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Old 03-18-2013, 11:10 PM
 
Location: Southern Oregon
15,579 posts, read 7,042,470 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard1965 View Post
Ask a Jew if that's possible...If the writer had meant week, not use the Greek word for week?...
Remember that most of the writers were Jewish and used Jewish construction and idiom. I don't need to ask a Jew whether anyone can fast twice in one day when context and usage demonstrate that a week is being indicated. Do yourself a favor and gain access to a really good lexicon of Koine to English such as any of the editions of Arndt and Gingrich. It will help your understanding of the Biblical usage.
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Old 03-19-2013, 04:31 AM
 
Location: US
26,384 posts, read 13,994,881 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nateswift View Post
Remember that most of the writers were Jewish and used Jewish construction and idiom. I don't need to ask a Jew whether anyone can fast twice in one day when context and usage demonstrate that a week is being indicated. Do yourself a favor and gain access to a really good lexicon of Koine to English such as any of the editions of Arndt and Gingrich. It will help your understanding of the Biblical usage.
Uh-huh...Ok...You didn't answer the question...If the author intended to write week, then why did he not use the Greek word for week?...BTW, I studies biblical Greek and Hebrew years ago, so yea...Plus, I speak German, Italian, Spanish and Irish and I learned to read write and speak Chinese at 15 and I learned to speak Tagalog in the Navy...Traced the descent of Latin spoken throughout the various parts of the Roman empire into their present day Romance languages (even did a college paper on it)...I think I understand linguistics pretty well...In my opinion one must find an unbiased source for Greek and Hebrew in order to gain a valid translation...Like I said, If the author had meant week he would have used the existing Greek word for week in order to avoid confusion...Since they were Jews and were speaking to a majority Jewish church at the time they thought like Jews and spoke like Jews and Hebrew has a word for week seperate and distinct from the word for Sabbath, which is where many European languages get there word for Saturday, From Hebrew through Greek...So also does Greek have a seperate and distinct word for week apart from the Greek word for Sabbath...

(LITV)
Mat 28:1 But late in the sabbaths, at the dawning into the first of the sabbaths, Mary the Magdalene and the other Mary came to gaze upon the grave.

(YLT)

Mat 28:1 And on the eve of the sabbaths, at the dawn, toward the first of the sabbaths, came Mary the Magdalene, and the other Mary, to see the sepulchre,

Even the modern Hebrew New Testament has Sabbath/Saturday and Herew has a word for week...Which is not used...
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Old 03-19-2013, 06:34 AM
Zur
 
949 posts, read 624,025 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard1965 View Post
Uh-huh...Ok...You didn't answer the question...If the author intended to write week, then why did he not use the Greek word for week?...BTW, I studies biblical Greek and Hebrew years ago, so yea...Plus, I speak German, Italian, Spanish and Irish and I learned to read write and speak Chinese at 15 and I learned to speak Tagalog in the Navy...Traced the descent of Latin spoken throughout the various parts of the Roman empire into their present day Romance languages (even did a college paper on it)...I think I understand linguistics pretty well...In my opinion one must find an unbiased source for Greek and Hebrew in order to gain a valid translation...Like I said, If the author had meant week he would have used the existing Greek word for week in order to avoid confusion...Since they were Jews and were speaking to a majority Jewish church at the time they thought like Jews and spoke like Jews and Hebrew has a word for week seperate and distinct from the word for Sabbath, which is where many European languages get there word for Saturday, From Hebrew through Greek...So also does Greek have a seperate and distinct word for week apart from the Greek word for Sabbath...

(LITV)
Mat 28:1 But late in the sabbaths, at the dawning into the first of the sabbaths, Mary the Magdalene and the other Mary came to gaze upon the grave.

(YLT)

Mat 28:1 And on the eve of the sabbaths, at the dawn, toward the first of the sabbaths, came Mary the Magdalene, and the other Mary, to see the sepulchre,

Even the modern Hebrew New Testament has Sabbath/Saturday and Herew has a word for week...Which is not used...
Shalom!
I am not a Greek scholar. But I wanted to find out about that "week", I read a lot from Greek students and they come to different interpretations. What I remember is their was no Greek word for Shabbath (Hebrew) in Greek so they used "sabbaton" for the Hebrew Sabbath, the sevens day of the week. But the word Shabbath in Hebrew can also mean a day of rest on other days of the week during the feasts ( Lev 23:24+32+39). There is the commandment to cound 50 days for the Omer after the Sabbath (Lev 23: 11+15) That word became a controversy between the Sudduzees, which counted in the days of Jesus after the weekly Sabbath and the Pharisees, who counted from the 16th of Nisan, the day after the Sabbath of the feast, as it is nowadays. In every passover week there is a "Sabbath" of the feast and a weekly Sabbath. I believe, that the first Sabbaths in Mat 28:1 refers to the two Sabbaths of the Passover week, therefore the plural in Matthew makes it clear that this means the end of the weekly Sabbath, when the new day begins. But what is the second "Sabbaths"? I found another Sabbaths (plural) for weeks in Lev 23:15. The Greek has no word for this. Maybe you could find out what the Sebtuagint ( excuse my writing) says in Greek. Some Greek scholars say that the Greek had a "W" in sabbatwn, refering to the 7 special weeks after Pesach. Then the second Sabbaths are the weeks, the first or one of the weeks and because it is the day after the weekly Sabbath, it is indeed the Sunday, which is in agreement with scripture. But it does not IMO say that Mark 16:9 is the resurrection on Sunday.
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Old 03-19-2013, 09:19 AM
 
367 posts, read 281,827 times
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Many words have different meanings depending on usage and context. What does this mean?

A bass playing with a bass!

Tell me what you think it means:
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Old 03-19-2013, 10:32 AM
 
Location: US
26,384 posts, read 13,994,881 times
Reputation: 1601
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zur View Post
Shalom!
I am not a Greek scholar. But I wanted to find out about that "week", I read a lot from Greek students and they come to different interpretations. What I remember is their was no Greek word for Shabbath (Hebrew) in Greek so they used "sabbaton" for the Hebrew Sabbath, the sevens day of the week. But the word Shabbath in Hebrew can also mean a day of rest on other days of the week during the feasts ( Lev 23:24+32+39). There is the commandment to cound 50 days for the Omer after the Sabbath (Lev 23: 11+15) That word became a controversy between the Sudduzees, which counted in the days of Jesus after the weekly Sabbath and the Pharisees, who counted from the 16th of Nisan, the day after the Sabbath of the feast, as it is nowadays. In every passover week there is a "Sabbath" of the feast and a weekly Sabbath. I believe, that the first Sabbaths in Mat 28:1 refers to the two Sabbaths of the Passover week, therefore the plural in Matthew makes it clear that this means the end of the weekly Sabbath, when the new day begins. But what is the second "Sabbaths"? I found another Sabbaths (plural) for weeks in Lev 23:15. The Greek has no word for this. Maybe you could find out what the Sebtuagint ( excuse my writing) says in Greek. Some Greek scholars say that the Greek had a "W" in sabbatwn, refering to the 7 special weeks after Pesach. Then the second Sabbaths are the weeks, the first or one of the weeks and because it is the day after the weekly Sabbath, it is indeed the Sunday, which is in agreement with scripture. But it does not IMO say that Mark 16:9 is the resurrection on Sunday.
So are you saying you see the resurrection occurring on Saturday between sundown and sunup?...
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Old 03-19-2013, 10:34 AM
 
Location: US
26,384 posts, read 13,994,881 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DennisWayne View Post
Many words have different meanings depending on usage and context. What does this mean?

A bass playing with a bass!

Tell me what you think it means:
Like I said, Greek has a word for week...ethomatha...
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Old 03-19-2013, 01:17 PM
Zur
 
949 posts, read 624,025 times
Reputation: 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard1965 View Post
So are you saying you see the resurrection occurring on Saturday between sundown and sunup?...
The resurrection of Christ no one witnessed. When we agree that Mary Magdalene and the other Mary went late on the Sabbath or the end of the Sabbath KJV, than this was Saturday on sundown. The angel rolled the stone away and declared that Jesus was not there (already risen). When Mat 12:40 has to be fulfilled literally= 72 hours and He died on Wednesday 3pm He had to be raised Saturday at 3pm. The burial was Wednesday when the Sabbath(of the feast) drew on (Luke 23:54) and His body was raised on the third day,because between burial and resurrection are less than 72 hours.
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Old 03-19-2013, 01:54 PM
 
367 posts, read 281,827 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard1965 View Post
Like I said, Greek has a word for week...ethomatha...
And I point out again that the word is never used in scripture for week. Only the word you under discussion. Just because a word exist now does not mean it was in use by the Hebrews in the Middle East 2000 years ago.
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Old 03-19-2013, 02:50 PM
 
Location: US
26,384 posts, read 13,994,881 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DennisWayne View Post
And I point out again that the word is never used in scripture for week. Only the word you under discussion. Just because a word exist now does not mean it was in use by the Hebrews in the Middle East 2000 years ago.
Look it up in a Classical Greek dictionary...
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Old 03-19-2013, 03:00 PM
 
Location: US
26,384 posts, read 13,994,881 times
Reputation: 1601
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zur View Post
The resurrection of Christ no one witnessed. When we agree that Mary Magdalene and the other Mary went late on the Sabbath or the end of the Sabbath KJV, than this was Saturday on sundown. The angel rolled the stone away and declared that Jesus was not there (already risen). When Mat 12:40 has to be fulfilled literally= 72 hours and He died on Wednesday 3pm He had to be raised Saturday at 3pm. The burial was Wednesday when the Sabbath(of the feast) drew on (Luke 23:54) and His body was raised on the third day,because between burial and resurrection are less than 72 hours.
I agree, it was between Saturday sundown and Sunday sunup...According to the Jewish calendar it was still Saturday night up until sunup, when Sunday began...It was the Romans that marked the next day beginning at midnight not the Jews, and since the early church and it's Apostles were Jewish, well?...
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