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Old 07-18-2008, 01:16 PM
 
Location: Tennessee/Michigan
27,998 posts, read 46,395,848 times
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BOSTON -- Three Catholic women will be ordained as priests in a Back Bay neighborhood church this weekend, despite the Vatican's admonition that the trio will be excommunicated if they do so.

"Excommunication or not, I will still be a validly ordained priest and still will be able to serve the people of God," said Gabriella Velardi Ward, 61, a Staten Island architect and mother of two.

3 Catholic Women To Be Ordained Priests - Boston News Story - WCVB Boston (http://www.thebostonchannel.com/news/16920636/detail.html - broken link)
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Old 07-18-2008, 05:57 PM
 
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It says they are being ordained in a Presbyterian church. You will not find them in a Roman Catholic Church. Many people do believe they are still Catholic even if they are excommunicated.
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Old 07-18-2008, 09:28 PM
 
Location: Maryland
3,540 posts, read 5,962,799 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John1960 View Post
BOSTON -- Three Catholic women will be ordained as priests in a Back Bay neighborhood church this weekend, despite the Vatican's admonition that the trio will be excommunicated if they do so.

"Excommunication or not, I will still be a validly ordained priest and still will be able to serve the people of God," said Gabriella Velardi Ward, 61, a Staten Island architect and mother of two.

3 Catholic Women To Be Ordained Priests - Boston News Story - WCVB Boston (http://www.thebostonchannel.com/news/16920636/detail.html - broken link)
We can now add another group to the long of denominations.

They will not be "validly" ordained by the Catholic Church
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Old 07-19-2008, 10:32 AM
 
1 posts, read 1,517 times
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Default Women Priests?

Women can not be priests in the Catholic Church, no
matter what they may think. A women is validly ordained by
a validly ordained male Catholic Bishop, but loses this
chain with her and can't ordain anyone else (and can't even
practice her Priesthood publicly or she is excommunicated).

If a women wants to be a Priest she should think about
another Order or Apostilate. There are many many
important roles in the Church for women who feel the call.

The Church is not a Democracy and has remained much the
same as it's ever been for 2000 years. It stands strong,
alone in a world of slipping moralities and a wishy washy
pluralistic secular world.

If someone has further questions they should call Catholic
Answers apologists line. (Google it)
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Old 07-19-2008, 07:56 PM
 
Location: Northern Va. from N.J.
4,368 posts, read 4,094,059 times
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Interesting column NCR
Why them and not us? | National Catholic Reporter Conversation Cafe (http://www.ncrcafe.org/node/2004 - broken link)
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Old 07-19-2008, 08:06 PM
 
Location: Northern Va. from N.J.
4,368 posts, read 4,094,059 times
Reputation: 2652
Quote:
Originally Posted by chadbrow View Post
Women can not be priests in the Catholic Church, no
matter what they may think. A women is validly ordained by
a validly ordained male Catholic Bishop, but loses this
chain with her and can't ordain anyone else (and can't even
practice her Priesthood publicly or she is excommunicated).

If a women wants to be a Priest she should think about
another Order or Apostilate. There are many many
important roles in the Church for women who feel the call.

The Church is not a Democracy and has remained much the
same as it's ever been for 2000 years. It stands strong,
alone in a world of slipping moralities and a wishy washy
pluralistic secular world.

If someone has further questions they should call Catholic
Answers apologists line. (Google it)
The Church used to resemble more of a Democracy then it does now.
The people and priests used to choose their bishops
The Church was less centralised
The first bishop of Maryland was chosen this way
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Old 07-19-2008, 08:19 PM
 
2,790 posts, read 5,578,169 times
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It is a shame that the Catholic church will not consider ordaining women who wish to serve the Lord, then they could stop stealing married priests from the Episcopal church.
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Old 07-20-2008, 07:00 AM
 
Location: Northern Va. from N.J.
4,368 posts, read 4,094,059 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ted08721 View Post
The Church used to resemble more of a Democracy then it does now.
The people and priests used to choose their bishops
The Church was less centralised
The first bishop of Maryland was chosen this way
The original meaning of ekklesia [Greek work for church] is "democratic assembly of full citizens." In this spirit, bishops were commonly elected by the priests and people in the early church. The reform movement of the Middle Ages still demanded free election of bishops by clergy and people. The practice declined in the second millennium and ended officially with the Council of Trent in the 16th century. In the early U.S. church, the first U.S. bishop - John Carroll of Baltimore - was elected by priests and people. In the 18th and early 19th centuries, parishioners were heavily involved in the government of their parishes as lay trustees.
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Old 07-20-2008, 09:07 PM
 
Location: Maryland
3,540 posts, read 5,962,799 times
Reputation: 971
Quote:
Originally Posted by ted08721 View Post
The original meaning of ekklesia [Greek work for church] is "democratic assembly of full citizens." In this spirit, bishops were commonly elected by the priests and people in the early church. The reform movement of the Middle Ages still demanded free election of bishops by clergy and people. The practice declined in the second millennium and ended officially with the Council of Trent in the 16th century. In the early U.S. church, the first U.S. bishop - John Carroll of Baltimore - was elected by priests and people. In the 18th and early 19th centuries, parishioners were heavily involved in the government of their parishes as lay trustees.
Not quite sure about your facts. The final confirmation was and is Romes's


"In response to a petition sent by the Maryland clergy to Rome, 6 November, 1783, for permission for the missionaries here to nominate a superior who should have some of the powers of a bishop, Father Carroll, having been selected, was confirmed by the pope, 6 June, 1784, as Superior of the Missions in the thirteen United States of North America, with power to give confirmation. "

Catholic Encylopedia
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Old 07-20-2008, 10:39 PM
 
Location: Northern Va. from N.J.
4,368 posts, read 4,094,059 times
Reputation: 2652
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oakback View Post
Not quite sure about your facts. The final confirmation was and is Romes's


"In response to a petition sent by the Maryland clergy to Rome, 6 November, 1783, for permission for the missionaries here to nominate a superior who should have some of the powers of a bishop, Father Carroll, having been selected, was confirmed by the pope, 6 June, 1784, as Superior of the Missions in the thirteen United States of North America, with power to give confirmation. "

Catholic Encylopedia
No doubt Rome has the final say.

References: Eugene Bianchi and Rosemary Ruether, A Democratic Catholic Church (New York: Crossroad, 1992); Jay Dolan, The American Catholic Experience (Garden City NY: Doubleday, 1985).

Eugene C. Bianchi is emeritus professor of religion at Emory University
Jay Dolan emeritus professor of history at Notre Dame
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