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Old 01-31-2011, 08:38 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikebnllnb View Post
There is no sin. Only right and wrong, good and evil, necessary and unnecessary but no "sin".
Whatever makes you feel good is fine with me but disobedient to God.
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Old 01-31-2011, 11:47 AM
 
Location: Seward, Alaska
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Finn_Jarber View Post
Yes, He is with us, but IMO he would have to be here physically for someone to be able to witness Him heal someone and then accuse Him of being demon possessed. That is why I do not think that sin can be repeated today.
I can see your point. However, this isn't a blasphemy against Jesus, but rather it is blasphemy against the Holy Spirit, who is still here with us today. Instead of making Himself known through Jesus the Holy Spirit is now manifesting His presence through believers all over the world today.
Example: someone gets instantly healed by the power of the Holy Spirit working through some preacher or evangelist, and then someone watching it happen accuses him of being possessed of demons and healing by the power of Satan. Would not that be blaspheming against the Holy Spirit?


Bud
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Old 01-31-2011, 11:52 AM
 
Location: Seward, Alaska
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A question for ya'll: is there just ONE unforgiveable sin? Or more?
Seems to me blaspheming the Holy Spirit is one, and dying in unbelief is another...



Bud
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Old 01-31-2011, 12:51 PM
 
Location: Miami, FL
58,534 posts, read 31,926,753 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BudinAk View Post
Example: someone gets instantly healed by the power of the Holy Spirit working through some preacher or evangelist, and then someone watching it happen accuses him of being possessed of demons and healing by the power of Satan. Would not that be blaspheming against the Holy Spirit?
Maybe. I made sure I added the IMO in my post. Personally I don't think it can be done today. If you look at it that way, then you would be guilty of it when a spirit filled person speaks in tongues and you say it is nothing but satanic babble. I have heard people say that here several times. I believe Jesus's physical presence is required. As it says in Matthew "Jesus knew their hearts", so He knew those particular pharisees would never repent and therefore die with their sins. So, he knew they would never be forgiven. This is not a core issue for me, so it doesn't matter whether or not it can be repeated today. I wouldn't suggest anyone test the ice on it.
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Old 01-31-2011, 01:08 PM
 
Location: arizona ... most of the time
11,825 posts, read 9,823,424 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BudinAk View Post
A question for ya'll: is there just ONE unforgiveable sin? Or more?
Seems to me blaspheming the Holy Spirit is one, and dying in unbelief is another...

Bud
When taken other scriptures ... it's the same thing.

Blaspheming the Holy Spirit and dying in unbelief are the same.
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Old 01-31-2011, 06:10 PM
 
Location: US
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sschulz View Post
Both Matthew and Mark say the sin of blasphemy against the Holy Spirit shall not be forgiven in this age or the age to come, which is the thousand year rule of Jesus. They do not say it will never be forgiven.

Matthew 12:31 Because of this I say to you, all sin and evil speaking shall be forgiven to men, but the evil speaking of the Spirit shall not be forgiven to men.
32And whoever may speak a word against the Son of Man it shall be forgiven to him, but whoever may speak against the Holy Spirit, it shall not be forgiven him, neither in this age, nor in that which is coming.

Mark 3 28 Verily I say to you, that all the sins shall be forgiven to the sons of men, and evil speakings with which they might speak evil,
29but whoever may speak evil in regard to the Holy Spirit hath not forgiveness -- to the age, but is in danger of age-during judgment;'

These people will go into "the lake of fire" where all carnal thought will be "burned" out of them and they will be purified.
Nonsense...
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Old 01-31-2011, 06:13 PM
 
Location: US
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Quote:
Originally Posted by twin.spin View Post
When taken other scriptures ... it's the same thing.

Blaspheming the Holy Spirit and dying in unbelief are the same.
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Old 02-01-2011, 09:05 AM
 
138 posts, read 139,420 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by twin.spin View Post
When taken other scriptures ... it's the same thing.

Blaspheming the Holy Spirit and dying in unbelief are the same.

That's right. Blaspheme is the flesh of man that denies the spirit of God. This is the tribulation that will end when all flesh has been destroyed and will never live again. This is also called the battle of Armageddon. This event is going to happen very soon so the word of God, the spirit, will be victorious.

All the created souls of man will remain in God as the earth changes into a paradise for us and then we'll get new immortal bodies that will never blaspheme the spirit again.
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Old 02-02-2011, 04:10 AM
 
Location: US
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Satan

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This article is about the concept of Satan. For the concept of "devil", see Devil. For other uses, see Satan (disambiguation).

Gustave Doré, Depiction of Satan, the antagonist of John Milton's Paradise Lost c.1866.


Satan (Hebrew: הַשָׂטָן ha-Satan), "the accuser",[1] is the title of various entities, both human and divine, who challenge the faith of humans in the Hebrew Bible.[2] In Christianity and Islam the title became a personal name, and "Satan" changed from an accuser appointed by God to test men's faith to the chief of the rebellious fallen angels ("the devil" in Christianity, "Shaitan" in Arabic, the term used by Arab Christians and Muslims).[3]
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[SIZE=2][[/SIZE][SIZE=2]hide[/SIZE][SIZE=2]][/SIZE][edit] Judaism

[edit] Hebrew Bible

The original Hebrew term, satan, is a noun from a verb meaning primarily to, “obstruct, oppose,” as it is found in Numbers 22:22, 1 Samuel 29:4, Psalms 109:6.[4] The word Ha-Satan is functionally identical to "the prosecutor" and is used similarly in the Talmud. Ha-Satan has traditionally translated as “the accuser,” or “the adversary.” The definite article “ha-”, English “the”, is used to show that this is a title bestowed on a being, versus the name of a being. Thus this being would be referred to as “the Satan.”[5]
Ha-Satan with the definite article occurs three times in the Hebrew Bible:Job's Satan In the Book of Job, ha-Satan is a member of the divine council, “the sons of God” who are subservient to God. Ha-Satan in this capacity is many times translated as “the prosecutor,” and is charged by God to tempt humans and to report back to God all who go against God’s decrees. At the beginning of the book, Job is a good person “who feared God and turned away from evil,” (Job 1:1) and has therefore been rewarded by God. When the divine council meets, God boasts to ha-Satan about Job and how Job is blameless and upright. Between Job 1:9-10 and 2:4-5, ha-Satan merely points out that God has given Job everything that a man could want, so of course Job would be loyal to God; but if all Job has been given, even his health, were to be taken away from him then his loyalty would wane. God therefore grants ha-Satan the chance to test Job.[7] Due to this, it has been interpreted that ha-Satan is under God’s control and cannot act without God’s permission. This is further shown in the epilogue of Job in which God is speaking to Job, ha-Satan is absent from these dialogues. “For Job, for [Job’s] friends, and for the narrator, it is ultimately Yahweh himself who is responsible for Job’s suffering; as Yahweh says to the “satan”, ‘You have incited me against him, to destroy him for no reason.’ (Job 2:3) ” [6]
[edit] Septuagint

In the Septuagint the Hebrew ha-Satan in Job and Zechariah is translated by the Greek word diabolos, slanderer, the same word in the Greek New Testament from which the English word devil is derived. Where satan is used of human enemies in the Hebrew Bible, such as of Hadad the Edomite and Rezon the Syrian, the word is left untranslated but transliterated in the Greek as satan, a neologism in Greek.[8] In Zechariah 3 this changes the vision of the conflict over Joshua the High Priest in the Septuagint into a conflict between "Jesus and the devil", identical with the Greek text of Matthew.
[edit] Hebrew Apocrypha

The Jewish apocrypha are religious writings which are not accepted as religious texts in Judaism and many modern-day Protestant denominations. These works usually bore the names of ancient Hebrew worthies in order to establish their validity among the true writers' contemporaries. To reconcile the late appearance of the texts with their claims to primitive antiquity, alleged authors are represented as "shutting up and sealing" (Dan. XII. 4:9) the works until the time of their fulfillment had arrived; as the texts were not meant for their own generations but for far-distant ages (also cited in Assumption of Moses I. 16:17). In the Book of Wisdom, the devil is represented as the being who brought death into the world.[9]
The 2nd Book of Enoch, also called the Slavonic Book of Enoch, contains references to a Watcher Grigori called Satanael.[10] It is a pseudepigraphic text of an uncertain date and unknown authorship. The text describes Satanael as being the prince of the Grigori who was cast out of heaven[11] and an evil spirit who knew the difference between what was "righteous" and "sinful".[12] A similar story is found in the book of 1 Enoch; however, in that book, the leader of the Grigori is called Semjâzâ.
In the apocryphal literature, Satan rules over a host of angels.[13] Mastema, who induced God to test Abraham through the sacrifice of Isaac, is identical with Satan in both name and nature.[14]
For the Chasidic Jews of the eighteenth century, ha-Satan was Baal Davar.[15] The Book of Enoch contains references to Satariel, thought also to be Sataniel and Satan'el (etymology dating back to Babylonian origins). The similar spellings mirror that of his angelic brethren Michael, Raphael, Uriel and Gabriel, previous to his expulsion from Heaven.
[edit] Talmud and other rabbinic sources

The Talmud mentions the Satan in many places. In all of these places, the Satan is an agent of God, and has no independent existence. Sometimes the Satan is conflated with various demons, such as Asmodai. At times there is even some sympathy for him. Commenting on the Book of Job, the rabbis express sympathy that his job was to "break the barrel but not spill any wine."
In Kabbalistic literature and its derivative, Hasidic literature, the Satan is seen as an agent of God whose job is to tempt one into sin, and then turn around and accuse the sinner on high. An additional understanding of Satan is from a parable to a prostitute who is hired by the King (God) to tempt his son (a Jew). The prostitute has to do the best she can to tempt the son; but deep down she hopes the son will pass the test. Similarly, Kabbalistic/Hasidic thought sees the Satan in the same situation. His job is to tempt us as best he can; turn around and accuse us; but deep down his wish is that we would resist his blandishments. - Satan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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