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Old 06-09-2010, 11:21 AM
 
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I tend to shed tears when the Holy Spirit works in my heart, including during musical worship. Sometimes I have tried to hold it in, but when the Spirit moves, the tears tend to flow. While it is beautiful to feel the Spirit engaging my emotions, I want to be thankful for it but not dependent upon it. I want to worship God because of Who HE is, not how it makes me feel. I don't won't to be emotionally-driven in my worship.

Another thing is that I want to worship God beyond my comfort zone. Although I love contemporary praise and worship music, I try to worship God in traditional hymns and Black gospel sometimes because worshiping God should not be dependent upon my preferences or comfort zone. If it is all about God, I must decrease so that He can increase. It is really not about what type of music I like. If the lyrics and words of a song contain sound doctrine and truth, I should be able to worship God with all my heart.
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Old 06-09-2010, 12:11 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by june 7th View Post
June would beg to differ regarding the comment about fear; be it as regards religion or otherwise. Fear, in June's book (both professionally as well as personally) is rarely a good thing. The only time it strikes June as being useful is when it alerts the individual to some sort of danger, such that self preservation can kick in. --But that's about all. Fear is not a particularly great motivator, overall, in general...
Agree. Fear is a primitive emotion designed to supercharge our bodies for "fight or flight" . . . it is very damaging if maintained over prolonged periods. It is useless as a motivator for that reason . . . we tend to remove it from our consciousness as soon as it is feasible. You can get immediate compliance and motivation by placing a gun in someone's mouth and requesting their money. But sending them home by themselves to get their wallet will not work.
Quote:
June was somewhat relieved to read the words "emotions don't determine the truth" as she had to smile at a memory from over a year ago. A friend of hers had invited June to attend his church on Easter, 2009. June, little heathen that she is, had no idea quite what to expect. So imagine June's surprise when the music began, and her 'just June' little eyes welled up with tears. (June proceeded to nip that one in the bud pretty quickly, that's for darn sure!)
I am loathe to address this extremely important component of our spiritual purpose because of the need-satisfying power of emotion. Religious beliefs, like most of our emotionally-laden cognitive structures, serve as need-satisfiers for a variety of otherwise unsatisfiable or difficult to satisfy needs. Perhaps that is why, unlike other belief systems, religious beliefs have resisted change, despite the overwhelming evidence that every other area of human concern has clearly benefited from a natural intellectual evolution of knowledge. In plain English . . . we tend to believe what we NEED to believe in our innermost self . . . the stronger the need the stronger the belief.

These "hard to satisfy" (unsatisfied or unsatisfiable needs) vary across individuals. They are unique to each of us. Their only similarity is their strength and history of frustration in attempts to satisfy them. We tend to attach them to those things we are capable of satisfying. This is a main source of addictive behavior . . . not just external substances . . the substance for gambling addiction is self-generated adrenaline and dopamine infusion ("rush"). Our emotions are very powerful and they drive our perceptions and behavior in support of our strongest needs. We do not take lightly any challenges to them.
Quote:
So sometimes emotions don't necessarily determine any truth, other than....
~The fact that we feel them.
Not quite true, June . . . there is a truth behind them. Since emotions are interpreted (subconsciously) prior to registering in our consciousness . . . they can be manipulated to support either truth or untruth (either by others or our own unsatisfied needs). They are fundamentally devoid of valence and object . . . only magnitude (the reticular formation is activated or it isn't)

This is a key factor in a common tactic of those promotional sales presentations. They seek to generate strong levels of emotional magnitude in the participants (it is best if it is positive . . . but it really doesn't matter). Our motivation can be likened to a huge multi-ton round boulder . . virtually impossible to get started. But if we can get it rolling on its own (emoting) . . . then we can "nudge" it in the direction we wish it to go. This is why it is never wise to make important (and permanent) decisions when we are emoting strongly.

There is an important role of emotion in the production of a strong soul that should be understood . . . but is not simple nor easy to explain using common parlance. i will need to think about how it might be presented here.

P.S. I would echo June's evaluation of Bud and add that "just June" is likewise a warm, dear, and caring individual.

Be well, Mystic
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Old 06-09-2010, 12:21 PM
 
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Sin and hell are the most important pillars of Christianity. People are afraid of something bad happen to them, therefore there are Christian teachings of sins and hell, so that Christians keep coming back to church.
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Old 06-09-2010, 01:14 PM
 
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Sin and hell are not just important out of fear, but they are important because through Jesus Christ, we have been rescued from sin, death, and hell. Therefore, we are grateful for God's love and grace towards us. We know the depth of God's love because He saved us from sin, death, and hell.
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Old 06-09-2010, 01:14 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MysticPhD View Post
I am loathe to address this extremely important component of our spiritual purpose because of the need-satisfying power of emotion. Religious beliefs, like most of our emotionally-laden cognitive structures, serve as need-satisfiers for a variety of otherwise unsatisfiable or difficult to satisfy needs. Perhaps that is why, unlike other belief systems, religious beliefs have resisted change, despite the overwhelming evidence that every other area of human concern has clearly benefited from a natural intellectual evolution of knowledge. In plain English . . . we tend to believe what we NEED to believe in our innermost self . . . the stronger the need the stronger the belief.
While June understands what you are saying, she has the feeling that the difficulty in changing those cognitive structures (and subsequent feelings/emotions) has more to do with one's respective culture/society upon which one's religious belief was formed and thus, supported.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MysticPhD
Not quite true, June . . . there is a truth behind them. Since emotions are interpreted (subconsciously) prior to registering in our consciousness . . . they can be manipulated to support either truth or untruth (either by others or our own unsatisfied needs). They are fundamentally devoid of valence and object . . . only magnitude (the reticular formation is activated or it isn't)
June tends to feel that it is due to one's internal objects that most emotions (especially those which are most intensely felt) stem/originate from, but that's just "just June!"

Quote:
Originally Posted by MysticPhD
There is an important role of emotion in the production of a strong soul that should be understood . . . but is not simple nor easy to explain using common parlance. i will need to think about how it might be presented here.
June has the funny feeling that there are two aspects, or dynamics, if you will: One, those individuals for whom "emotion" plays little relevance in their overall religous belief system; rather, it is more a cognitive construct. For others, however, she would surmise that there must somehow be derived an emotional component at play. If nothing else, a belief system that does not --on some basic, fundamental level, at least-- provide a sense of reassurance, comfort, and (hopefully?) peace would somehow hardly seem worthwhile. -In 'just June's' just opinion...There needs to be some benefit, or so June would imagine, but for the fact that she's just your run-of-the-mill little heathen atheist!

Quote:
Originally Posted by MysticPhD
P.S. I would echo June's evaluation of Bud and add that "just June" is likewise a warm, dear, and caring individual.
June thinks Mystic is too kind!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Latte'Chic View Post
Them are good apples.
Oh thank God! June was afraid you were gunna say "potatoes!"


Take gentle emotional care.
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Old 06-09-2010, 06:27 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Snuffy63 View Post
Hmmm...Never heard of it put that way, in a psychologically diagnostic manner...but you end it wonderfully! That's just how we are. Don't expect us to whoop and holler; it's completely out of character. Heck, when I was a Baptist (and I was for many MANY years), I couldn't get myself to holler "AMEN!" when the pastor struck a chord. Thought maybe I was defective.

Maybe we can think of ourselves as "dignified. " Please don't stone me for that statement. If you get emotional at worship, more power to you. God loves us regardless, RIGHT?
absolutely snuffy! I'm just a straightfwd thinker.
for example,in response to the infamous line used to hire salespersons.. 'sell me this pencil'..I would say something like.."well,it has a sharp tip,a nice paint job and a sturdy eraser.It is well-built and will last you a long time"...a non-emotional response.
whereas most ppl might give a more emotional answer of.."You can use it to write a letter to a long lost friend,or to draw an important piece of artwork,or to remind your spouse of why you love them so much....etc".
But I'm just not that way.and it's ok,God loves us all
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