan (or God) and seen as a curse. There's also just enough of a blending of real-life advice and a sense of community and support, that it becomes real to everyone involved. In that sense it is real to the people in it.

You'll notice easily if you visit several different churches, there are a lot of cultural differences, and knowing how to fit in your church is just as much about learning the do's and don't's as it is about knowing the Bible. And of course, being able to recite and drop verses into your debates and discussions earns you major brownie points. It's not that hard to remember a few verses and recycle them. Most people won't even notice you're using the same verse, especially if you use it many different contexts. If your memory sucks, jotting down Bible verses constitutes "taking notes" and is seen as even more devotion.

All this from first-hand experience.
 
Old 01-05-2011, 08:39 PM
 
Location: New York City
5,556 posts, read 6,735,102 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Georgiafrog View Post
Now, how should one react to this? A great job of divisive continuity.
Don't lose sleep over it. I spent 20 years in South Florida (well, that's a different country but I loved the place). Then again, South Florida is not exactly the middle of Mississippi, another world unto itself.

In any event, my comment was said in jest.
 
Old 01-05-2011, 08:45 PM
 
Location: Rome, Georgia
2,660 posts, read 3,216,900 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Asheville Native View Post
Ain't that the truth I suspect I know some of the answers, things learned from living in the south all my life, and knowing the character of the people here. Plain, simple, hard working, stubborn, prideful people. These people have a tremendous amount of common sense, can fix or figure out just about anything. People that can build a barn, fix a tractor in a middle of a field with a crescent wrench and a pair of water pumps (channel locks), slaughter a pig, birth a calf, you name it, they can do it, and have done it.

Though they are likely only a few left today, I have met elderly that have never been more than 50 miles from their place of birth, and if they have it was probably only because of their service in the military.

Away from their religion, these are the some of the finest people I have met. You have to know how to approach and talk to them. Asking permission to hunt on their land (posted no hunting) is usually successful, *_if_* they are approached in the right way. I suspect there isn't a single person not from the south that would be successful. If they say 'no' you didn't waste your time asking again, as it is futile, and insulting to them.

Did I mention "stubborn" I don't think anyone has any concept of what stubborn really is until experienced talking to or working with these people. And it carries over into their religion. I would recommend that no one discuss religion with them, unless you go to the very same church, and know you are on the same page they are on.
I must say, one of the best quotes that I have ever seen on CD. Truly an understanding of the people of the south. Good and bad.
 
Old 01-05-2011, 08:46 PM
 
7,793 posts, read 10,475,333 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Georgiafrog View Post
Or maybe atheists should not attend church services? There are many atheists in the south, and many more of us who are not religious. There are also many aspects to living in the south that are favorable to me, and are not religious in nature. It seems to me that June, as well as others, use a broad brush to paint what they (sometimes admittedly) do not understand. Biggest question to a non-believer from a skeptic is, "Who cares what they do, or what differences religious people have between them"?
Trust me: June will be the first to admit that which she does not understand! June is not putting down the south in her OP; rather, she is asking (based on her extremely limited church attendence) what accounts for the vast difference in beliefs and how they are conveyed? It seems demographically cultural to her.....Maybe atheists (as you indicated) shouldn't attend church services. --But June was someone's house guest, and "when in Rome...." along with the fact that June possesses an inherent curiousity as regards religion and how people live, believe, and act. She doesn't think that's a bad thing, and she did her best to go into this experience as open minded as any atheist can probably be....June's not terribly judgemental; she just processes....Perhaps June is in fact using a "broad brush" in which case she can only claim ignorance of church services in general....

However, there still exists in her mind something that must account for the types of (all two) services she attended up her in the north, vs. what she experienced in the south. She's not saying that one is or was "better" than the other, as she is hardly in any sort of position to do so.

She is just mystified as regards how something as basically unifying in it's conceptualization and doctrine as Christianity says it is can be so dramatically different....Based on where one is???
 
Old 01-05-2011, 08:49 PM
 
Location: Somewhere
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Quote:
Originally Posted by june 7th View Post

trettep:
Thank you for your response. Without looking up, and reading the full context of the quotes that you provided from Corinthians, June is somewhat still left in the dark...She is curious, though, as regards the 1 Corinthians 11:19 passage, as it would almost seem to speak to (if not predict) that "heresies" not only would and should exist, but would somehow be deemed necessary. (Which makes no sense to June.)

June appreciates what you wrote regarding the divisions that exist (which she has been clearly aware of) and yet, is curious as to how Christians think of and deal with this. In other words, there is no doubt in June's mind if either of her minister friends attended a church service or spoke with a pastor in the south, that they would agree on the fundamental principles of Christianity. However, the "delivery" (if you will) of that message struck June as being dramatically different. (And both northern ministers are "biblically based" ministers.)

In short, June remains at a loss as regards the vast differences when it comes to a religion that --at it's base-- is one that bespeaks unity in it's beliefs....


Take gentle "still confused" care...
June, I think the sick, the weak, the confused, etc... exists that those approved can bear fruit. That they have subjects by which to help. To give aid to, to bring light to, to love. We need divisions that the Truth can be seen as precious. For what if we had light but never darkness - would we appreciate the light as much? Jesus said what reward have we if we only love those that love us. Therefore, the opposition is even a blessing unto us for reward. Divisions are not only necessary but at this time they are GOOD.
 
Old 01-05-2011, 09:07 PM
 
1,492 posts, read 2,230,937 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by june 7th View Post
Let June start off by saying that she in no possible way means any disrespect to anyone's denominational beliefs or mindset. Likewise, let it be said that June tends to regard herself as a fairly open minded person who tends to strive quite hard to understand and accept where others are coming from; be it culturally (religiously denominational) or otherwise.

June just spent a week in the Bible Belt. As the people she was spending her visit with are Christians, June naturally went to church with them come Sunday morning. (June had only attended a very few church services up north, at home, prior to this, in being friends with two ministers...)

June's question is this: How does one account for the vast divide that would clearly seem to exist across demographics? Why such a difference in mindset in the bible belt as opposed to here, up north? June actually spent a good amount of time talking with the pastor who ran the service; June is someone who wishes to understand other's beliefs and how they apply to real life. --And yet, June is confused as regards what the northern ministers would have to say versus what she experienced in the south. (And NO disrespect is meant or intended here to anyone who resides in the south. Truly!)

Perhaps what June is really asking is this: If you all really have ONE God, then what accounts for such vast variations in terms of your understanding of him, and how do you all reconcile that? June has clearly been on this forum long enough to know that such divides exist, but she is curious as to what other's responses would be...Perhaps as being a "northern intellectual atheist" she was completely unprepared for what she experienced, overall, but still has come away wondering: How do YOU all reconcile the differences that exist, and how do they matter and translate into one's real life as a Christian?

Thanks to all (in advance) who respond here.



Take gentle helpful care.
all good questions,unfort. I don't have any answers for you;I've lived here all my life and am still confused. :/
I would venture a comment but I don't think my fellow southerners would like it,so...
sometimes I think I would just fit in better up north...there isn't a whole lot about me that is southern or even thinks that way...I guess I just got tired of it,and at an early age.I can't stand country music and have never, ever voted republican..that would condemn me to hell in a lot of places...OH but if I only believed in hell,which I don't.
I also, generally speaking,enuciate,try to spell correctly,and am not particularly crazy about nascar.
 
Old 01-05-2011, 10:06 PM
 
Location: Beautiful Niagara Falls ON.
10,024 posts, read 10,196,253 times
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There is room within Christianity to worship, praise and learn about the things of God in almost unlimited ways. The church service that I'm accustomed to would in no way whatsoever resemble that of, let's say an Ethiopian orthodox service or a church service done in some village in Africa or India. Because the mode of the service is totally different, does that make it wrong? Absolutely not.

The problem in many churches today is that they stray far far away from what Jesus gives Christians as their commission. In church, in what ever manner it's done we are commanded to "PREACH" the gospel. The gospel is the power of God unto saving men from their sins. Too many pastors preach like they are responsible for bringing people into the kingdom of heaven by their convincing salesmanship of just why a person should become a Christian. They sure manage to get plenty of false conversions with this method.

If I was to attend a church where any particular sin was singled out and preached against I would not attend that church again. As the sons and daughters of Adam we all have the problem of sin in our lives. Preach the good news, God uses that to save people and God deals with their sins in the process of scantification that all true believers go through for the rest of their lives.

One word of a political nature in a worship service and I would probable get up. shake the dust of my shoes and walk out of that place. Politics has NO place in a Christian service and the so called Christian right heaps dung on the head of God.
The Roman empire was exceedingly evil and our lord Jesus had NOTHING at all to say about the politics of His time. In fact when He was questioned by His enemies in order to trick Him into making a political statement He refused to bite and answered them, Give to Ceasar what is Ceasar's. Christians need to understand that the Kingdom of God is not of this world.
I sure don't want to go to church and hear what I could hear watching Oprah or Hannity. The church needs to be in the world but not of the world. Everything the world values is worthless to the Christian in relation to the riches that are in Christ Jesus.
 
Old 01-05-2011, 11:25 PM
 
Location: Texas
14,078 posts, read 17,119,756 times
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I have no interest in trying to dissect what someone else believes, or doesn't believe, nor in commenting upon whether or not the differences are cultural or religious. That probably won't lead to anything but another dispute. However, I would like to answer June's question about how those perceived differences are handled by believers.

Here's how I do it: If they profess Christ, and Him risen, that's as far as I'm willing to go. After all, that's the foundation of Christianity and it is upon this that our unity is found. If they have some beliefs or behavior's I find strange, that's none of my business as I can't say God hasn't given them an understanding I don't have. Maybe He did, maybe He didn't, but I'll still welcome them as Brothers in Christ and work with them to advance the Gospel.

As long as we all stay focused on Christ, which unifies us, and not on ourselves, which divides us, we can do great things together.
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