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Old 08-16-2008, 10:23 PM
 
Location: among the chaos
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I met a couple the other night who attend a Catholic Church in the Anglican tradition. Can someone tell me what that means.

When they described it, it sounded very Catholic, just more traditional. When I tried to do some research, it sounded like the Anglican Church broke away from the RCC.

Any help?
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Old 08-17-2008, 12:18 PM
 
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It means they are not affiliated with the RC Church. I've never heard it expressed that way before. Episcopalians and Greek Orthodox say they are catholics too.

All churches broke away from the RC Church. This happened after the Reformation or Great Schism.
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Old 08-17-2008, 01:59 PM
 
Location: Junius Heights
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Quote:
Originally Posted by weatherologist View Post
When they described it, it sounded very Catholic, just more traditional. When I tried to do some research, it sounded like the Anglican Church broke away from the RCC.
?
Okay prepare for confusing terminology.

The Anglican church is a church that broke with Catholicsm over the nature of the Pope. The Anglican communion is a global church body, with the Archbishop Of Canturbury (Currently +Williams) occupying a sort of first among equals role, but with no directo Autohrity over any branch of the Anglican Communion except his own (The Church of England). Different Geographic Areas Each Contain one Official Anglican Church (In America it is the Episcopal Church with +Schori as presiding bishop) The churches can differ from each other, but are definde as Anglican if they are in communion with the Archbishop of Canturbury. In America chruches that have split from the Episcopal Church often call themselves Anglican Churches. This is not really correct as they are not in Communion with Canturbury. So oddly enough in Most contries if a church calls itself Anglican it is part of the Anglican Communion, but in American if a church calls itself Anglican it is probably NOT part of the Anglican communion, but a more conservative church who uses a historic (rather than the current ) Anglican lituragy.

Confused?
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Old 08-17-2008, 02:08 PM
 
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We're Episcopalian. My wife converted from Catholicism. Her parents finally got over it to visit our church for our daughter's confirmation. They were surprised to find the liturgy very close to a traditional service prior to Vatican II.
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Old 08-17-2008, 02:24 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Okiegirlfriend View Post
It means they are not affiliated with the RC Church. I've never heard it expressed that way before. Episcopalians and Greek Orthodox say they are catholics too.

All churches broke away from the RC Church. This happened after the Reformation or Great Schism.
While I most definitely agree with you that Protestant churches broke away from the RCC, the Orthodox are indeed catholic and view the RCC as the schismatics. But that's a whole other huge debate for a different thread, and one in which I'm not inclined to participate as I am kinda stuck as to which church I want to convert to.

Last edited by aquila; 08-17-2008 at 02:35 PM..
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Old 08-17-2008, 02:32 PM
 
Location: Junius Heights
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Originally Posted by cpg35223 View Post
We're Episcopalian. My wife converted from Catholicism. Her parents finally got over it to visit our church for our daughter's confirmation. They were surprised to find the liturgy very close to a traditional service prior to Vatican II.
Rite I or Rite II ?
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Old 08-17-2008, 03:27 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Macbeth2003 View Post
Rite I or Rite II ?
The rite our in-laws remarked upon was Rite I.

Depends on the service. Our 9 a.m. service is mostly a younger crowd, so we have Rite II. Our 11 a.m. service is older, so that one is Rite I, with the first Sunday of the month being Morning Prayer and Sermon.

Our 7:30 service, however, is 1928 BCP. Our 5 p.m. service is Rite II.

During the Summer, we combine 9 and 11 a.m. services into a single 10 a.m. service, alternating between Rite I and II on different Sundays.
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Old 08-17-2008, 04:55 PM
 
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The Anglican church actually has a tradition in England that predates Catholicism by several hundred years. There is unquestioned historical evidence of Christian churches in Britain as early as the early-3rd century. The writings of Tertullian and Origen suggest that Christian communities may have been established decades earlier. Three English bishops were known to be present at the Council of Arles in 314. Others attended the Council of Sardica in 347 and Ariminum in 360. Augustine of Hippo's doctrine of original sin was nearly defeated by Pelagius, a native of Britain. The Roman church was not established in Britain until Pope Gregory sent Saint Augustine in 597, almost 400 years after the arrival of Christianity in the British Isles.
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Old 08-17-2008, 05:16 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MICoastieMom View Post
The Anglican church actually has a tradition in England that predates Catholicism by several hundred years. There is unquestioned historical evidence of Christian churches in Britain as early as the early-3rd century. The writings of Tertullian and Origen suggest that Christian communities may have been established decades earlier. Three English bishops were known to be present at the Council of Arles in 314. Others attended the Council of Sardica in 347 and Ariminum in 360. Augustine of Hippo's doctrine of original sin was nearly defeated by Pelagius, a native of Britain. The Roman church was not established in Britain until Pope Gregory sent Saint Augustine in 597, almost 400 years after the arrival of Christianity in the British Isles.
Not that I'm questioning the validity of what you're saying, but do you have a link to the sources for that information? I'd be interested in researching it. Thanks.
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Old 08-17-2008, 05:29 PM
 
Location: Junius Heights
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Originally Posted by aquila View Post
Not that I'm questioning the validity of what you're saying, but do you have a link to the sources for that information? I'd be interested in researching it. Thanks.
MICoastieMom speaks truth. For Example

Pelagius - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Short quotes:
It is likely that Pelagius and Pelagianism were influenced by both Pelagius's Celtic ancestry and his Greek styled learning

the Encyclopedia of World Biography states that, "wide spread evidence indicates that he came originally from the British Isles."

Roman Catholic Church in England and Wales - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

and existed independently of the Bishop of Rome,

Celtic Christianity - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Now is there really a line from these to modern Anglicanism ? No, but England did have a Christian tradition separate from Rome long before the Schism.
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