U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Religion and Spirituality > Christianity
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-12-2009, 12:28 AM
 
14,752 posts, read 27,581,493 times
Reputation: 8732

Advertisements

Did any of you go to Catholic school? If so, has it shaped you? If not, has it shaped any of your friends or acquaintances?

I have 16 years of Catholic school under my belt. Grammar school was great, high school was ok, but it was absurd to go to a Catholic college in my mind, especially seeing that I had to write a bigger check for my student loans. I sort of turned away from religion for about 5+ years after that. I was kind of angry at how secular and hypocritical some Catholics and Christians are, but I slowly moved back...

If you went to one or know people who did, do you notice that all these Catholic school alumni just seem to "find each other?" It's unbelievable how many products of Catholic school I happen to befriend as an adult.
What do you think of how this process changes you? Does it make you more...or less...Catholic/Christian?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-12-2009, 01:31 AM
 
Location: 3814′45″N 12237′53″W
4,152 posts, read 9,593,674 times
Reputation: 3398
Interesting question.
I did not go to Catholic school growing up but ended up choosing to go to:
Welcome - The Catholic University of America
but not for religious reasons actually, although my very Catholic parents were very very happy.
Pretty much all of the other students had gone to parochial school for their entire education. The secular hypocrites were right there as well.
That might explain how much of the Catholic school alumni find one another perhaps?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-12-2009, 08:16 AM
 
Location: Northern Va. from N.J.
4,368 posts, read 4,096,682 times
Reputation: 2652
I did go to Catholic grammar school; overall it was a negative experience for various reasons.
I did refused to go to Catholic high school.
As far as shaped/frame of mind I don’t think you can go to a Catholic school for at least nine years(k-8) without having an effect upon one’s psyche.
I think everybody’s experience is different but overall I think a strong profound sense of sacredness is developed that never quite leaves you even if you are not actively practicing your Catholic faith, and in fact may lead someone back into more of an active faith.
It’s kind of hard to stop being Catholic, which is lost on those that convert and point an accusing finger at cradle Catholics claiming that they are not true Catholics and are only cultural Catholics; I don’t think they will ever really understand.

As far as the religion of friends, well I live in the Northeast where Catholics make up about 45% of the population, the other 55% are made up of other Christians, Jews, Muslim etc.
Even in my latest small group of friends the one black person is even Catholic.
In high school my circle of friends were a little more than half Catholic, the other half were Protestants and Jews.
And you know what, we all got along.
Never had a problem, we all respected each and others beliefs.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-12-2009, 10:14 AM
juj
 
Location: Too far from MSG
1,657 posts, read 2,286,286 times
Reputation: 330
Quote:
Originally Posted by ted08721 View Post
I did go to Catholic grammar school; overall it was a negative experience for various reasons.
I did refused to go to Catholic high school.
As far as shaped/frame of mind I don’t think you can go to a Catholic school for at least nine years(k-8) without having an effect upon one’s psyche.
I think everybody’s experience is different but overall I think a strong profound sense of sacredness is developed that never quite leaves you even if you are not actively practicing your Catholic faith, and in fact may lead someone back into more of an active faith.
It’s kind of hard to stop being Catholic, which is lost on those that convert and point an accusing finger at cradle Catholics claiming that they are not true Catholics and are only cultural Catholics; I don’t think they will ever really understand.

As far as the religion of friends, well I live in the Northeast where Catholics make up about 45% of the population, the other 55% are made up of other Christians, Jews, Muslim etc.
Even in my latest small group of friends the one black person is even Catholic.
In high school my circle of friends were a little more than half Catholic, the other half were Protestants and Jews.
And you know what, we all got along.
Never had a problem, we all respected each and others beliefs.
I grew up as a Lutheran in NYC and went to public schools. Mostly Catholic friends, followed by Jewish friends, and a smattering of every protestant denomination and orthodox. We also all got along and faith was never an issue, but rather a source of interesting conversation.

As far as Catholics are concerned, I believe that luke-warm, cafeteria, Catholics are the biggest danger to the Church. It turns out that most converts came to the Catholic Church because of it's doctrine. Being surrounded by secular liberalism, many cradle Northeasterners seem to take their faith lightly and pick and choose what they want to follow particularly on issues such as abortion.

I think the converts and the good cradles have it right. Embrace it all or move on.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-12-2009, 11:00 AM
 
Location: Northern Va. from N.J.
4,368 posts, read 4,096,682 times
Reputation: 2652
Quote:
Originally Posted by juj View Post
As far as Catholics are concerned, I believe that luke-warm, cafeteria, Catholics are the biggest danger to the Church. It turns out that most converts came to the Catholic Church because of it's doctrine. Being surrounded by secular liberalism, many cradle Northeasterners seem to take their faith lightly and pick and choose what they want to follow particularly on issues such as abortion.

I think the converts and the good cradles have it right. Embrace it all or move on.
Not my problem for whatever reason you came to our Church and found that most Catholics don't agree with you, you can call us names if that make you feel better.
If you are unhappy with the people you found when you entered, you can turn around and leave.
You might find the SSPX more to your liking Home Page of SSPX.org
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-12-2009, 12:14 PM
 
11,145 posts, read 13,550,038 times
Reputation: 4209
I grew up in a Catholic school. It was a good overall education, but:

1. Very frustrated, looking back, at how they never acknowledged the validity of other spiritual traditions. They believed we were the correct ones.

2. The way some nuns would yell at and verbally abuse the slower students was abhorrent. Absolutely abhorrent. Servants of God they were not.

I went to a very mixed secular private high school where I was exposed to Muslims, Hindus, Pagans, and every other religion you could imagine. I found it to be a far more valuable experience in enriching me spiritually.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-12-2009, 12:19 PM
juj
 
Location: Too far from MSG
1,657 posts, read 2,286,286 times
Reputation: 330
Quote:
Originally Posted by ted08721 View Post
Not my problem for whatever reason you came to our Church and found that most Catholics don't agree with you, you can call us names if that make you feel better.
If you are unhappy with the people you found when you entered, you can turn around and leave.
You might find the SSPX more to your liking Home Page of SSPX.org
So you want the Catholic Church to totally change it's morality because lower morality is more convenient? I don't think the Church will listen. I haven't called anyone any names. But I know one name I won't call Catholics for abortion: Catholics. These folks couldn't have paid attention in class or are just to prideful and want to do everything their own way. That's not the Catholic way. That's the protestant way.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-12-2009, 12:22 PM
juj
 
Location: Too far from MSG
1,657 posts, read 2,286,286 times
Reputation: 330
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluefly View Post
I went to a very mixed secular private high school where I was exposed to Muslims, Hindus, Pagans, and every other religion you could imagine. I found it to be a far more valuable experience in enriching me spiritually.
You are not the only people who think that way. Father Corapi, a famous speaker on EWTN and other venues once said:

If you want a good Catholic who defends the faith and all it's doctrines, send him to a public school. If you want a luke-warm, cafeteria Catholic who takes their faith for granted, send them to a Catholic school. (That's a paraphrase. I don't know the exact quote.)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-12-2009, 02:57 PM
 
Location: Northern Va. from N.J.
4,368 posts, read 4,096,682 times
Reputation: 2652
Quote:
Originally Posted by juj View Post
So you want the Catholic Church to totally change it's morality because lower morality is more convenient? I don't think the Church will listen. I haven't called anyone any names. But I know one name I won't call Catholics for abortion: Catholics. These folks couldn't have paid attention in class or are just to prideful and want to do everything their own way. That's not the Catholic way. That's the protestant way.
What you accuse me of saying is not true, when did I ever say
"want the Catholic Church to totally change it's morality because lower morality is more convenient"
Can you tell me where I said that?????????????????????????

I haven't called anyone any names

You started the name calling with "luke warm/cafeteria Catholic



The name calling always begins when a person has nothing of substance to say.

You mention" Catholics for abortion"
Who mention abortion in this thread? NOBODY till you just did RED HERRING!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-12-2009, 03:14 PM
 
Location: Northern Va. from N.J.
4,368 posts, read 4,096,682 times
Reputation: 2652
Quote:
Originally Posted by juj View Post
You are not the only people who think that way. Father Corapi, a famous speaker on EWTN and other venues once said:

If you want a good Catholic who defends the faith and all it's doctrines, send him to a public school. If you want a luke-warm, cafeteria Catholic who takes their faith for granted, send them to a Catholic school. (That's a paraphrase. I don't know the exact quote.)
huh? "famous speaker on ETWN"
You have to be kidding me, first off EWTN is nothing but a neo-consevative blogging site that is more of a cult then anything else

You do know they went afoul of the local bishop don't you?
You do know that they told people to directly disobey their bishop don't you?

Overall Catholic schools primary and secondary have done an excellent job.
Most parents go through much financial sacrafice to send their children to Catholic school.
I would say most bishops, religious both priest,nuns.brothers and laity will disagree with your EWTN priest.
Do you have any idea how many people have gone through Catholic schools since the creation of the Catholic school system in our country.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Religion and Spirituality > Christianity
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top